St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

News

Filter Total Items: 191
Date published: November 30, 2017

Researchers Present Protocols for Evaluating Barrier Island Restoration Effectiveness

Protocols created as part of the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program and will be used to evaluate project success and determine if adaptive management action may be needed to achieve habitat restoration and mainland storm protection.

Date published: November 30, 2017

USGS Research Geologist Gives "Geologic Control on the Evolution of Nearshore Environments" Presentation at NOAA Office

USGS geologist Jim Flocks presented recent research into the influence of the geologic framework on the evolution of nearshore shore-oblique sand ridges in the northern Gulf of Mexico at the NOAA Southeast Regional Office speaker series. 

Date published: November 27, 2017

USGS researcher announced as judge for Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE competition

Christina Kellogg will be a judge for Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE competition.

Date published: November 8, 2017

Eyes on the Coast—Video Cameras Help Forecast Coastal Change

Coastal communities count on beaches for recreation and for protection from large waves, but beaches are vulnerable to threats such as erosion by storms and flooding. Whether beaches grow, shrink, or even disappear depends in part on what happens just offshore. How do features like shifting sandbars affect waves, currents, and the movement of sand from the beach to offshore and back?

Date published: November 1, 2017

USGS Researcher awarded 2018 Rudi Lemberg Travelling Fellowship by Australian Academy of Science

Research microbiologist Christina Kellogg (USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center) was recognized as a prominent international scientist by the Australian Academy of Science and awarded the 2018 Rudi Lemberg Travelling Fellowship.

Date published: November 1, 2017

Sound Waves Newsletter - August-October 2017

Video cameras help forecast coastal change, USGS Monitors Huge Landslides on California's Big Sur Coast, Coastal change caused by Hurricane Irma, and more in this August-October 2017 issue of Sound Waves.

Date published: November 1, 2017

USGS Oceanographer Invited as Keynote Speaker for International Conference

Research Oceanographer Joseph Long of the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center will travel to Delft, Netherlands, to be a keynote speaker at the upcoming XBeachX conference, which takes place November 1–3.

Date published: November 1, 2017

Before and After: Coastal Change Caused by Hurricane Irma

New high-angle oblique photos of portions of Florida’s beaches taken before and after Hurricane Irma made landfall and swept up the state show the impact of the hurricane’s storm surge and waves. These NOAA images document changes to the coast after the storm, helping the USGS fine-tune its coastal-change forecasting model.

Date published: November 1, 2017

Recent Fieldwork - August-October 2017

USGS scientists visited more than 40 coastal and offshore locations in recent months, studying hurricane damage, coastal landslides, methane seeps, and much more.

Date published: November 1, 2017

Eyes on the Coast—Video Cameras Help Forecast Coastal Change

Coastal communities count on beaches for recreation and for protection from large waves, but beaches are vulnerable to threats such as erosion by storms and flooding. Whether beaches grow, shrink, or even disappear depends in part on what happens just offshore. How do features like shifting sandbars affect waves, currents, and the movement of sand from the beach to offshore and back?

Date published: November 1, 2017

Recent Publications - August-October 2017

List of USGS publications on coastal and marine research, published between August and October of 2017

Date published: October 10, 2017

USGS Tracks Evolution of a Fire Island Hurricane-Made Breach

A study finds that although the “wilderness breach” created by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 has reached a relatively stable size and location, the channel and shoals will keep changing in response to weather. Related research shows the breach isn’t likely to increase storm-tide flooding in Great South Bay.