Unified Interior Regions

Region 2: South Atlantic-Gulf (Includes Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands)

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 337
Winter Manatee Foraging Behavior and the Decline of Seagrass Beds in the Northern Indian River Lagoon
Date Published: April 17, 2016

Winter Manatee Foraging Behavior and the Decline of Seagrass Beds in the Northern Indian River Lagoon

With high numbers of manatees using the Florida Power and Light power plant warm water refuge during winter, their impact on the seagrass beds in the Indian River Lagoon is considered an important indicator of the long-term capacity of the area to support the manatees. USGS is working with partners to investigate the spatial extent and intensity of manatee use of seagrass beds in the area. ...

Contacts: James Reid
Coral Bleaching and Disease: Effects on Threatened Corals and Reefs
Date Published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Coral Bleaching and Disease: Effects on Threatened Corals and Reefs

Severe coral bleaching in 2005, followed by a disease outbreak, resulted in severe reef degradation in the US Virgin Islands; the amount of living coral cover at long-term monitoring sites decreased an average of 60%. With climate change, high seawater temperatures are expected to lead to more frequent bleaching episodes and possibly more disease outbreaks. 

Mangrove Migration Network
Date Published: April 17, 2016

Mangrove Migration Network

At the poleward marsh-mangrove ecotone, mangrove abundance and coverage is winter temperature-sensitive in that it oscillates in response to the frequency, duration, and/or intensity of extreme winter temperatures. Future winter climate change is expected to facilitate poleward mangrove range expansion at the expense of salt marshes in Texas, Louisiana, and parts of Florida. 

Map of habitat for Imperiled Freshwater Mussel Species in the S
Date Published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Life History Characterization and Host Fish Identification for Federally Listed and Imperiled Freshwater Mussel Species in the Suwannee River Basin in Georgia and Florida

Freshwater mussels are considered the most imperiled group of animals in the United States. These animals provide valuable ecological services by filtering water, sequestering nutrients, and providing forage for migratory birds, small mammals, and turtles. They also have a unique and complex life cycle that makes them especially vulnerable to human disturbances. It includes a parasitic larval...

Evaluation of Stream Reaches for Mussel Reintroduction in the Upper Coosa Watershed, NW Georgia
Date Published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluation of Stream Reaches for Mussel Reintroduction in the Upper Coosa Watershed, NW Georgia

The Conasauga River in northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee harbors the majority of mussel diversity still found in the Georgia portion of the Upper Coosa Basin. While the Conasauga historically supported at least 44 mussel species, only about 20 species remain. 

Alabama Barrier Island Restoration Assessment at Dauphin Island
Date Published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Alabama Barrier Island Restoration Assessment at Dauphin Island

Dauphin Island, Alabama, is the only barrier island providing protection to much of Alabama's coastal natural resources. Severely impacted by repeated extreme events, like Hurricane Katrina and Deepwater Horizon oil spill, USGS and partners are conducting a joint study to evaluate the feasibility of certain alternatives to increase resiliency and sustainability of the island. 

GIS and Custom Application Support for the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council
Date Published: April 16, 2016

GIS and Custom Application Support for the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council

 The scientists at the Wetland and Aquatic Science Center (WARC) have provided coastal restoration project managers and decision makers with GIS planning, database and custom application capacity since 1992. The scope and complexity of this support has increased over the years and has resulted in the development of a comprehensive geospatial and advanced application teams that provide decision...

What is the rate of trajectory of ecosystem development after wetland restoration and creation?
Date Published: April 15, 2016
Status: Active

Ecosystem Development After Wetland Restoration and Creation

Wetland restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as means to compensate for wetland losses. To address the need for evaluating the development of ecosystem structure and function in restored and created wetlands, USGS compared created tidal wetlands sites to natural mangrove wetlands in Tampa Bay, Florida. 

Rookery Bay NERR, FL, USA
Date Published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluating Structural and Surface Elevation Recovery of Restored Mangroves

Hydrologic restoration is one of several approaches to rehabilitate mangroves on a large-scale. USGS evaluates how solely restoring tidal hydrologic flows affect the recovery of mangroves in Florida. 

Figure 1. Major study areas of the TFFW vegetation modeling system (Krauss et al., 2009)
Date Published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Modeling Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands (TFFW) Habitat Changes for Land Management

As tidal freshwater forested wetlands - TFFWs - are influenced by salinty due to salt water intrusion, they may experience changes in plant community composition, growth, and productivity. Models are needed to predict vegetation community change or dieback, as well as changes in carbon sequestration and storage due to changing climate, drought, changes in freshwater discharge, elevated carbon...

