Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Earthquakes and Faults

Filter Total Items: 18
Date published: March 4, 2019
Status: Active

Preliminary simulations of the 2010 Chilean tsunami

Preliminary simulations of the 2010 Chilean tsunami from the 27 February 2010 M=8.8 subduction zone earthquake, offshore Bio-Bio, Chile

Contacts: Eric Geist
Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

California Seafloor Mapping Program map-set production

USGS and the California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) are supporting development of peer-reviewed map sets for California’s mainland State Waters.

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

California State Waters Map Series: Map sheets and accompanying pamphlet

The map sheets display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The total number of sheets varies by area but always includes a core of the same 10 sheets and may include specialty sheets depending on the region. The available sheet sets are listed by study...

Date published: October 27, 2018
Status: Active

Global Geoengineering Research

The Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center geotechnical group investigates the causes of ground deformation and ground failure as a result of earthquakes, storms, and wave action

Contacts: Robert Kayen
Date published: September 20, 2018
Status: Completed

Could It Happen Here?

The Question: Soon after the devastating tsunamis in the Indian Ocean on December 26, 2004 and in Japan on March 11, 2011, many people have asked, "Could such a tsunami happen in the United States?" This web page summarizes what we know about tsunamis that have struck the U.S. in the past, providing a foundation for estimating tsunami likelihood in the future. Below, we outline the sources of...

Contacts: Eric Geist
Date published: January 1, 2004
Status: Completed

Tsunami Hazards in the Santa Barbara Channel

Information about the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center's study of tsunami hazards in the Santa Barbara Channel from 1993-2003.

Contacts: Ray Sliter