Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Newberry

Find U.S. Volcano

Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island (about 3100 km2 or 1200 mi2). 

Quick Facts

Location: Oregon; Deschutes, Klamath and Lake Counties

Latitude: 43.722° N

Longitude: 121.229° W

Elevation: 2,434 (m) 7,986 (f)

Volcano type: Shield-shaped

Composition: Basalt to Rhyolite

Most recent eruption: 1,300 years ago

Nearby towns: Sunriver, Bend, LaPine, Redmond

Threat Potential: Very High*

*based on the National Volcano Early Warning System

Summary

Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over the past 400,000 years. Throughout its eruptive history, Newberry has produced ash and tephra, pyroclastic flows, and lava flows that range in composition from basalt to rhyolite. About 75,000 years ago a major explosive eruption and collapse event created a large volcanic depression at its summit that now hosts two caldera lakes. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it is still an active volcano.

News

link

Volcano Watch — Newberry Volcano is an impressive but unappreciated giant

link

Slight uptick in earthquakes at Newberry Volcano (March 24-April 3, 2022)

link

Newberry gets new names for some of its many geologic features.

Publications

2018 update to the U.S. Geological Survey national volcanic threat assessment

When erupting, all volcanoes pose a degree of risk to people and infrastructure, however, the risks are not equivalent from one volcano to another because of differences in eruptive style and geographic location. Assessing the relative threats posed by U.S. volcanoes identifies which volcanoes warrant the greatest risk-mitigation efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners. This update

Authors
John W. Ewert, Angela K. Diefenbach, David W. Ramsey

Science

Deformation Monitoring at Newberry

Ground deformation refers to any change in shape of the volcano, which can occur as a result of uplift or subsidence, stretching or contraction, or some combination of these types of movements.
link

Deformation Monitoring at Newberry

Ground deformation refers to any change in shape of the volcano, which can occur as a result of uplift or subsidence, stretching or contraction, or some combination of these types of movements.
Learn More

Earthquake Monitoring at Newberry Volcano

Newberry Volcano was once thought to be one of the most seismically quiet of the monitored volcanoes in Washington and Oregon before a major seismic network upgrade in 2011. Since the new stations were installed, there have been an average of 10-15 earthquakes located per year by the PNSN within the caldera.
link

Earthquake Monitoring at Newberry Volcano

Newberry Volcano was once thought to be one of the most seismically quiet of the monitored volcanoes in Washington and Oregon before a major seismic network upgrade in 2011. Since the new stations were installed, there have been an average of 10-15 earthquakes located per year by the PNSN within the caldera.
Learn More

Hazards Summary for Newberry Volcano

Newberry may appear to be a sleeping volcano, but it is doing what volcanoes normally do by maintaining long periods of quiet that are punctuated by occasional eruptions.
link

Hazards Summary for Newberry Volcano

Newberry may appear to be a sleeping volcano, but it is doing what volcanoes normally do by maintaining long periods of quiet that are punctuated by occasional eruptions.
Learn More