Cascades Volcano Observatory

Multimedia

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August 7, 2016

GeoGirls: Five days of discovery at Mount St. Helens

Twenty middle-school girls from Washington and Oregon participated in the 2016 “GeoGirls” outdoor volcano science program at Mount St. Helens, jointly organized by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Mount St. Helens Institute. 

The GeoGirls spent five days conducting hands-on research and interacting with scientists, educators, and older students, learning about

Mount St. Helens earthquake record during times of magma recharge....
May 4, 2016

Mount St. Helens earthquake record during times of magma recharge.

The top plot is the number of located earthquakes per week from the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network's catalog. The bottom plot shows the earthquake depths with time. Earthquakes are plotted as circles with the size of the circle corresponding to the magnitude of the earthquake (see legend). Both plots show the time period from 1987 to September 2004, and 2008 to May 4

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Earthquakes at Mount St. Helens from March 14, 2016 through May 4, ...
May 4, 2016

Earthquakes at Mount St. Helens from Mar. 14, 2016 - May 4, 2017

Map view plot of earthquakes located by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network from March 14, 2016 through May 4, 2016. Only high-quality locations are shown (8 or more observations with a 130 degree gap or less between observing stations).

USGS-CVO crew digs out Mount St. Helens' September Lobe monitoring ...
March 30, 2016

USGS-CVO crew digs out Mount St. Helens' Sep. Lobe monitoring station.

During the first few days of Mount St. Helen's earthquake swarm in March 2016, the September Lobe monitoring station (located on the 1980-86 dome) was buried in deep snow and not transmitting data. USGS-Cascades Volcano Observatory Technicians Kelly Swinford and Amberlee Darold dug out the station on March 30, restoring data flow and improving our ability to monitor the

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Group of women and girls looking at Mount St. Helens in the distance
December 31, 2015

USGS scientist and GeoGirls viewing Mount St. Helens

USGS scientists Kate Allstadt and Cynthia Gardner tell the story of the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens and how the catastrophic landslide, lateral blast, and lahar changed the landscape.

 Land Remote Sensing Image of Mount St. Helens on May 22, 1983
May 20, 2015

Land Remote Sensing Image of Mount St. Helens on May 22, 1983

Land Remote Sensing Image of Mount St. Helens on May 22, 1983. The volcanic blast on May 18, 1980, devastated more than 150 square miles of forest within a few minutes. In this Landsat false-color images, forest appears as bright red interspersed with patches of logging. Snow appears white, and ash is gray.

 

Before the eruption, Mount St. Helens towered

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December 31, 2014

Continuous Gas Monitoring Tracks Volcanic Activity at Mount St. Helens

Volcano gas geochemistry has been around for a long time. Scientists can make gas measurements using very large, very expensive Correlation Spectrometers or collect samples in the field and bring them back for analysis in the lab. But it’s possible we’re missing out on a lot of information because our monitoring capabilities don’t include continuous observation.

To

USGS scientist waits for helicopter pick-up in the crater of Mount ...
October 9, 2014

USGS scientist waits for helicopter pick-up in Mount St. Helens crater

USGS-CVO Research Geologist Peter Kelly communicates with the helicopter pilot and prepares for pick-up, on the new dome within the crater of Mount St. Helens.

USGS researchers use geophysical methods to locate groundwater at M...
September 15, 2014

Locate groundwater at Mount St. Helens

USGS researcher Jeff Wynn monitors in-coming data at the CSAMT (Controlled-Source Audio-Magnetotellurics ) receiver site on Mount St. Helens. The data will be used to locate the top of the groundwater system beneath the site.

Monitoring station inside the crater of Mount St. Helens "sniffs" v...
August 26, 2014

MultiGAS monitoring station inside crater of Mount St. Helens

The new volcanic-gas monitoring station installed at Mount St. Helens consists of weather monitoring equipment and sensors for measuring the concentrations of water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in volcanic gas plumes. Inside the fiberglass hut is the gas-monitoring equipment, a radio to send data back to the Cascades

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