How many Burmese pythons inhabit southern Florida?

Tens of thousands of invasive Burmese pythons are estimated to be present in the Everglades.

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Where are Burmese pythons or other large constrictors distributed in Florida?

The Burmese python is now distributed across more than a thousand square miles of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park and areas to the north including Big Cypress National Preserve and Collier-Seminole State Forest. A number of Burmese pythons have been found in the Florida Keys, but there is not yet confirmation of a...

How many Burmese pythons inhabit southern Florida?

Tens of thousands of invasive Burmese pythons are estimated to be present in the Everglades.

What should I do if I see a python in the wild?

If you see a python in the wild – or suspect that a snake is a python or an invasive snake – you should take the same precautions for these constrictor snakes as one would take for alligators: avoid interacting with or getting close to them. If you are in Everglades National Park, you can report a python sighting to a park ranger. You can also...

How have invasive pythons impacted Florida ecosystems?

Non-native Burmese pythons have established a breeding population in South Florida and are one of the most concerning invasive species in Everglades National Park. Pythons compete with native wildlife for food, which includes mammals, birds, and other reptiles. Severe mammal declines in Everglades National Park have been linked to Burmese pythons...

Are large constrictor snakes such as Burmese pythons able to kill people? What is the risk?  Would this be in the wild, or in backyards?

Human fatalities from non-venomous snakes are very rare, probably averaging one or two per year worldwide. All known constrictor-snake fatalities in the United States are from captive snakes; these are split between deaths of snake owners who were purposefully interacting with their pet and deaths of small children or infants in homes where a...

Can invasive pythons be eradicated?

The odds of eradicating an introduced population of reptiles once it has spread across a large area are very low, pointing to the importance of prevention, early detection and rapid response. And with the Burmese python now distributed across more than a thousand square miles of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park and areas...

Could invasive pythons move into cities?

Boa constrictors and northern African pythons live in or adjacent to the Miami metropolitan area, and in their native ranges various python species and the boa constrictor are often found living in suburban and urban areas. As with alligators, the risk of human attack in urban areas is very low but not absent.
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Date published: August 21, 2018

Genetic Analysis of Florida's Invasive Pythons Reveals A Tangled Family Tree

A new genetic analysis of invasive pythons captured across South Florida finds the big constrictors are closely related to one another. In fact, most of them are genetically related as first or second cousins, according to a study by wildlife genetics experts at the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: November 1, 2016

Grappling with Pythons in Florida

In 2003, wildlife scientists carrying out regular nighttime road surveys in Everglades National Park started to see fewer medium-sized mammals. Over the next few years, rabbits disappeared completely, and populations of foxes, raccoons, possums, bobcats, and white-tailed deer were either small or absent.

Date published: September 22, 2016

Burmese Python Hatchlings Seen on Key Largo

Burmese pythons have been found on Key Largo.

Date published: April 28, 2015

Burmese Python Habitat Use Patterns May Help Control Efforts

EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Fla.— The largest and longest Burmese Python tracking study of its kind -- here or in its native range -- is providing researchers and resource managers new information that may help target control efforts of this invasive snake, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: March 19, 2014

Invasive Burmese Pythons Are Good Navigators and Can Find Their Way Home

Invasive Burmese pythons in South Florida are able to find their way home even when moved far away from their capture locations, a finding that has implications for the spread of the species.

Attribution: Ecosystems, Southeast
Date published: February 27, 2014

Burmese Pythons Pose Little Risk to People in Everglades

The estimated tens of thousands of Burmese pythons now populating the Everglades present a low risk to people in the park, according to a new assessment byU.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service scientists.

Attribution: Ecosystems, Southeast
Date published: January 30, 2012

Severe Declines in Everglades Mammals Linked to Pythons

HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- Precipitous declines in formerly common mammals in Everglades National Park have been linked to the presence of invasive Burmese pythons, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

Date published: January 4, 2012

Salt Water Alone Unlikely to Halt Burmese Python Invasion

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- Invasive Burmese python hatchlings from the Florida Everglades can withstand exposure to salt water long enough to potentially expand their range through ocean and estuarine environments, according to research in the latest issue of the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology.

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American Alligator and Burmese Python in a Struggle
February 1, 2017

American Alligator and Burmese Python in a Struggle

An American alligator and a Burmese python locked in a struggle to prevail in Everglades National Park. This python appears to be losing, but snakes in similar situations have apparently escaped unharmed, and in other situations pythons have eaten alligators. Photograph credit: Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service

Invasive Burmese Python
February 1, 2017

Invasive Burmese Python

Invasive Burmese python in the Greater Everglades Photograph credit: Brian Smith, USGS

Implanting a Radio Transmitter in a Burmese Python
February 1, 2017

Implanting a Radio Transmitter in a Burmese Python

Researchers implant a radio transmitter in a 16-foot, 155-pound female Burmese python at the South Florida Research Center, Everglades National Park. Photograph credit: Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service

Burmese Python
February 1, 2017

Burmese Python

USGS researchers handle a Burmese python in the Everglades. Credit: USGS

A Burmese python slithering in the grass in the Everglades.
November 3, 2016

A Burmese python slithering in the grass in the Everglades.

A Burmese python slithering in the grass in the Everglades. 

A Burmese python stretched out in the grass in the Everglades.
October 27, 2016

A Burmese python stretched out in the grass in the Everglades.

A Burmese python stretched out in the grass in the Everglades.

A Burmese python coiled in the grass in the Everglades.
October 27, 2016

A Burmese python coiled in the grass in the Everglades.

A Burmese python coiled in the grass in the Everglades.

An Everglades Park ranger holds a Burmese Python by the tail.
October 4, 2016

An Everglades Park ranger holds a Burmese Python by the tail.

An Everglades Park ranger holds a Burmese Python by the tail. 

Burmese python swimming
April 6, 2016

Burmese python swimming

Burmese python swimming