Charles G Crawford, Ph.D.

Charles Crawford joined the U.S. Geological Survey in 1978 and has worked on a variety of water-quality investigations since. He is presently the Water Resource Assessment Branch Coordinator for Data Analysis and Statistics. Prior to that he was Coordinator for the National Water Quality Assessment Program Surface Water Monitoring Networks and the National Stream Quality Accounting Network.

Biography

Education

University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, 1973-76 (B.A.—Biology, magna cum laude with distinction)

Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 1976-78 (M.S.—Environmental Science)

Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 1986-96 (Ph.D.—Environmental Science)

Positions Held

2017-present—Coordinator of Data Analysis and Statistics, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Mission Area, Earth System Processes Division, Water Resource Assessment Branch, Indianapolis, IN—Responsible for modeling pesticide concentration analytical recoveries through time, analytical method comparison studies and methods for reconciling differences in concentrations from different methods, and consultation on statistical matters related to status and trends assessment for surface waters.

2015-2017—Coordinator of Data Analysis and Statistics, National Water Quality Program, U.S. Geological Survey, Indiana Water Science Center, Indianapolis, IN—Responsible for coordination and integration of NWQP constituent transport studies, regression modeling, and related sampling design among water-quality activities conducted by NWQP.

2012-2015—National Surface Water Monitoring and Status Assessment Coordinator, National Water Quality Assessment Program, U.S. Geological Survey, Indiana Water Science Center, Indianapolis, IN—Responsible for providing national-level, technical leadership, management, and coordination of the activities associated with the National Surface Water Monitoring and Status Assessment Team component of NAWQA and the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN).

2007-2012—Surface Water Status and Trends Coordinator, National Water Quality Assessment Program and National Stream Quality Accounting Network Program Coordinator, U.S. Geological Survey, Indiana Water Science Center, Indianapolis, IN—Responsible for providing national-level, technical leadership, management, and coordination of the activities associated with the Surface Water Status and Trends (SWST) component of NAWQA and the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN).  Chaired committee evaluating design of NASQAN program and wrote committee report.  Also served as adjunct member of NAWQA Pesticide National Synthesis Project Team responsible for continued development of Watershed Regressions for Pesticides models.

2005-2007—Surface Water Status and Trends Coordinator, National Water Quality Assessment Program, National Stream Quality Accounting Network Program Coordinator, U.S. Geological Survey, Indiana Water Science Center, Indianapolis, IN—Responsible for providing national-level, technical leadership, management, and coordination of the activities associated with the Surface Water Status and Trends (SWST) component of NAWQA.  Chaired committee evaluating design of SWST component of NAWQA and was lead author of committee report.  Also served as adjunct member of NAWQA Pesticide National Synthesis Project Team responsible for continued development of Watershed Regressions for Pesticides models.

2000-2005—Hydrologist, National Water Quality Assessment Program, Pesticide National Synthesis Project, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Indiana District, Indianapolis, IN—Responsible for project "Estimating pesticide concentrations in U.S. streams using nationally available data". Served as U.S. Geological Survey representative to an interagency scientific working group charged with using National Water Quality Assessment Program pesticide data to help meet the goals of the Food Quality Protection Act. The work group is comprised of representatives from USDA, USEPA, USGS, and the American Crop Protection Association. Organized workshop entitled "Watershed Regressions for Pesticides" (WARP) to present details of PNSP project to scientists from USDA, USEPA, and industry.  Wrote computer program WARPEST to predict pesticide concentrations in streams from user supplied watershed characteristics by means of the WARP model.  Wrote computer program WARPSIM to compute simulated daily pesticide concentrations by means of WARP model and time series models developed by Vecchia and Crawford (2006).

1997-1998—Assistant District Chief for Hydrologic Investigations, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Indiana District, Indianapolis, IN—Managed all hydrologic investigation in the Indiana District Office and supervised the Chiefs of the Hydrologic and Environmental Quality Studies Section and the Geohydrologic Studies Section.  [This was a collateral duty done concurrent with serving as Chief of the White River Basin Study.]

