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Quantitative Modeling

A requirement for managing a species, be it a common native species, a species of conservation concern, or an invasive species, is having some information on its distribution and potential drivers of distribution. Branch scientists have been tackling the question of where these types of species are and where they might be in the future. Focus species are as varied as the invasive tamarisk, Russian olive, Africanized honey bee and nutria to the federally threatened Lesser Prairie chicken and others. These and other species are modeled at a variety of spatial scales, from park or wildlife refuge to global levels. Models use various predictor layers that can include current and future climate layers (near- and long-term projections), remote-sensing derivatives (such as MODIS phenology metrics), land cover, topography, and anthropogenic features.

Filter Total Items: 28

Optimization of Management Actions for Restoration Success and Wildlife Populations

USGS researchers, in collaboration with the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative and other partners, are developing a statistically based prioritization tool that will aid agencies in their management decisions.
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Optimization of Management Actions for Restoration Success and Wildlife Populations

USGS researchers, in collaboration with the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative and other partners, are developing a statistically based prioritization tool that will aid agencies in their management decisions.
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Developing a step-by-step process for assessing cumulative effects in the Bureau of Land Management

The National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to assess potential impacts of proposed actions as part of their decision-making processes. Due to the complex nature of cumulative effects analyses, many are currently limited in nature. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to develop a process that staff can use to strengthen cumulative effects analyses.
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Developing a step-by-step process for assessing cumulative effects in the Bureau of Land Management

The National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to assess potential impacts of proposed actions as part of their decision-making processes. Due to the complex nature of cumulative effects analyses, many are currently limited in nature. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to develop a process that staff can use to strengthen cumulative effects analyses.
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Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Pacific

Research on Guam has led to development and validation of numerous effective control tools, including the advancement of reptile control to support native species recovery.
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Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Pacific

Research on Guam has led to development and validation of numerous effective control tools, including the advancement of reptile control to support native species recovery.
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Defining Multi-Scaled Functional Landscape Connectivity for the Sagebrush Biome to Support Management and Conservation Planning of Multiple Species

USGS and Colorado State University scientists are modelling multispecies connectivity through intact and disturbed areas of the sagebrush landscape.
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Defining Multi-Scaled Functional Landscape Connectivity for the Sagebrush Biome to Support Management and Conservation Planning of Multiple Species

USGS and Colorado State University scientists are modelling multispecies connectivity through intact and disturbed areas of the sagebrush landscape.
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Greater Sage-Grouse and Mule Deer Population Viability Analysis Across Scales

USGS and Colorado State University scientists will use data about sage-grouse and mule deer population data across Wyoming to evaluate the effectiveness of disturbance thresholds and investigate the efficacy of other disturbance metrics.
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Greater Sage-Grouse and Mule Deer Population Viability Analysis Across Scales

USGS and Colorado State University scientists will use data about sage-grouse and mule deer population data across Wyoming to evaluate the effectiveness of disturbance thresholds and investigate the efficacy of other disturbance metrics.
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Soil-Climate Modeling To Improve Understanding of Pattern and Processes in Sagebrush Ecosystems: A Spatially Explicit Soil Classification

Resistance and resilience concepts provide an important framework for sagebrush habitat management. Existing spatial products have been developed using NRCS soil data; models using new data and methods can improve these products.
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Soil-Climate Modeling To Improve Understanding of Pattern and Processes in Sagebrush Ecosystems: A Spatially Explicit Soil Classification

Resistance and resilience concepts provide an important framework for sagebrush habitat management. Existing spatial products have been developed using NRCS soil data; models using new data and methods can improve these products.
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Using Long-Term Remote Sensing and an Automated Reference Toolset To Estimate and Predict Post-Development Recovery Potential

USGS scientists are using a time-varying approach to monitor and predict recovery of sagebrush ecosystems following disturbance.
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Using Long-Term Remote Sensing and an Automated Reference Toolset To Estimate and Predict Post-Development Recovery Potential

USGS scientists are using a time-varying approach to monitor and predict recovery of sagebrush ecosystems following disturbance.
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Evaluating Trends in Greater Sage-Grouse Populations With Quantile Regression

USGS scientists are evaluating the use of quantile regression to develop models of sage-grouse population changes across the United States.
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Evaluating Trends in Greater Sage-Grouse Populations With Quantile Regression

USGS scientists are evaluating the use of quantile regression to develop models of sage-grouse population changes across the United States.
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Developing Broad Scale Indicators for Monitoring Ecosystems and Landscapes

Many issues currently facing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and other large land managers span large landscapes, including sage-grouse conservation, wildfires, and energy development. Such challenges involve changes at both local and broad scales, but monitoring has typically focused at the scale of individual sites. The USGS is working to develop broad-scale indicators for monitoring...
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Developing Broad Scale Indicators for Monitoring Ecosystems and Landscapes

Many issues currently facing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and other large land managers span large landscapes, including sage-grouse conservation, wildfires, and energy development. Such challenges involve changes at both local and broad scales, but monitoring has typically focused at the scale of individual sites. The USGS is working to develop broad-scale indicators for monitoring...
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Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Everglades

Invasive species are considered to be second only to habitat degradation in terms of negative impacts on the Earth’s ecosystems, and our scientists make up a significant proportion of the global expertise in the rapidly-growing problem of invasive reptiles.
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Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Everglades

Invasive species are considered to be second only to habitat degradation in terms of negative impacts on the Earth’s ecosystems, and our scientists make up a significant proportion of the global expertise in the rapidly-growing problem of invasive reptiles.
Learn More

Species Distribution Modeling

A requirement for managing a species, be it a common native species, a species of conservation concern, or an invasive species, is having some information on its distribution and potential drivers of distribution. Branch scientists have been tackling the question of where these types of species are and where they might be in the future.
link

Species Distribution Modeling

A requirement for managing a species, be it a common native species, a species of conservation concern, or an invasive species, is having some information on its distribution and potential drivers of distribution. Branch scientists have been tackling the question of where these types of species are and where they might be in the future.
Learn More

Documenting, Mapping, and Predicting Invasive Species Using the Fort Collins Science Center's RAM (Resource for Advanced Modeling)

The Resource for Advanced Modeling room provides a collaborative working environment for up to 20 scientists, supported with networked, wireless computing capability for running and testing various scientific models (e.g., Maxent, Boosted Regression Trees, Logistic Regression, MARS, Random Forest) at a variety of spatial scales, from county to global levels. Models use various predictor layers...
link

Documenting, Mapping, and Predicting Invasive Species Using the Fort Collins Science Center's RAM (Resource for Advanced Modeling)

The Resource for Advanced Modeling room provides a collaborative working environment for up to 20 scientists, supported with networked, wireless computing capability for running and testing various scientific models (e.g., Maxent, Boosted Regression Trees, Logistic Regression, MARS, Random Forest) at a variety of spatial scales, from county to global levels. Models use various predictor layers...
Learn More