Illustration of two sites with marked differences in hydrology and nutrient concentrations
Date Published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Dynamics and Fluxes of Nutrients along Environmental Gradients in the Florida Everglades, USA

USGS research in the Florida Everglades will provide information on how environmental conditions and disturbances impact carbon storage in mangrove systems.

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Year Published: 2018

Overwintering behavior of juvenile sea turtles at a temperate foraging ground

Most freshwater and terrestrial turtle species that inhabit temperate environments hibernate to survive extreme cold periods. However, for sea turtles, the question of whether these species use hibernation as an overwintering strategy has not been resolved (Ultsch 2006). Felger et al. (1976) suggested that sea turtles bury themselves in...

Lamont, Margaret M.; Seay, David R.; Gault, Kathleen

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Year Published: 2018

Introduction and dispersal of non-native bullseye snakehead Channa marulius (Hamilton, 1822) in the canal system of southeastern Florida, USA

An established population of bullseye snakehead (Channa marulius), a large predatory fish from southeastern Asia, was identified for the first time in North America from waters in southeastern Florida, USA, in the year 2000. Since then, it has dispersed throughout the extensive canal system in the area from West Palm Beach south to Miramar....

Benson, Amy J.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Gestring, Kelly B.

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Year Published: 2018

Chapter 13: Terrestrial wetlands

1. The assessment of terrestrial wetland carbon stocks has improved greatly since the First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (CCSP 2007) because of recent national inventories and the development of a U.S. soils database. Terrestrial wetlands in North America encompass an estimated 2.2 million km2, which constitutes about 37% of the global wetland...

Kolka, Randall; Trettin, Carl; Tang, Wenwu; Krauss, Ken W.; Bansal, Sheel; Drexler, Judith Z.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Chimner, Rodney A.; Hogan, Dianna M.; Pindilli, Emily J.; Benscoter, Brian; Tangen, Brian; Kane, Evan S.; Bridgham, Scott D.; Richardson, Curtis J.

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Year Published: 2018

Coupling high-frequency stream metabolism and nutrient monitoring to explore biogeochemical controls on downstream nitrate delivery

Instream biogeochemical process measurements are often short-term and localized. Here we use in situ sensors to quantify the net effects of biogeochemical processes on seasonal patterns in baseflow nitrate retention at the river-reach scale. Dual-station high-frequency in situ nitrate measurements, were coupled with high-frequency measurements of...

Jarvie, Helen P.; Sharpley, Andrew N.; Kresse, Timothy M.; Hays, Phillip D.; Williams, Richard J.; King, Stephen M.; Berry, Lawrence G.

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Year Published: 2018

A 3,000‐year lag between the geological and ecological shutdown of Florida's coral reefs

The global‐scale degradation of coral reefs has reached a critical threshold wherein further declines threaten both ecological functionality and the persistence of reef structure. Geological records can provide valuable insights into the long‐term controls on reef development that may be key to solving the modern coral‐reef crisis. Our analyses of...

Toth, Lauren T.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Stathakopoulos, Anastasios; Shinn, Eugene A.

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Year Published: 2018

StreamStats for South Carolina: A multipurpose water-resources web application

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed the South Carolina StreamStats application in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation. StreamStats (https://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/) is a map-based web application that provides analytical tools useful for water-resources planning and management and many engineering...

Feaster, Toby D.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Kolb, Katharine R.
Feaster, T.D., Clark, J.M., and Kolb, K.R., 2018, StreamStats for South Carolina—A multipurpose water-resources web application: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2018–3070, 5 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20183070.

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Year Published: 2018

Using heat as a tracer to determine groundwater seepage in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, April–November, 2017

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District, conducted a study to examine water fluxes in two small study areas in the Indian River Lagoon. Vertical arrays of temperature sensors were placed at multiple locations in the lagoon bed to measure temperature time series in the vertical profile. These...

Swain, Eric D.; Prinos, Scott T.
Swain, E.D., and Prinos, S.T., 2018, Using heat as a tracer to determine groundwater seepage in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, April–November, 2017: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1151, 18 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181151.

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Year Published: 2018

Expectations of Maurepas Swamp response to a river reintroduction, Louisiana

Mississippi River reintroductions (freshwater diversions) into wetlands previously disconnected from the river have been implemented in southeastern Louisiana as a means to rehabilitate degraded and submerging wetlands. To date, all active Mississippi River reintroductions have targeted marsh habitat. However, a 57 cubic meter per second (2,000...

