Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Management and Restoration

Understanding how ecosystems work and how chemical, geological, hydrological, and biological processes interact and change with human and natural alterations

Filter Total Items: 50
Date published: June 28, 2018
Status: Active

Quantifying ecosystem services provided by depressional wetlands in the Upper Mississippi

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center has conducted multiple research efforts related to developing methodology for quantifying the environmental and societal services provided by prairie-pothole wetland ecosystems. In this effort, we are exploring the feasibility of applying methodologies similar to those developed wetland ecosystems within the Prairie Pothole Region to other landscapes...

Contacts: David Mushet
Date published: June 28, 2018
Status: Active

Quantify the multiple services performed by wetland ecosystems in the Prairie Pothole Region of the United States

This research effort is focused on incorporating land-use and land-cover change into forecasting models that accounted for variations in agricultural and conservation practices and programs. The primary tool being used is the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) modeling suite. We have parameterized this modeling tool for the prairie-pothole region, and developed...

Contacts: David Mushet
Date published: June 28, 2018
Status: Completed

Description of aquatic vegetation and invertebrate communities at Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge is situated within a riverine system where refuge wetlands receive sediment-laden inflows that have been associated with diminished plant communities and water quality conditions. Accordingly, improved habitat- and water-quality conditions have been recognized as overall management goals, and the collection of baseline biotic and abiotic data has been...

Contacts: Brian Tangen
Date published: June 28, 2018
Status: Completed

Assessment of pattern tile drainage on wetland hydrology and ecosystem services in the Prairie Pothole Region

Prairie Pothole Region wetlands provide numerous ecological services to society such as wildlife habitat, water storage, and carbon sequestration. Agricultural production in the region has been enhanced through the expanded installation and use of subsurface drainage systems, but these systems may have a negative impact on the region’s wetlands, including those protected by conservation...

Contacts: Brian Tangen
Date published: June 28, 2018
Status: Active

Development, application, and refinement of a systems model fo prairie wetlands

NPWRC is developing, applying, and refining an integrated, process-based, systems model for prairie-pothole wetlands to facilitate forecasts of how climate and land-use change will affect wetland processes and biota. The Pothole Hydrology Linked System Simulator model (PHyLiSS) simulates changes in hydrology, water chemistry, plant communities, invertebrates, and other biota as a result of...

Date published: June 28, 2018
Status: Active

Development and validation of wetland-connectivity indicators in the U.S. Prairie Pothole Region

We are working in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to (1) quantify cumulative effects of prairie-pothole wetlands on stream communities; (2) explore relationships between aquatic-system connectivity and genetic-, species-, and ecosystem-scale biological diversity at watershed and landscape scales; (3) develop mapping unit descriptors based on biotic community traits...

Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Understanding consequences of management strategies for farmed wetlands to ecosystem services in the Prairie Pothole Region

NPWRC is leading a partnership with North Dakota State University to examine ecological, social, and financial considerations of farming practices within temporarily-ponded wetlands. There has been a long history of cropping prairie pothole wetlands which are embedded within farm fields. Often wet conditions during spring or summer prevent farmers from getting a harvestable yield from these...

Contacts: Michael Anteau
Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Restoration of wetland invertebrates to improve wildlife habitat in Minnesota

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) is investigating limitations to restoring abundant aquatic macroinvertebrate populations to Minnesota wetlands and shallow lakes. Recent research on larger more permanent wetlands in Minnesota indicates that there have been decreases in quality of wetlands of use by ducks. That research also describes a decline in abundance of amphipods, a...

Contacts: Michael Anteau
Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Importance of wetlands in intensively farmed landscapes to duck production

The Prairie Pothole Region of the northern Great Plains annually hosts 50–80% of North America’s ducks during the breeding season. Accordingly, there are significant government and private funds that go to conservation for the purposes of improving duck production in the region. The Prairie Pothole Region ecosystem has a number of stressors, intensive agriculture being chief among them. The...

Contacts: Michael Anteau
Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Completed

Interactions of consolidation drainage and climate on water-level dynamics, wetland productivity, and waterbirds

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) recently completed a project aimed at understanding the impacts of wetland drainage on wetlands that receive drainage water. The biological communities of prairie pothole wetlands evolved in a hydrologically dynamic system due to periodic wet and dry conditions.  NPWRC research indicates that relative to wetlands in undrained landscapes,...

Contacts: Michael Anteau
Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluating wetland ecosystem health using real-time nutrient dynamics of ducks

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) leads a collaborative effort, spanning several studies, with the objective of improving techniques to assess the quality of spring migration habitat for ducks. Spring is a critical time in in the life cycle of migratory ducks because during migration they experience peak energetic needs at a time when food resources are often at their scarcest...

Contacts: Michael Anteau
Date published: June 27, 2018
Status: Active

Interaction of land use and wet/dry cycles on invertebrate populations of northern prairie wetlands: implications for waterbird habitat conservation

This effort is aimed at understanding how productivity of larger and more permanent wetlands is influenced by a combination of inter-annual hydrological dynamics and land-use impacts. Historically, aquatic-invertebrates productivity and abundance was driven by inter-annual hydrological dynamics because drying periods allow for nutrient cycling and a subsequent pulse of productivity when wet...

Contacts: Michael Anteau