National Wildlife Health Center

News

What's all the buzz about? Stay up-to-date with the latest NWHC and USGS News items below.

Filter Total Items: 121
Date published: March 31, 2015

New Technology Helps Identify Dispersal of Avian Flu Virus between Asia and Alaska

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In a new study published today, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service harnessed a new type of DNA technology to investigate avian influenza viruses in Alaska.

Date published: March 9, 2015

International Bat Monitoring Research Group Receives

USGS bat conservation researchers and their partners are being recognized today with the U.S. Forest Service Wings Across the Americas Research Award for their contributions to the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat).

Date published: January 23, 2015

USGS Statement Regarding Avian Flu Found in Washington State Green-Winged Teal

Some media are reporting that the Asian H5N1 strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza has now entered the United States. This is incorrect.

Date published: January 5, 2015

How Does White-Nose Syndrome Kill Bats?

For the first time, scientists have developed a detailed explanation of how white-nose syndrome (WNS) is killing millions of bats in North America, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Wisconsin. The scientists created a model for how the disease progresses from initial infection to death in bats during hibernation.

Date published: December 17, 2014

Highly Pathogenic H5 Avian Influenza Confirmed in Wild Birds in Washington State H5N2 Found in Northern Pintail Ducks & H5N8 Found in Captive Gyrfalcons

WASHINGTON, Dec. 17, 2014 — The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic (HPAI) H5 avian influenza in wild birds in Whatcom County, Washington.

Date published: December 16, 2014

Honolulu Field Station Newsletter 5: December 2014

Updates from the NWHC Honolulu Field Station in December 2014.

Date published: September 3, 2014

Avian Flu in Seals Could Infect People

The avian flu virus that caused widespread harbor seal deaths in 2011 can easily spread to and infect other mammals and potentially humans.

Date published: June 6, 2014

Honolulu Field Station Newsletter 4: June 2014

Updates from the NWHC Honolulu Field Station in June 2014.

Date published: May 29, 2014

Ultra-violet Light Works as Screening Tool for Bats with White-nose Syndrome.

Scientists working to understand the devastating bat disease known as white-nose syndrome (WNS) now have a new, non-lethal tool to identify bats with WNS lesions —ultraviolet, or UV, light.

Date published: April 8, 2014

Sea Otters Can Get the Flu, Too

Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. 

Date published: March 19, 2014

North Atlantic May Be a New Route for Spread of Avian Flu to North America

The North Atlantic region is a newly discovered important pathway for avian influenza to move between Europe and North America, according to a U.S. Geological Survey report published today.

Date published: March 12, 2014

Parasite in Live Asian Swamp Eels May Cause Human Illness

Raw or undercooked Asian swamp eels could transmit a parasitic infection called gnathostomiasis to consumers.