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Land Change Science Program

The Land Change Science (LCS) Program strives to advance the understanding of the rates, causes, and consequences of climate and land use change, and the vulnerability and resilience of the Earth system to such changes.

News

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ECOLOGICAL DROUGHT FORECAST TOOL FOR DRYLANDS

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A Legacy Continues with Landsat 9 Launch

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USGS Landsat Satellites Enable Google to Portray Global Change

Publications

Anthropogenic landcover impacts fluvial dissolved organic matter composition in the Upper Mississippi River Basin

Landcover changes have altered the natural carbon cycle; however, most landcover studies focus on either forest conversion to agriculture or urban, rarely both. We present differences in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and dissolved organic matter (DOM) molecular composition within Upper Mississippi River Basin low order streams and rivers draining one of three dominant landcovers (f

A global ecological classification of coastal segment units to complement marine biodiversity observation network assessments

A new data layer provides Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) labels for global coastal segments at 1 km or shorter resolution. These characteristics are summarized for six US Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) sites and one MBON Pole to Pole of the Americas site in Argentina. The global coastlines CMECS classifications were produced from a partitioning of a 3

Evidence for humans in North America during the Last Glacial Maximum

Archaeologists and researchers in allied fields have long sought to understand human colonization of North America. When, how, and from where did people migrate, and what were the consequences of their arrival for the established fauna and landscape are enduring questions. Here, we present evidence from excavated surfaces of in situ human footprints from White Sands National Park (New Mexico, USA)

Science

Developing a step-by-step process for assessing cumulative effects in the Bureau of Land Management

The National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to assess potential impacts of proposed actions as part of their decision-making processes. Due to the complex nature of cumulative effects analyses, many are currently limited in nature. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to develop a process that staff can use to strengthen cumulative effects analyses.
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Developing a step-by-step process for assessing cumulative effects in the Bureau of Land Management

The National Environmental Policy Act requires federal agencies to assess potential impacts of proposed actions as part of their decision-making processes. Due to the complex nature of cumulative effects analyses, many are currently limited in nature. We are working with the Bureau of Land Management to develop a process that staff can use to strengthen cumulative effects analyses.
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New Insights on using Green Stormwater Infrastructure to Reduce Suburban Runoff

The Issue with RunoffAcross the United States, suburban development is replacing agricultural and forested lands. In urban and suburban areas, large amounts of stormwater runoff are generated from rooftops and roadways during rain events. Runoff is quickly piped to streams and rivers, leading to flash flooding, stream bank erosion, and damages to stream health. Reducing nutrients, sediment, and...
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New Insights on using Green Stormwater Infrastructure to Reduce Suburban Runoff

The Issue with RunoffAcross the United States, suburban development is replacing agricultural and forested lands. In urban and suburban areas, large amounts of stormwater runoff are generated from rooftops and roadways during rain events. Runoff is quickly piped to streams and rivers, leading to flash flooding, stream bank erosion, and damages to stream health. Reducing nutrients, sediment, and...
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Remote Sensing of Ecosystem Condition and Resilience

Ecosystem condition tends to be highly dynamic in response to natural variability in climate, extreme climate events, disturbance events, and human land use activities. Satellite imagery provides a powerful tool to enhance our understanding of ecosystem change at a landscape scale. This research integrates diverse sources of satellite imagery with ancillary datasets to explore how ecosystems...
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Remote Sensing of Ecosystem Condition and Resilience

Ecosystem condition tends to be highly dynamic in response to natural variability in climate, extreme climate events, disturbance events, and human land use activities. Satellite imagery provides a powerful tool to enhance our understanding of ecosystem change at a landscape scale. This research integrates diverse sources of satellite imagery with ancillary datasets to explore how ecosystems...
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