National Wildlife Health Center

News

What's all the buzz about? Stay up-to-date with the latest NWHC and USGS News items below.

Filter Total Items: 127
Date published: July 11, 2016

EarthWord–Morbidity

When you’re not dead yet, but aren’t feeling well either, there’s an EarthWord for that...

Date published: June 27, 2016

EarthWord–Mortality Event

See a flock of birds fall from the sky? There’s an #EarthWord for that, and it isn’t “apocalypse”

Date published: June 1, 2016

Honolulu Field Station Newsletter 7: June 2016

Updates from the NWHC Honolulu Field Station in June 2016. 

Date published: March 31, 2016

Bat with white-nose syndrome confirmed in Washington state

OLYMPIA, Wash. – White-nose syndrome (WNS) has been confirmed in a little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) found near North Bend – the first recorded occurrence of this devastating bat disease in western North America. The presence of this disease was verified by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center

Date published: March 1, 2016

Snake Fungal Disease Found in Louisiana

Snake fungal disease, or SFD, a disease causing high mortality rates in some species of snakes, has been found in Louisiana for the first time, according to a new study by U.S. Geological Survey scientists. SFD now has been confirmed in at least 16 states in the Eastern and Midwestern United States.

Date published: February 22, 2016

Deadly Amphibian Fungus Abroad Threatens Certain U.S. Regions

The areas of the United States that are most at risk of a potentially invasive salamander fungus are the Pacific coast, the southern Appalachian Mountains and the mid-Atlantic regions, according to a recently published U.S. Geological Survey report.

Date published: January 20, 2016

Invasive Amphibian Fungus Could Threaten US Salamander Populations

A deadly fungus causing population crashes in wild European salamanders could emerge in the United States and threaten already declining amphibians here, according to a report released today by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: December 11, 2015

Wildlife Disease Science in the National Parks

From striking craggy pinnacles to cavernous underground lairs, the national parks are renowned for their grand wildernesses. However, the inhabitants of these landscapes – the wilds’ wildlife – are perhaps the most beloved of the parks’ draws.