1990-2000—Chief, National Water Quality Assessment Program, White River Basin Study, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Indiana District, Indianapolis, IN—Responsible for project planning and budgeting and providing technical direction of project. Recruited and supervised interdisciplinary project staff of 8 full-time and several part-time employees (including 3 with Ph.D. and 3 with M.S. degrees). Served as liaison with other government agencies, industry, and media concerning project and project findings. Performed analysis and interpretation of surface-water pesticide data and historical fish data.  Assisted with analysis of historical pesticide and nutrient data. Presented results of study to both technical and non-technical audiences.  Wrote computer program LOADEST2 in Fortran.  This program has been used by projects of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Biological and Water Resources Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey to estimate constituent loads in streams.  Designed, wrote the html code, and maintained a series of web pages presenting information, reports, and data from the White River Basin NAWQA study.  Wrote Unix scripts to automate changes that had to be made to over 200 separate postscript files to create online version of "Hydrogeologic Atlas of Aquifers in Indiana".

1989-1990—Chief, Hydrologic Investigations Section, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Indiana District, Indianapolis, IN—Managed all hydrologic investigations done in the Indiana District Office. Served as principal liaison with funding agencies. Supervised 16 permanent employees and 7 temporary employees. Developed projects to investigate the effects of urban runoff on small streams (5 year duration, $600,000 budget) to evaluate the ground-water quantity and quality of Indiana’s only EPA designated sole-source aquifer (4 year duration, $740,000 budget), to estimate loads of metals in coastal rivers (1 year duration, $104,000 budget), and to evaluate the potential for bridge scour at 5000 bridges in Indiana (8 year duration, $3,000,000 budget). Served as project chief of the study to compute trace-metal loads in 149 coastal rivers done in cooperation with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service. Selected appropriate methods for dealing with censored data sets and wrote FORTRAN code to compute the load estimates.

1979-1989—Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Indiana District, Indianapolis, IN—Participated in hydrologic assessment of Indiana coal mining region. Collected hydrologic and water-quality data during both periods of steady-state flow and storm-runoff. Developed and managed a study to determine reaeration in the Wabash River using the modified tracer technique. Successfully applied the modified tracer technique to the Wabash River at flows of up to 7500 cubic feet per second (the largest streamflow for which the method had been used within the U.S. Geological Survey). Project chief of study examining hydrologic impact of surface mining on surface and ground water in Indiana. Project chief of study to characterize suspended sediment in 71 Indiana streams. Methods used included linear and nonlinear regression to develop transport curves, univariate statistics, and time-series analysis. Developed a method to estimate the precision of mean suspended-sediment loads obtained from the flow-duration rating-curve method. Project chief of study to evaluate point-source effluent loadings into the Grand Calumet River, one of the most industrialized watersheds in the United States. Planned and coordinated 24-hour field survey involving over 40 personnel from 2 government agencies, 5 companies, and 3 sanitary districts. Participated in study to determine impact of advanced treatment of municipal wastewater on the water quality of White River downstream of Indianapolis. Analysis included evaluation of changes in the benthic-invertebrate communities in the river and trend analysis of data from a water-quality monitoring network.  Wrote Statistical Analysis System (SAS) procedures to do the nonparametric Seasonal Kendall and Seasonal Rank-Sum statistical tests on hydrologic data.  These procedures were added to the U.S. Geological Survey implementation of SAS on an Amdahl mainframe computer.  Modeled dissolved oxygen regime of several small streams in Indiana. Preliminary work in use of zero-order kinetics to model nitrification resulted in this capability being added to U.S. Geological Survey steady-state dissolved-oxygen model.

1978—Hydrologic Field Assistant, U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Indiana District, Indianapolis, IN—Collected time of travel data necessary to model dissolved-oxygen regime of several small streams in Indiana.

1976-1978—Graduate Research Assistant, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Awards and Honors

U.S. Department of the Interior Meritorious Service Award, 2008

Co-recipient of Eugene M. Shoemaker Communication Award, 2007 (for USGS products that demonstrate extraordinary effectiveness in communicating and translating complex scientific concepts and discoveries into words and pictures that capture the interest and imagination of the American public)

Recognized by Mayor of the City of Indianapolis for contributions to the Clean Stream Team Advisory Committee, 2006

Charles Harold Bechert Award, 2006 (presented by the Indiana Water Resources Association for contributions to the advancement of water resources research, planning, and management for Indiana)

U.S. Department of the Interior Superior Service Award, 1999

Elected to Pi Alpha Alpha (National Public Affairs Honor Society), 1991

Indianapolis Council of Federal Agencies Federal’s Finest Award, 1981