Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program

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The Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program (GWSIP) serves as the national source of impartial, timely, rigorous, and relevant data for short- and long-term water decisions by stakeholders across the United States. In 2018, the USGS began piloting the Nation’s next-generation integrated water observing system that will provide high-fidelity, real-time data on water quantity and quality.

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Streamflow Conditions

Streamflow Conditions

WaterWatch

Groundwater Conditions

Groundwater Conditions

Groundwater Watch

News

Date published: March 26, 2019

The USGS Response to Record Flooding in the Midwest Continues

USGS crews continue fieldwork in response to the ongoing flooding in the Midwest. Nearly 70 USGS gages in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota are above minor flood stage with more rain forecast in the coming days.

Date published: March 4, 2019

USGS contributes to the Fourth National Climate Assessment

USGS Research Hydrologist Glenn Hodgkins co-authored the Fourth National Climate Assessment’s Northeast chapter. USGS Research Geologist Erika Lentz was also a co-author. The recently published chapter discusses historical and potential future impacts of climatic changes on New England’s people and natural resources, including it’s inland and coastal waters.

Date published: November 9, 2018

USGS Working to Restore Streamgages

For questions about a streamgage in your state, please contact your local USGS water science center; contacts can be found at https://water.usgs.gov/key_officials.html.

Publications

Year Published: 2019

Monitoring the pulse of our Nation's rivers and streams—The U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging network

In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, second Director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), proposed gaging the flow of rivers and streams in the Western United States to evaluate the potential for irrigation. Around the same time, several cities in the Eastern United States established primitive streamgages to help design water-supply systems....

Eberts, Sandra M.; Woodside, Michael D.; Landers, Mark N.; Wagner, Chad R.
Eberts, S.M., Woodside, M.D., Landers, M.N., and Wagner, C.R., 2018, Monitoring the pulse of our Nation's rivers and streams—The U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging network: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2018–3081, 2 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20183081.

Year Published: 2018

Time series of high-resolution images enhances efforts to monitor post-fire condition and recovery, Waldo Canyon fire, Colorado, USA

Interpretations of post-fire condition and rates of vegetation recovery can influence management priorities, actions and perception of latent risks from landslides and floods. In this study, we used the Waldo Canyon fire (2012, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA) as a case study to explore how a time series (2011–2016) of high-resolution images can...

Vanderhoof, Melanie K.; Burt, Clifton; Hawbaker, Todd J.
Vanderhoof, M.K., Burt, C., Hawbaker, T.J. 2018. Time series of high-resolution images enhances efforts to monitor post-fire condition and recovery, Waldo Canyon fire, Colorado, USA. International Journal of Wildland Fire, doi:10.1071/WF17177.

Year Published: 2018

Efficient delineation of nested depression hierarchy in digital elevation models for hydrological analysis using level-set method

In terrain analysis and hydrological modeling, surface depressions (or sinks) in a digital elevation model (DEM) are commonly treated as artifacts and thus filled and removed to create a depressionless DEM. Various algorithms have been developed to identify and fill depressions in DEMs during the past decades. However, few studies have attempted...

Wu, Qiusheng; Lane, Charles R.; Wang, Lei; Vanderhoof, Melanie K.; Christensen, Jay R.; Liu, Hongxing
Wu, Q., C.R. Lane, L. Wang, M.K. Vanderhoof, J.R. Christensen, and H. Liu. 2018. “Efficient Delineation of Nested Depression Hierarchy in Digital Elevation Models for Hydrological Analysis Using Level-Set Method.” Journal of the American Water Resources Association 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1111/1752-1688.12689.