Krauss, Ken W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Keim, Richard F.; Chambers, Jim L.; Wood, William B.; Hartley, Stephen B.
Krauss, K.W., Shaffer, G.P., Keim, R.F., Chambers, J.L., Wood, W.B., and Hartley, S.B., 2018, Expectations of Maurepas Swamp response to a river reintroduction, Louisiana: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2018–3072, 4 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20183072.

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Year Published: 2018

Preliminary peak stage and streamflow data for selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations in North and South Carolina for flooding following Hurricane Florence, September 2018

Hurricane Florence made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, shortly after dawn on September 14, 2018. Once over land, the forward motion of the hurricane slowed to about 2 to 3 miles per hour. Over the next several days, the hurricane delivered historic amounts of rainfall across North and South Carolina,...

Feaster, Toby D.; Weaver, J. Curtis; Gotvald, Anthony J.; Kolb, Katharine R.
Feaster, T.D., Weaver, J.C., Gotvald, A.J., and Kolb, K.R., 2018, Preliminary peak stage and streamflow data for selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations in North and South Carolina for flooding following Hurricane Florence, September 2018: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1172, 36 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181172.

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Year Published: 2018

Integrating encounter theory with decision analysis to evaluate collision risk and determine optimal protection zones for wildlife

1.Better understanding human‐wildlife interactions and their links with management can help improve the design of wildlife protection zones. One example is the problem of wildlife collisions with vehicles or human‐built structures (e.g. power lines, wind farms). In fact, collisions between marine wildlife and watercraft are among the major threats...

Udell, B.J.; Martin, Julien; Fletcher, R.J.; Bonneau, Mathieu; Edwards, Holly H.; Gowan, T.; Hardy, Stacie K.; Gurarie, E.; Calleson, C.S.; Deutsch, C.J.
Udell, B.J., Martin, J., Fletcher, R.J., Jr., Bonneau, M., Edwards, H., Gowan, T.,Hardy, S.K., Gurarie, E., Calleson, C.S., and Deutsch, C.J., 2018, Integrating encounter theory with decision analysis to evaluate collision risk and determine optimal protection zones for wildlife: Journal of Applied Ecology, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.13290.

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Year Published: 2018

Integrative taxonomy resolves taxonomic uncertainty for freshwater mussels being considered for protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act

Objectively delimiting species boundaries remains an important challenge in systematics and becomes urgent when unresolved taxonomy complicates conservation and recovery efforts. We examined species boundaries in the imperiled freshwater mussel genus Cyclonaias(Bivalvia: Unionidae) using morphometrics, molecular phylogenetics, and...

Johnson, Nathan A.; Smith, Chase H.; Pfeiffer, John M.; Randklev, Chalres R.; Williams, James D.; Austin, James D.
Johnson, N.A., Smith, C.H., Pfeiffer, J.M., III, Randklev, C.R., Williams, J.D. and Austin, J.D., 2018, Integrative taxonomy resolves taxonomic uncertainty for freshwater mussels being considered for protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act: Scientific Reports, v. 8, art. 15892, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33806-z.

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Year Published: 2018

Identifying management-relevant research priorities for responding to disease-associated amphibian declines

A research priority can be defined as a knowledge gap that, if resolved, identifies the optimal course of conservation action. We (a group of geographically distributed and multidisciplinary research scientists) used tools from nominal group theory and decision analysis to collaboratively identify and prioritize information...

Campbell Grant, Evan H.; Adams, M.J.; Fisher, Robert N.; Grear, Daniel A.; Halstead, Brian J.; Hossack, Blake R.; Muths, Erin L.; Richgels, Katherine L. D.; Russell, Robin E.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Walls, Susan C.; White, C. LeAnn
Grant, E. H. C., Adams, M. J., Fisher, R. N., Grear, D. A., Halstead, B. J., Hossack, B. R., Muths, E., Richgels, K. L. D., Russell, R. E., Smalling, K. L., Waddle, J. H., Walls, S. C., and White, C. L., 2018, Identifying management-relevant research priorities for responding to disease-associated amphibian declines: Global Ecology and Conservation, v. 16, article e00441, 9 p. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2018.e00441

Filter Total Items: 503
USGS
April 18, 2011

USGS Hydrologic Investigation of West Africa's Congo River (part 3)

USGS South Carolina Water Science Center Data Chief, John Shelton in a special hydrologic expedition down the Congo River, West Africa. Part three of the three part episode, reveals a hydrologic data set that changed the world record books.

