Fort Collins Science Center

Quantitative Modeling

A requirement for managing a species, be it a common native species, a species of conservation concern, or an invasive species, is having some information on its distribution and potential drivers of distribution. Branch scientists have been tackling the question of where these types of species are and where they might be in the future. Focus species are as varied as the invasive tamarisk, Russian olive, Africanized honey bee and nutria to the federally threatened Lesser Prairie chicken and others. These and other species are modeled at a variety of spatial scales, from park or wildlife refuge to global levels. Models use various predictor layers that can include current and future climate layers (near- and long-term projections), remote-sensing derivatives (such as MODIS phenology metrics), land cover, topography, and anthropogenic features.

Filter Total Items: 19
Date published: December 14, 2020
Status: Active

Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Pacific

Research on Guam has led to development and validation of numerous effective control tools, including the advancement of reptile control to support native species recovery. 

Date published: December 7, 2016
Status: Active

Developing Broad Scale Indicators for Monitoring Ecosystems and Landscapes

Many issues currently facing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and other large land managers span large landscapes, including sage-grouse conservation, wildfires, and energy development. Such challenges involve changes at both local and broad scales, but monitoring has typically focused at the scale of individual sites. The USGS is working to develop broad-scale indicators for monitoring...

Date published: December 4, 2016
Status: Active

Biology, Impacts and Control of Invasive Reptiles in the Everglades

Invasive species are considered to be second only to habitat degradation in terms of negative impacts on the Earth’s ecosystems, and our scientists make up a significant proportion of the global expertise in the rapidly-growing problem of invasive reptiles.

Date published: December 3, 2016
Status: Active

Species Distribution Modeling

A requirement for managing a species, be it a common native species, a species of conservation concern, or an invasive species, is having some information on its distribution and potential drivers of distribution. Branch scientists have been tackling the question of where these types of species are and where they might be in the future.

Date published: November 17, 2016
Status: Archived

Resource for Advanced Modeling (RAM) and VisTrails/SAHM Training

For classes in the SAHM/Vis-trails software, please contact Catherine Jarnevich. The Resource for Advanced Modeling room is located within the USGS Fort Collins Science Center in Fort Collins, CO. 

Date published: November 10, 2016
Status: Active

Documenting, Mapping, and Predicting Invasive Species Using the Fort Collins Science Center's RAM (Resource for Advanced Modeling)

The Resource for Advanced Modeling room provides a collaborative working environment for up to 20 scientists, supported with networked, wireless computing capability for running and testing various scientific models (e.g., Maxent, Boosted Regression Trees, Logistic Regression, MARS, Random Forest) at a variety of spatial scales, from county to global levels. Models use various predictor layers...

Date published: October 27, 2016
Status: Active

Non-invasive Genetic Sampling of Free-roaming Horses to Estimate Population Size, Genetic Diversity, and Consumption of Invasive Species

Molecular tagging is a new application of molecular genetic techniques to traditional mark-recapture methodology designed to address situations where traditional methods fail. In such studies, non-invasively collected samples (such as feces, feathers, or fur) are used as a source of DNA that is then genotyped at multiple loci such that each individual animal can be uniquely identified. Thus,...

Date published: October 18, 2016
Status: Active

Counting America’s Wild Horses and Burros: Better Estimates for Population Management

The Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, as amended, states that, "It is the policy of Congress that wild free-roaming horses and burros shall be protected from capture, branding, harassment, or death; and to accomplish this they are to be considered in the area where presently found, as an integral part of the natural system of the public lands (PL 92-195, Sec. 1331, Congressional...

Date published: August 31, 2016
Status: Active

Incorporating Genetic Data into Spatially-explicit Population Viability Models for Gunnison Sage-grouse

This goal of this study is to develop a spatially explicit habitat-population modeling framework to assess the viability of Gunnison Sage-grouse and each of the seven populations (Gunnison Basin and six satellite populations).

Date published: August 26, 2016
Status: Active

Tools for Managing and Monitoring Sage Grouse

To better understand how land-use changes are affecting greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), FORT is collaborating with USGS centers FRESC, GECSC, WERC, and EROS; the BLM; Colorado State University; and the WLCI to develop information and tools for managing and monitoring grouse.

Date published: August 8, 2016
Status: Active

Landscape Genetics

Landscape genetics is a recently developed discipline that involves the merger of molecular population genetics and landscape ecology.  The goal of this new field of study is to provide information about the interaction between landscape features and microevolutionary processes such as gene flow, genetic drift, and selection allowing for the understanding of processes that generate genetic...

Date published: August 2, 2016
Status: Active

Population Models

Population models can incorporate genetic data to assess potential impacts of different management strategies on connectivity, effective population size, and genetic diversity.