Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

River Ecology

The River Ecology program focuses their research on; providing information on the overall structure and function of aquatic ecosystems; providing specific information on available resources; and evaluating various management, consveration, and restoration practices, to determine how such practices affect aquatic ecosystems.

Filter Total Items: 8
Date published: February 6, 2018
Status: Active

Spatial Patterns of Native Freshwater Mussels in the Upper Mississippi River

Impact of UMESC Science

This research aims to quantify spatial patterns of adult and juvenile (≤5 y of age) freshwater mussels across multiple scales based on systematic survey data from 4 reaches of the Upper Mississippi River (Navigation Pools 3, 5, 6, and 18). Resource managers can use this critical information about spatial structure to make informed river management decisions.   ...

Contacts: Teresa J Newton
Date published: July 20, 2017
Status: Active

Distribution and Controls Over Habitat and Food Web Structures and Processes in Great Lakes Estuaries

Rivermouth ecosystems, or freshwater estuaries, are the focus of human and wildlife interactions with the Great Lakes. They are highly valued as the region’s urban, industrial, shipping and recreational centers; and home to recreational harbors, wildlife viewing and production, beaches and urban riverfronts. Rivermouths are also both the mixing zones where nutrients from upstream watersheds...

Date published: July 18, 2017
Status: Active

River Productivity

Biological production represents the total amount of living material (biomass) that was produced during a defined period of time. This production is important because some of it is used for food and some is valued for recreation, it is a direct measure of total ecosystem processes, and it sustains biological diversity. Production is a measure of energy flow, and is therefore a natural currency...

Date published: July 17, 2017
Status: Active

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service - Comprehensive Conservation Plan

The Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has been entrusted to manage our nation’s critical wetland resources. Due to conversion in industrial, residential, and agricultural uses, these wetlands have been disappearing at an alarming rate over the last one-hundred years. In order to better care for these resources, all of the refuges are developing long-term Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCP...

Contacts: Larry Robinson
Date published: July 3, 2017
Status: Completed

Movement Patterns of Native Mussels in the Upper Mississippi River: Response to Water Level Management

Impact of UMESC Science

This research aims to estimate the fraction of mussels that are able to avoid short-term mortality during a water level drawdown by burrowing or moving horizontally into deeper water. Resource managers can use this critical information about mussel behavior and survival to make informed river management decisions.   

Contacts: Teresa J Newton
Date published: June 13, 2017
Status: Active

Population Assessment and Potential Functional Roles of Native Mussels in the Upper Mississippi River

Impact of UMESC Science

The results of this study suggest that native mussels play an integral role in this ecosystem by sequestering large volumes of suspended materials that can be used by other benthic organisms.
 

Managers now have critical data on population size, distribution, and relative health—these data are being used to guide habitat restoration activities to...

Contacts: Teresa J Newton
Date published: June 8, 2017
Status: Active

Comparison of Native Mussel Assemblages Among Three Reaches of the Upper Mississippi River

In the past century about 20 mussel species have become extinct from the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) basin, and at least 28 species are state or federally listed.  The species composition appears to have changed considerably from pre-European settlement times toward communities dominated by mussels that are tolerant of pollution and can utilize many different types of habitats.  River...

Contacts: Teresa J Newton
Date published: June 8, 2017
Status: Active

Modeling the Response of Imperiled Freshwater Mussels to Anthropogenically Induced Changes in Water Temperature, Habitat, and Flow in Streams of the Southeastern and Central United States

Freshwater mussels are in serious global decline and urgently need protection and conservation.  Declines in the abundance and diversity of North American mussels have been attributed to a wide array of human activities that cause pollution, water-quality degradation, and habitat destruction.  Recent findings suggest that many mussel species are already living close to their upper thermal...

Contacts: Teresa J Newton