Upper Midwest Water Science Center

Maps

The Upper Midwest Water Science Center performs scientific spatial analyses and creates full-featured, web-based database applications, data visualizations, and decision support tools. We use our collective expertise in cartography, science, and web technology to create custom products that are practical, intuitive, and focused on our cooperators’ needs.

Web Informatics and Mapping

Web Informatics and Mapping

Web Informatics and Mapping (WIM) develops web-based tools that support USGS science and other federal science initiatives.

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National Water Information System (NWIS) Mapper

National Water Information System (NWIS) Mapper

The NWIS mapper provides access to over 1.5 million sites where current and historical surface-water, groundwater, springs, and atmospheric data has been collected.

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USGS Topo Maps

USGS Topo Maps

Access current and historical topographic maps and digital data.

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Filter Total Items: 27
Date published: March 5, 2019

WaterWatch (surface water)

WaterWatch displays maps, graphs, and tables describing real-time, recent, and past streamflow conditions for the United States, including flood and droughts. Real-time information generally is updated on an hourly basis.

Date published: March 5, 2019

Hydrologic Unit Maps

The U.S. is sub-divided into successively smaller hydrologic units which are classified into four levels: regions, sub-regions, accounting units, and cataloging units. Each unit is identified by a unique hydrologic unit code (HUC) consisting of two to eight digits based on its classification. This site provides information and data for current and historical hydrologic units, names, and numbers.

Date published: March 5, 2019

USGS Flood Event Viewer

During large, short-term events, the USGS collects streamflow and additional data (including storm tide, wave height, high-water marks, and additional sensor deployments) to aid in documenting flood events. The USGS Flood Event Viewer provides convenient, map-based access to downloadable event-based data.

Date published: March 5, 2019

USGS Mobile Water Data

The USGS Mobile Water Data site highlights USGS current conditions water data in a mobile-friendly website, allowing users to monitor conditions at a favorite river or stream or locate nearby monitoring locations. All USGS current conditions water data is available.

Date published: March 5, 2019

Federal Priority Streamgages (FPS)

This mapper identifies USGS Federal Priority Streamgages (FPS). FPS are monitoring stations that track the amount of water in streams and rivers across the Nation to meet long-term federal information needs. They are strategically positioned to serve as a backbone for the larger National Streamflow Network that is operated in cooperation with over 1,200 federal, state, tribal, and local agencies.

Date published: March 5, 2019

Endangered, Discontinued, and Rescued Stations

This mapper identifies USGS streamgages that are in danger of being discontinued or converted to a reduced level of service due to lack of funding, gages that already have been discontinued, and gages that have been ‘rescued’ by a new funding source.

Date published: March 5, 2019

Principal Aquifers of the United States

A principal aquifer is defined as a regionally extensive aquifer or aquifer system that has the potential to be used as a source of potable water. This site provides downloadable maps (Ground Water Atlas of the United States, 2003) and spatial data (National Atlas, 2014) for the principal aquifers and aquifers of alluvial and glacial origin of the U.S.

Date published: March 4, 2019

Dissolved Solids Sources, Loads, and Yields For the Conterminous U.S.

Using the SPARROW (SPAtially-Referenced Regression on Watershed Attributes) model, long-term mean annual conditions for dissolved-solids sources, loads, and yields were predicted for nearly 66,000 stream reaches and their corresponding incremental catchments that drain the Nation.

Date published: November 20, 2017

GLRI Urban Stormwater Monitoring: Assessing stormwater reduction using green infrastructure (story map)

The GLRI Urban Stormwater Monitoring effort brings together the expertise of the USGS with local and national partners to assess the ability of green infrastructure to reduce stormwater runoff in Great Lakes urban areas. This story map discusses the problem with stormwater, the potential benefits and challenges of green infrastructure, and how this effort is evaluating its effectiveness.

Date published: July 1, 2017

Measuring the July 2016 flood in northern Wisconsin and the Bad River Reservation

On July 11-12, 2016, severe thunderstorms hit northern Wisconsin, resulting in widespread flooding. Immediately following the flood, the USGS and the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians began collecting evidence of peak flood levels. USGS scientists used these high-water marks, along with streamflow and lake level, to reconstruct the extent and depth of flood inundation.

Date published: November 19, 2016

FishVis Mapper

The FishVis Mapper is the product of an Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC project, “A Regional Decision Support Tool for Identifying Vulnerabilities of Riverine Habitat and Fishes to Climate Change” that developed an approach for predicting fish species occurrence under current climate conditions and project how fish species occurrence may change under future climate conditions.

Date published: September 15, 2016

Michigan Lake Water Clarity Interactive Map Viewer

Available online are estimated Secchi-disk transparency (eSDT) and corresponding estimated trophic state index (eTSI) values for Michigan inland lakes. To view available eSDT for Michigan inland lakes greater than 20 acres without interference from clouds, cloud shadows, dense vegetation or shoreline, go to the Michigan Lake Water Clarity Interactive Map Viewer.