Upper Midwest Environmental Science Center

Aquatic Ecosystem Health

The role of the Aquatic Ecosystem Health program is to conduct research to protect, mitigate, and enhance the health of aquatic ecosystems.  Research conducted within the Program is focused on the following 3 areas of study, (1) controlling aquatic invasive species, (2) fisheries restoration, and (3) understanding the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems.

Filter Total Items: 47
Date published: July 23, 2018
Status: Active

BOR environmental DNA sampling for invasive mussels at USGS gages

As part of an ongoing project funded by the Bureau of Reclamation and lead by the Idaho Water Sciences Center (IDWSC) and Northern Rocky Mountain Research Center (NOROCK), the Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) will analyze environmental DNA samples collected at gage stations directly downstream of multiple reservoirs throughout the Columbia River Basin. The goal of this...

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: July 23, 2018
Status: Active

Avoidance behavior of cold-, cool-, and warmwater fish exposed to Zequanox in a two-choice preference chamber

Zebra (Dreissenia polymorpha, Pallas 1771) and quagga (D. bugensis, Andrusov 1897) mussels, collectively referred to as dreissenid mussels, are invasive bivalves native to the Ponto-Caspian region of Eurasia (Stepien et al. 2013; Benson 2018a). High fecundity and a free-swimming planktonic life stage allow for easy and rapid dispersal of dreissenid mussels (Mackie 1991;...

Contacts: James Luoma
Date published: July 23, 2018
Status: Active

Assessment of newly developed acoustic stimuli for manipulating movement of bigheaded carps

Bigheaded carps, like other cyprinids, have specialized structures known as Weberian ossicles that increase their hearing range and sensitivity. Recent results from controlled laboratory studies have indicated that playback of a recording of an outboard boat motor was effective at altering silver and bighead carp behavior. 

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Forensic Markers of Lampricide Toxicity & Mortality in Non-Target Fishes

The pesticides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol  (TFM) and niclosamide selectively target larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) because they have a much lower capacity to detoxify these lampricides by forming glucuronide conjugates compared to typical non-target fishes.  However, if lampricide uptake overwhelms a fish's detoxification capacity, non-target mortality can result.  Non-target...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluation of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) as a non-physical deterrent to invasive Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and Rusty Crayfish (Faxonius rusticus)

Red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and Rusty crayfish (Faxonius rusticus) are invasive crayfish species in nearly all Great Lakes states (https://nas.er.usgs.gov/viewer/omap.aspx?SpeciesID=217). Both species are a concern in Michigan because they can displace native crayfish populations, their feeding...

Contacts: Kim Fredricks
Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Avoidance behavior of larval sea lampreys in response to Bayluscide® as an evaluation of the utility of a Bayluscide® bar formulation in sea lamprey control operations

This study will be conducted to provide information on the avoidance behavior of larval sea lampreys in response to the lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2’,5-dichloro-4’-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide).  The data generated will be used to evaluate the feasibility of developing a new lampricide formulation (Bayluscide® Solid Bar) for use in the Great Lakes...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluation of the toxicity of niclosamide to two fresh water mussel species and larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) when exposed to granular Bayluscide

Niclosamide (5-chloro-N-[2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl]-2-hydroxybenzamide; NIC) is the active ingredient in the 3.2% granular formulation of Bayluscide® (gB). is applied to assess populations of Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larva that are too deep to electro fish or remove larva in habitats and too large to treat with liquid formulations of lampricides in a cost effective manner.  Concerns...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Five Year Stability Study of Lampricides

Lampricides are usually ordered and produced in large quantities every two or three years depending on projected need.  The majority of the lampricides are used within three years.  The chemical stability of lampricides stored under normal standard operating procedures is not known beyond three years.  Product that has been stored for more than 3 years has to be tested for percent active...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Field Evaluation of Microparticles

With this study, we will validate the use of microparticles to selectively deliver a control agent to feral bigheaded carps. Prior controlled studies conducted in ponds at the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) in Columbia, Missouri indicated that microparticles could be used to deliver antimycin to bigheaded carps while not impacting non-target species like Largemouth Bass and...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Assessment of Open Water Zequanox Applications for Controlling Dreissenid Mussels within an Inland Lake

Invasion of dreissenid mussels (zebra and quagga mussels, Dreissena polymorpha and D. rostriformis bugensis, respectively) into the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Basins has resulted in estimated economic impacts as high as $1 billion annually for maintenance and repair of biofouled water conveyance systems and other infrastructures (Pimentel et al. 2005). 

Contacts: James Luoma
Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Screening toxic compounds using cellular assays

This study is designed to be a high-throughput alternative to traditional methods of using whole fish assays to screen compounds for toxicity. This approach involves an initial pre-screening of a chemical databank to select molecules possessing characteristics identified as predictive criteria for potential toxicity to the fathead minnow, followed by cytotoxicity screening of selected...

Date published: February 27, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluation of a broadband sound as a deterrent for bigheaded carps at the Emiquon Preserve (Lewistown, Illinois)

Expansion of bigheaded carps Hypophthalmichthys spp. throughout North American waterways have prompted the need for control systems that can alter their movement and/or behavior. The avoidance response of bigheaded carps to the sound of an outboard motor (0.06-10 kHz) has lead researchers to investigate sound as a means to manipulate their movements. 

Contacts: James Wamboldt