Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

Aquatic Ecosystem Health

The role of the Aquatic Ecosystem Health program is to conduct research to protect, mitigate, and enhance the health of aquatic ecosystems.  Research conducted within the Program is focused on the following 3 areas of study, (1) controlling aquatic invasive species, (2) fisheries restoration, and (3) understanding the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems.

Filter Total Items: 55
Date published: January 9, 2018
Status: Completed

Determining exposure parameters that maximize eugenol residues in the fillet tissue and determining the sample times that will adequately characterize the depletion of eugenol residues from the fillet tissue of rainbow trout exposed to AQUI-S® 20E

The results from this study will provide the base for future human food safety studies that are required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to approve an immediate release fish sedative.  These data will support the potential approval of an immediate release fish sedative that can be efficiently used by fishery managers throughout the U.S.

Contacts: Jeff Meinertz
Date published: January 9, 2018
Status: Completed

Depletion of emamectin benzoate residues from the fillet tissue of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) treated with SLICE®-medicated feed in recirculating and flow-through aquaculture systems

The results from this study may lead to an expansion of the SLICE® label allowing for treatment of freshwater-reared fish infested with copepods.  Label expansion would enhance production on hatcheries throughout the United Sates.

Date published: May 23, 2017
Status: Active

Field Effectiveness of 35% PEROX-AID® (Hydrogen Peroxide) to Reduce Gyrodactylus sp. Infestation Density in Coolwater and Warmwater Finfish

Impact of UMESC Science

The results from this study may lead to an expansion of the 35% PEROX-AID® label allowing for the use of the drug to control coolwater and warmwater finfish mortality associated with a parasitic infestation.  Label expansion would enhance coldwater finfish production on all hatcheries throughout the United Sates.

Date published: May 23, 2017
Status: Active

Determine the effect of PARASITE-S® (formalin), administered to control mortality from saprolegniasis, on the nitrogen oxidation efficiency of the biofilters of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) for freshwater finfish

Impact of UMESC Science

Data from this study is intended to support label expansion for PARASITE-S® allowing for the use of the drug to control mortality due to saprolegniasis infestations in all fish rearing systems, including recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). 

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Increasing Efficiency and Throughput of eDNA

The results from this study will provide protocols for the collection, processing and analysis of environmental deoxyribonucleic acids (eDNA) samples for monitoring aquatic invasive species like Asian carp. These protocols have the potential to be used by fishery management agencies to monitor aquatic invasive species throughout the United States.

Contacts: Jon Amberg
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Register New Lampricide Active Ingredients and End-use Formulations and Maintain Registered Products in Compliance with United States and Canadian Pesticide Regulations

The USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) provides regulatory affairs assistance to the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), state and private partners in matters regarding numerous registrations of the lampricides TFM and niclosamide in the U.S. and Canada.  The result of this technical...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Improving the Accuracy and Precision of Predictions of TFM-niclosamide Concentrations for Treatment of Sea Lamprey Spawning Tributaries

The results of this research may lead to a more efficient use of the lampricides used to control lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. If lamprey populations are left uncontrolled, the effects on commercial and sport fisheries in the Great Lakes would be devastating.

The treatment of sea lamprey spawning tributaries with mixtures of the piscicides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Develop Experimental Use Permits, Datasets and Develop Registration Plans for Sea Lamprey Pheromones in Compliance with United States and Canadian Biopesticide Regulations

The result of this technical assistance is critical to developing a lamprey pheromone as a tool to control lamprey populations in the Great Lakes. If lamprey populations are left uncontrolled, the effects lamprey would have on the fishery industry in the Great Lakes would be devastating.

Contacts: Kim Fredricks
Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Residue Levels of the Lampricides TFM and Niclosamide in Moribund Sea Lamprey Larvae Following Exposures to TFM and a TFM/1% Niclosamide Combination

Concerns regarding the exposure of wildlife to TFM and niclosamide that would result from the consumption of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvae exposed to these chemicals has prompted a need to investigate uptake of these chemicals in larval lampreys. A study to address concerns regarding the exposure of the endangered common term during the treatment of the St. Marys River was completed...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) density estimates using environmental DNA surveillance

Sea lampreys are a species that invaded the Great Lakes presumably following the improvements made to the Welland Canal in 1920. First reported in Lake Erie in 1921, sea lampreys subsequently spread rapidly to the upper Great Lakes and had an established spawning population in all of the upper Great Lakes by 1947 (Applegate 1950). Following their introduction, sea lamprey devastated the...

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Forensic Markers of Lampricide Toxicity & Mortality in Non-Target Fishes

The pesticides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol  (TFM) and niclosamide selectively target larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) because they have a much lower capacity to detoxify these lampricides by forming glucuronide conjugates compared to typical non-target fishes. Glucuronidation makes lampricides more water soluble and easier to excrete (Lech and Statham 1975; Kane et al. 1994)....

Date published: May 10, 2017
Status: Active

Evaluation of lampricide residues in mayflies during and after a TFM:1% niclosamide treatment as a risk assessment to the federally endangered pipng plover (Charadrius melodus)

The lampricides 3-Trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2’,5-dichloro-4’-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) have been used successfully more than 30 years to kill sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvae in streams and rivers tributary to the Great Lakes. TFM is sold under the commercial name Lamprecid®, a formulation of the sodium salt of TFM which is approximately 35% active ingredient by...