Carbon Dioxide as an Asian Carp Behavioral Deterrent

Science Center Objects

Asian Carp Control: Carbon Dioxide

Introduction of Asian carps into public waters of the United States has resulted in a large effort to limit dispersal beyond the Mississippi River watershed. Navigational structures positioned throughout most major rivers are potential pinch-points to block further range expansion into new areas. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is being evaluated as fish deterrent to reduce fish passage through navigational locks that would also not directly interfere with vessel passages and lock operations.

USGS and USFWS personnel preparing to electro fish for common carp near Kaukauna, WI.

 USGS and FWS personnel preparing to electro fish for common carp near Kaukauna, Wisconsin.

(Public domain.)

The goal of this project is to characterize fish behavior when exposed to a CO2. More specifically, we are studying fish behavior to determine if CO2 could be applied to deter Asian carps from locations (e.g. lock chambers) where they are at risk to move upstream. Studies are conducted in laboratory, outdoor pond, and field settings using acoustic telemetry, hydroacoustic sonar, and underwater cameras to monitor fish behavior. Results are intended to inform natural resource decisions related to the integration of CO2 as a new control tool to better manage Asian carps.

 

Evaluation of CO2 as a fish deterrent at a water management structure along the Illinois River.

Evaluation of CO2 as a fish deterrent at a water management structure along the Illinois River.

(Public domain.)

Manifold system to evaluate CO2 as a fish deterrent in Morris, Illinois

Manifold system to evaluate CO2 as a fish deterrent in Morris, Illinois

(Public domain.)

USGS scientist monitoring invasive round goby movements in response to CO2 using a shuttle box system.

USGS scientist monitoring invasive round goby movements in response to CO2 using a shuttle box system.

(Public domain.)

Water sample collection during CO2 injection at a water management structure along the Illinois River.

Water sample collection during CO2 injection at a water management structure along the Illinois River.

(Public domain.)