James Cain, III, Ph.D.

James is originally from Tempe, Arizona. He received a B.S. from Colorado State University, an M.S. from California State University, Sacramento, and a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona.

Biography

Only James's five most recent publications are shown here. For more information about James, including a full publications list, visit his profile page on the New Mexico Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit web site. 

James also can be reached at his New Mexico State University email addressjwcain@nmsu.edu

Education

  • Ph D University of Arizona 2006
  • MS California State University-Sacramento 2001
  • BS Colorado State University 1997

Research Interests

James' research interests are primarily in wildlife-habitat relationships, population ecology, and the influence of management practices on native wildlife species. He is interested in using a rigorous scientific approach to address both basic and applied questions related to wildlife ecology, conservation and management. In general, his research interests focus on understanding the effects of environmental heterogeneity on habitat selection, resource use, movements and the landscape-level distribution of mammals and birds. Specifically he is interested in studies on how spatial and temporal variation in habitat characteristics, resources and constraints on resource use (e.g., predation risk) influence the movement, habitat selection and distribution of wildlife. Furthermore, he is interested in determining how habitat selection, at the local and landscape scales, is related to demographic rates and population dynamics, including the relationships between habitat quality and metapopulation dynamics. Another area of research involves the influence of natural resource management activities on wildlife and he works with government agencies to assess the implications of current and future land use and management practices on conservation of wildlife populations and communities.

Teaching Interests

James has been fortunate to have had the opportunity to teach a range of courses and gain teaching experiences with diverse groups of students at both U.S. and international universities. His experiences include teaching courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level and include courses in Wildlife Management, Field Methods for Wildlife and Conservation, Quantitative Biology, Wildlife -habitat Relationships, and Population and Community Ecology. His teaching interests include courses in large mammal ecology and conservation, wildlife-habitat relationships, field methods, and wildlife conservation and management.