California Water Science Center

Measuring and Monitoring

Basic hydrologic data collection, processing, analysis, dissemination, and archiving are major parts of the California Water Science Center program. Streamflow data, for example, are used for flood and water-supply forecasts, planning and design, river regulation, streamflow statistics, and research investigations. Much of the data are available on a near-real-time basis by satellite telemetry.

Filter Total Items: 140
Date published: October 26, 2018
Status: Active

Reservoir Sedimentation Related to Wildfire in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California

Reservoirs naturally fill with sediment transported from the upstream watershed. As reservoirs fill with sediment, the amount of available water decreases for functions such as water supply, irrigation, flood control, and hydropower. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, a large number of reservoirs are significantly affected by reservoir sedimentation (Minear and Kondolf 2009)....

Contacts: Justin Minear
Date published: October 26, 2018
Status: Active

Coordinated Pesticide Reconnaissance Study of Surface Waters in California

Pesticides are used throughout the State of California in both urban and agricultural settings and are routinely detected in surface water. Each year, new pesticides are introduced to the market and often become detected in surface water. It can take several years or more for routine monitoring programs to acquire the capability to detect new and understudied pesticides of concern because...

Contacts: James Orlando
Date published: October 26, 2018
Status: Active

Development of Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) for the Tuolumne River Basin, Central California, with application for streamflow predictability and flood forecasting.

Runoff from snowmelt and rainfall in the Tuolumne River basin plays a significant role in irrigation and domestic water supply for Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Districts, City of Modesto and the San Francisco Bay Area. This area experiences very different seasonal and decadal climate events which are known to affect the timing and volumes of runoff. Land-cover change alone, such as the Rim...

Contacts: Kathryn Koczot
Date published: October 26, 2018
Status: Completed

Atmospheric Deposition Contributions to Mercury Yields in Select Watersheds in the Western United States and Canada

The atmosphere plays an important role in the delivery to and cycling of mercury (Hg) in the environment and it can be a major source of Hg contamination to surface waters. Globally, atmospheric deposition of Hg is the primary source of Hg related concerns for human and ecosystem health (Fitzgerald and others, 1998). In California and other areas in the United States, Hg use in gold and silver...

Date published: October 24, 2018
Status: Active

Monitoring Mercury and Methylmercury in Water, Sediment and Biota in Combie Reservoir Before and After Dredging and Mercury Removal

Dredging to maintain water storage capacity by the Nevada Irrigation District (NID) occurred at Lake Combie reservoir, one of several reservoirs along the Bear River, California over the past 40 years on an as-needed basis to maintain water storage capacity. Maintenance dredging operations were halted by the Central Valley Regional Water...

Date published: October 24, 2018
Status: Active

The Effects of Artificial Recharge on Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater in the Joshua Tree Subbasin, California

The Joshua Basin Water District (JBWD) is implementing an artificial groundwater recharge program to reverse the decline of groundwater levels and to store water in the Joshua Tree groundwater subbasin of the Morongo groundwater basin (~100 mi east of Los Angeles, CA).

Contacts: David O'Leary
Date published: October 24, 2018
Status: Active

Subsidence from Aquifer-Storage and Recovery in the East Bay Plain

The East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) has proposed to store and recover as much as 10 million gallons of water per day (MGD) at an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) site, the Bayside Groundwater Project. Water will be stored in a 100-ft sequence of coarse-grained sediment (the "Deep Aquifer") underlying the East Bay Plain and the adjacent Niles Cone ground-water basin.

Contacts: Michelle Sneed
Date published: October 24, 2018
Status: Active

Pesticides in Suspended Sediment of the Alamo and New Rivers

Previous studies have detected current-use pesticides and DDT metabolites in water and suspended sediments from the Alamo and New Rivers. Additional studies have found water samples from both rivers to be toxic to aquatic organisms in laboratory bioassays, and implicated certain current-use pesticides as the source of this toxicity. Recent requirements under the Clean Water Act for the...

Contacts: James Orlando
Date published: October 22, 2018
Status: Completed

Piezometers and Groundwater Levels

Measurements of elevations, aquifer-system compaction, and water levels are used to improve our understanding of the processes responsible for land-surface elevation changes. Elevation or elevation-change measurements are fundamental to monitoring land subsidence.

Contacts: Michelle Sneed
Date published: October 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Simulating Land Subsidence

The California Water Science Center has been involved in multiple studies simulating land subsidence associated with groundwater withdrawal. The simulations can be used to estimate the magnitude, location, and timing of subsidence. They can also be used to evaluate management strategies to mitigate adverse effects from subsidence while also optimizing water availability.

Contacts: Claudia C Faunt
Date published: October 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Using Numerical Models to Simulate Subsidence

The California Water Science Center has been involved in multiple studies simulating land subsidence associated with groundwater withdrawal. The simulations can be used to estimate the magnitude, location, and timing of subsidence. They can also be used to evaluate management strategies to mitigate adverse effects from subsidence while also optimizing water availability.

Contacts: Claudia C Faunt
Date published: October 18, 2018
Status: Active

Decomposition of Organic Soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California was once a great tidal freshwater marsh. It is blanketed by peat and peaty alluvium deposited where streams originating in the Sierra Nevada, Coast Ranges, and South Cascade Range enter San Francisco Bay. In the late 1800s, levees were built along the stream channels, and the land thus protected from flooding was drained, cleared, and planted ('...