Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

Invasive Carp

Filter Total Items: 27
Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluation of a broadband sound as a deterrent for bigheaded carps at the Emiquon Preserve (Lewistown, Illinois)

Expansion of bigheaded carps Hypophthalmichthys spp. throughout North American waterways have prompted the need for control systems that can alter their movement and/or behavior. The avoidance response of bigheaded carps to the sound of an outboard motor (0.06-10 kHz) has lead researchers to investigate sound as a means to manipulate their movements. 

Contacts: James Wamboldt
Date published: January 11, 2018
Status: Active

Development of Chemical Tools to Control Invasive Carp and Dreissenid Mussels

Over 180 and 140 aquatic invasive species (AIS) have been introduced into the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River basins, respectively, with threats of new invasions always on the horizon. Sea lamprey, zebra mussels, and invasive carps are just a few examples of AIS whose abilities to alter aquatic habitats and disrupt food cycles threaten many outdoor recreation opportunities and...

Contacts: Mark Gaikowski
Date published: December 14, 2017
Status: Active

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)

The President's 2010 Budget provided $475 million for a new interagency Great Lakes restoration initiative, which targets the most significant problems in the region, including invasive aquatic species (like zebra and quagga mussels), non-point source pollution, and contaminated sediment.

This initiative uses outcome-oriented performance...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Increasing Efficiency and Throughput of eDNA

The results from this study will provide protocols for the collection, processing and analysis of environmental deoxyribonucleic acids (eDNA) samples for monitoring aquatic invasive species like Asian carp. These protocols have the potential to be used by fishery management agencies to monitor aquatic invasive species throughout the United States.

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

The Lethality of Hot Water and Ozone on Aquatic Invasive Species

With the increasing prevalence of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) in the Chicago Area Waterways System (CAWS), the implementation of new control techniques to inhibit the dispersal of AIS is strongly desired. For a technique to be a truly viable option, the process would inhibit the movement of AIS between the Mississippi River Basin and the Great Lakes. A physical barrier separating these...

Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Use of antimycin-microparticles and corn feed to control Common Carp Cyprinus carpio

Attempts to control carp, Cyprinus carpio, populations in Minnesota (and elsewhere) date back to early 1900s (Moyle et al. 1950, Moyle and Kuehn 1964). Early efforts focused on removing large numbers of adult carp, often by targeting their winter aggregations using seine nets. Such was the strategy in Minnesota in 1930s and 40s, where carp were systematically removed with nets in dozens of...

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Evaluating the behavioral response of silver and bighead carp to CO2 across three temperatures

Carbon dioxide (CO2) has shown promise as a deterrent to silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp (H. nobilis) movement during laboratory (Kates et al. 2012, Dennis et al. 2015) and pond testing (Donaldson et al. 2016, Cupp et al. in journal review). To further understand the utility of CO2 to limit the dispersal of bigheaded carps, continued research into this technology is...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Determination of the Acute Toxicity of Model-based Candidate Chemical Toxicants to Native and Nonnative Fish Species in Static Exposures

Invasive fishes are of considerable concern to aquatic resource managers.   For example, the common carp (Cyprinus carpio), originally brought over from Eurasia sometime in the 1800s are now ubiquitous in U.S. waters.  Although they have been around for over 100 years and have become part of U.S. culture, they are still highly detrimental to aquatic ecosystems and a method to eradicate and...

Contacts: Joel G Putnam
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Carbon dioxide (CO2) injected under-ice to enhance winterkill of invasive carps

Invasive carps, primarily silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitirx), bighead carp (H. nobilis), and grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), have caused considerable ecological and economic damage in the United States. Resource managers need tools to control populations and limit range expansion of these undesired fish. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one approach...

Contacts: Aaron Cupp
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Developing a portable LAMP assay for detecting grass and black carp

Aquatic invasive species are a significant problem throughout the world. They cause millions of dollars in damages to industry, devastate natural ecosystems, and ruin outdoor recreational areas. Preventing their spread is imperative to preserving our natural resources. One potential pathway invasive fishes can spread is by harvesting and transporting baitfish. Often shipments of baitfish are...

Contacts: Chris M Merkes
Date published: May 9, 2017
Status: Active

Correlating seasonal trends and occupancy of bigheaded carp eDNA to land use and stream characteristics

The results of this study will advance our understanding of environmental DNA (eDNA) and how eDNA signatures change as fish behavior changes over the course of the open water season.  This will further develop eDNA as an easy sampling method to collect information about invading populations or cryptic species that are difficult to capture so that resource managers can be given better...

Date published: May 8, 2017
Status: Active

Bioacoustic manipulation of invasive Bigheaded carp

Bigheaded carp, especially silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), are invasive fish species that have established breeding populations dominating large regions of the Mississippi Drainage in the 20 years following escape from aquaculture facilities in Arkansas