Astrogeology Science Center

Education

Filter Total Items: 10
Date published: May 13, 2019
Status: Completed

Baerbel Lucchitta

Dr. Baerbel Lucchitta was one of the first women in the field of Astrogeology. She started her career by mapping the Moon and instructing the Apollo Astronauts. She worked extensively on the Valles Marineris canyons on Mars, is a vigorous protagonist of glacial flow and other ice-related features on Mars, and was awarded the Geological Society of America, Planetary Geology Division, G.K....

Date published: September 21, 2018
Status: Completed

RPIF Online Exhibits

The NASA/USGS RPIF is dedicated to providing online exhibits of archived materials. The RPIF houses a large collection of historical artifacts in relation to space exploration, map-making, and planetary geology.

Contacts: Amy Zink
Date published: September 19, 2018
Status: Completed

RPIF Pioneers of Astrogeology

Some of the pioneers in planetary geologic research include Eugene Shoemaker, Harrison "Jack" Schmitt, Don Wilhelms, Raymond Batson, David Roddy, Gordon Swann and Baerbel Lucchitta. Click on the images below to learn about each person and their contributions to Astrogeology.

Contacts: Amy Zink
Date published: September 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Gordan Alfred Swann

Gordon Alfred Swann was born in Palisade, CO, September 21, 1931. After serving in the U.S. Navy from 1952 to 1956, he received a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado in 1962 as one of the pioneers in a study of the Precambrian geology of the Front Range of Colorado. His career in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began in Denver in 1963 working on a Defense Department...

Date published: September 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Dave Roddy

Dave Roddy was a world-renowned scientist at the forefront of investigators studying impact and explosion craters. His field mapping of Flynn Creek was the first mapping detailed enough to demonstrate the impact origin of an ancient structure in North America. David was an authority on the Meteor Crater impact structure, east of Flagstaff. Dave's work has assisted in the...

Date published: September 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Raymond Milner Batson

Ray Batson was born in Lincoln, Nebraska, on 8 July 1931. His lifelong passion for flying surfaced early. In high school he worked at Stapleton Airfield in Denver refueling planes in order to pay for flying lessons, and obtained his private pilot’s license. After a year of study at Regis College, he enlisted in the United States Air Force and served a two-year tour of duty as...

Date published: September 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Don Wilhelms

With his geologic mapping of the Moon, Don Wilhelms set the methods and standards for planetary mapping. He is author of Geologic History of the Moon (1987, USGS Professional Paper 1348) and To a Rocky Moon, A Geologist's History of Lunar Exploration (1993, University of Arizona Press), as well as many other science publications and planetary geologic maps. Don helped train...

Date published: September 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Harrison H. Schmitt

Jack Schmitt joined the Astrogeology team as a geologist at the Flagstaff Science Center in 1964, having recently earned a doctorate degree from Harvard University. In addition to assisting in the geologic mapping of the Moon, he led the Lunar Field Geological Methods project. When NASA announced a special recruitment for scientist-astronauts in late 1964, Schmitt...

Date published: September 17, 2018
Status: Completed

Gene Shoemaker - Founder of Astrogeology

He once said he considered himself a scientific historian, one whose mission in life is to relate geologic and planetary events in a perspective manner. A modest statement coming from a legend of a man who almost single-handedly created planetary science as a discipline distinct from astronomy. He brought together geologic principles to the mapping of planets, resulting in...

Date published: September 17, 2018
Status: Completed

1961: USGS Astrogeology's First Published Map

The race to the moon began on August 17, 1958, and the Soviet Union won. This isn't the opening line of an alternate history story; rather, it is an acknowledgment that more than one moon race took place. The first, with the goal of launching a small automated spacecraft to the moon, began with the liftoff of the Able 1 lunar orbiter, a 38-kilogram U.S. Air Force (USAF) probe...