Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Cooperative Research Units

Established in 1935, our mission is our hallmark: meet the actionable science needs of our cooperators, provide technical assistance, and develop the future workforce through graduate education/mentoring. The Coop Units are located on 40 universities in 38 states. They are called Coop Units because each cooperator plays a role in the staffing, funding and directing the units. 

News

link

How Can Managers Respond to Changing Ecosystems?

link

Northern Spotted Owl Still Fights for Survival

link

Friday's Findings - October 1 2021

Publications

Stoneflies in the genus Lednia (Plecoptera: Nemouridae): Sentinels of climate change impacts on mountain stream biodiversity

Rapid recession of glaciers and snowfields is threatening the habitats of cold-water biodiversity worldwide. In many ice-sourced headwaters of western North America, stoneflies in the genus Lednia (Plecoptera: Nemouridae) are a prominent member of the invertebrate community. With a broad distribution in mountain streams and close ties to declining glacier cover, Lednia has emerged as a sentinel of

Effects of environmental clutter on synthesized chiropteran echolocation signals in an anechoic chamber

Ultrasonic bat detectors are useful for research and monitoring purposes to assess occupancy and relative activity of bat communities. Environmental “clutter” such as tree boles and foliage can affect the recording quality and identification of bat echolocation calls collected using ultrasonic detectors. It can also affect the transmission of calls and recognition by bats when using acoustic lure

RAD adaptive management for transforming ecosystems

Intensifying global change is propelling many ecosystems toward irreversible transformations. Natural resource managers face the complex task of conserving these important resources under unprecedented conditions and expanding uncertainty. As once familiar ecological conditions disappear, traditional management approaches that assume the future will reflect the past are becoming increasingly unten

Science

The statistical power to detect regional temporal trends in riverine contaminants in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Issue: Chemical contamination of riverine ecosystems is a global concern, with potentially negative effects for human and ecological health. Land management activities (e.g., Best Management Practices; BMPs) are an important tool that can be used to reduce point and non-point sources of pollution. The Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) has goals for (1) reducing toxic contaminants and (2) reducing...
link

The statistical power to detect regional temporal trends in riverine contaminants in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Issue: Chemical contamination of riverine ecosystems is a global concern, with potentially negative effects for human and ecological health. Land management activities (e.g., Best Management Practices; BMPs) are an important tool that can be used to reduce point and non-point sources of pollution. The Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) has goals for (1) reducing toxic contaminants and (2) reducing...
Learn More

Decline of Beluga Whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska

In conjunction with the Cook Inlet PhotoID Project and federal agencies, the USGS Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is aiming to learn more about the fundamental factors that drive changes in beluga whale population dynamics, specifically what affects the rates at which individuals survive and reproduce.
link

Decline of Beluga Whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska

In conjunction with the Cook Inlet PhotoID Project and federal agencies, the USGS Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is aiming to learn more about the fundamental factors that drive changes in beluga whale population dynamics, specifically what affects the rates at which individuals survive and reproduce.
Learn More

New Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Established in Nevada

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Wildlife Management Institute (WMI) recently signed a cooperative agreement to establish a new Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at UNR.
link

New Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Established in Nevada

The Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Wildlife Management Institute (WMI) recently signed a cooperative agreement to establish a new Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at UNR.
Learn More