Tangled web of prop roots from red mangrove trees, intermixed with black mangroves and white mangroves farther back in the photo
April 13, 2011

Mangrove forest, Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park

Tangled web of prop roots from red mangrove trees, intermixed with black mangroves and white mangroves farther back in the forest.  Mangrove forests cover much of the southwestern coastal region of Everglades National Park.  The red mangroves are the most salinity tolerant and grow with their prop roots in the water or within the range of high tide.

Rainbow Springs, Florida, USA
March 11, 2011

Spring water is usually clear and cool, which attracts swimmers.

Rainbow Springs, Florida, USA

A spring is a water resource formed when the side of a hill, a valley bottom or other excavation intersects a flowing body of groundwater at or below the local water table, below which the subsurface material is saturated with water. A spring is the result of an aquifer being filled to the point that the water overflows

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USGS CoreCast
March 6, 2011

Groundwater Awareness Week is March 6-12

Groundwater is not a single vast pool of underground water; rather, it is contained within a variety of aquifer systems. Each of these aquifers has its own set of questions and challenges. From large drawdowns in the Great Plains aquifer to arsenic in some wells in New England, this episode of CoreCast highlights six different USGS groundwater studies all across the United

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Image: Downtown Nashville
December 31, 2010

Downtown Nashville

Rivers in middle Tennessee crested May 2-3,2010, breaking records at many USGS-operated streamgages.The flood peak on the Cumberland River in downtown Nashville ranks as the highest observed during the past 73 years. Flooding on the Cumberland River damaged the Grand Ole Opry House, Bridgestone Arena, and other landmarks with several feet of water.

Photo of bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, with polyps extended, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa

Bleaching colony of great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, with polyps extended, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see

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bleaching colony of star coral
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colonies of mountainous star coral, Montastraea faveolata

Bleaching colonies of mountainous star coral, Montastraea faveolata, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

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Photo of bleaching colonies of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colonies of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides

Bleaching colonies of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, both green and brown color morphs, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of

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Photo of bleaching colony of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides

Bleaching colony of mustard hill coral, Porites astreoides, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when the

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Photo of bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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Photo of bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

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USGS
September 16, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey alerted state and federal agencies today to the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Maryland due to anticipated heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ivan.

USGS
September 16, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are closely watching the Gulf of Mexico shoreline to understand the impact of Hurricane Ivan. The shoreline in the Gulf is particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of the low elevation, shoreline retreat and subsidence in the Mississippi Delta regions.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 13, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are closely watching the long, thin barrier islands that comprise the Gulf of Mexico coast of west Florida as Hurricane Ivan approaches. These islands are particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of their low elevation. New elevation maps show just how vulnerable.

USGS
September 13, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are closely watching the long, thin barrier islands that comprise the Gulf of Mexico coast of west Florida as Hurricane Ivan approaches. These islands are particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of their low elevation. New elevation maps show just how vulnerable.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 9, 2004

Streamgages continue to measure new daily record high flows on waterways along the U.S. eastern seaboard as yet another hurricane promises to deliver more rain to parts of the already soggy region. Although flooding in the immediate Richmond area receded quickly earlier this week, the city may receive additional heavy rainfall from Frances in coming days. 

USGS
September 3, 2004

Streamgages continue to measure new daily record high flows on waterways along the U.S. eastern seaboard as yet another hurricane promises to deliver more rain to parts of the already soggy region.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 2, 2004

Based on airborne laser mapping data acquired in cooperation with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have estimated the coastal-change impacts that may be caused by Hurricane Frances as it makes landfall on the U.S. south Atlantic coast over the Labor Day weekend.

USGS
September 2, 2004

Based on airborne laser mapping data acquired in cooperation with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have estimated the coastal-change impacts that may be caused by Hurricane Frances as it makes landfall on the U.S. south Atlantic coast over the Labor Day weekend.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 4, 2004

Manatee populations are growing at healthy rates in two of four regions off Florida’s coast, but may be stalled or declining in the remaining regions, according to a recently released report by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
August 4, 2004

Manatee populations are growing at healthy rates in two of four regions off Florida’s coast, but may be stalled or declining in the remaining regions, according to a recently released report by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
July 14, 2004

Did you know that from your desk you can monitor the effect of this week’s heavy rains throughout the already saturated mid-Atlantic region? The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) WaterWatch Web site can show you what’s happening to streams in your local area and show you the places most affected by heavy rains expected from these storms.

USGS
June 7, 2004

A new assessment of shoreline change on the Gulf of Mexico, released today by the U.S. Geological Survey, shows that 61 percent of the Gulf Coast shoreline is eroding. Some areas are losing sand more rapidly than others and some areas are actually gaining sand.

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