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Oregon Water Science Center

Welcome to the USGS in Oregon. Our mission is to explore the natural world around us and provide reliable scientific information to help Federal, State, and local agencies, Tribes, and the public make well-informed decisions. Our research is widely used to manage Oregon's water resources for the benefit and safety of people and the environment. 

News

Introducing the Harney Basin groundwater model

Introducing the Harney Basin groundwater model

Three historic USGS streamgages recognized by new World Meteorological Organization designation

Three historic USGS streamgages recognized by new World Meteorological Organization designation

New project webpage: Modeling the water-quality effects to the Klamath River from drain recirculation

New project webpage: Modeling the water-quality effects to the Klamath River from drain recirculation

Publications

Comparing modern identification methods for wild bees: Metabarcoding and image-based morphological taxonomic assignment

With the decline of bee populations worldwide, studies determining current wild bee distributions and diversity are increasingly important. Wild bee identification is often completed by experienced taxonomists or by genetic analysis. The current study was designed to compare two methods of identification including: (1) morphological identification by experienced taxonomists using images of field-c
Authors
Cassandra Smith, Robert S. Cornman, Jennifer A. Fike, Johanna M. Kraus, Sara J. Oyler-McCance, Carrie E Givens, Michelle Hladik, Mark W. Vandever, Dana W. Kolpin, Kelly Smalling

Timing and source of recharge to the Columbia River Basalt groundwater system in northeastern Oregon

Recharge to and flow within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) groundwater flow system of northeastern Oregon were characterized using isotopic, gas, and age-tracer samples from wells completed in basalt, springs, and stream base flow. Most groundwater samples were late-Pleistocene to early-Holocene; median age of well samples was 11,100 years. The relation between mean groundwater age and com
Authors
Henry M. Johnson, Kate E. Ely, Anna-Turi Maher

Groundwater model of the Harney Basin, southeastern Oregon

Groundwater development, mainly for large-scale irrigation, has increased substantially in the Harney Basin of southeastern Oregon since 2010. Concurrently, some areas of the basin experienced groundwater-level declines of more than 100 feet, and some shallow wells have gone dry. The Oregon Water Resources Department has limited new groundwater development in the basin until an improved understand
Authors
Stephen B. Gingerich, Darrick E. Boschmann, Gerald H. Grondin, Halley J Schibel

Science

Groundwater Recharge to the Columbia River Basalt Groundwater System

Learn about the groundwater flow system within the Columbia River Basalt Group in the Umatilla River Basin.
link

Groundwater Recharge to the Columbia River Basalt Groundwater System

Learn about the groundwater flow system within the Columbia River Basalt Group in the Umatilla River Basin.
Learn More

Upper Klamath Basin Groundwater Studies

Since the late 1990s, USGS has worked to characterize the regional groundwater hydrology of the upper Klamath Basin. Research focuses on collecting data to evaluate the groundwater system and its response to external stresses, and to develop computer models that provide insights for water management. These efforts build on earlier USGS studies going back to the 1950s.
link

Upper Klamath Basin Groundwater Studies

Since the late 1990s, USGS has worked to characterize the regional groundwater hydrology of the upper Klamath Basin. Research focuses on collecting data to evaluate the groundwater system and its response to external stresses, and to develop computer models that provide insights for water management. These efforts build on earlier USGS studies going back to the 1950s.
Learn More

Oregon Water Science Center's Malheur Lake Portfolio

USGS scientists have partnered with local groups to learn about the processes affecting turbidity in Malheur Lake. Located in southeastern Oregon, Malheur Lake and the surrounding refuge provide critical habitat to birds migrating along the Pacific Flyway.
link

Oregon Water Science Center's Malheur Lake Portfolio

USGS scientists have partnered with local groups to learn about the processes affecting turbidity in Malheur Lake. Located in southeastern Oregon, Malheur Lake and the surrounding refuge provide critical habitat to birds migrating along the Pacific Flyway.
Learn More