Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Publications

Below is a list of WERC's peer-reviewed publications. If you are searching for a specific publication and cannot find it in this list, please contact werc_web@usgs.gov

Filter Total Items: 3284

Distribution and abundance of Least Bell’s Vireos (<i>Vireo bellii pusillus</i>) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (<i>Empidonax traillii extimus</i>) at the Mojave River Dam, San Bernardino County, California—2021 Data summary

Executive SummaryWe surveyed for Least Bell’s Vireos (Vireo bellii pusillus; vireo) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus; flycatcher) at the Mojave River Dam study area near Hesperia, California, in 2021. Four vireo surveys were conducted between April 16 and July 16, 2021, and three flycatcher surveys were conducted between May 27 and July 16, 2021.We detected four terr

Distribution and abundance of Least Bell’s Vireos (<i>Vireo bellii pusillus</i>) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (<i>Empidonax traillii extimus</i>) at the San Antonio Dam, Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties, California—2021 Data summary

Executive SummaryWe surveyed for Least Bell’s Vireos (Vireo bellii pusillus; vireo) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus; flycatcher) at the San Antonio Dam near Upland, California, in 2021. Four vireo surveys were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2021, and three flycatcher surveys were conducted between May 27 and July 15, 2021.We detected one transient vireo and

Distribution and abundance of Least Bell’s Vireos (<i>Vireo bellii pusillus</i>) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (<i>Empidonax traillii extimus</i>) on the Middle San Luis Rey River, San Diego County, southern California—2021 Data summary

Executive SummaryWe surveyed for Least Bell’s Vireos (Vireo bellii pusillus; vireo) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus; flycatcher) along the San Luis Rey River, between College Boulevard in Oceanside and Interstate 15 in Fallbrook, California (middle San Luis Rey River), in 2021. Surveys were conducted from April 13 to July 14 (vireo) and from May 18 to July 13 (flyca

Small shorebirds feast on green slime to fuel their long migration

Shorebirds wade in shallow waters along shorelines searching for food. More than a million shorebirds visit the San Francisco Estuary each year during their migration to feast on the insects, worms, clams, and crabs that live on or under the surface of the sand or mud. The abundant food in the Estuary provides shorebirds with the energy they need to migrate thousands of kilometers, between their b

Enhancing marsh elevation using sediment augmentation: A case study from southern California, USA

Tidal marshes are an important component of estuaries that provide habitat for fish and wildlife, protection from flooding, recreation opportunities, and can improve water quality. Critical to maintaining these functions is vertical accretion, a key mechanism by which tidal marshes build elevation relative to local sea level. The beneficial use of dredged material to build marsh elevations in resp

Protocol for route restoration in California’s desert renewable energy conservation plan area

In the deserts of the Southwestern United States, increased off-highway vehicle use can lead to widespread vehicular damage to desert ecosystems. As the popularity and intensity of vehicle use on public lands continues, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is challenged to manage the routes used by recreationists while minimizing activity beyond designated routes and mitigating environmental impact

Incorporation of uncertainty to improve projections of tidal wetland elevation and carbon accumulation with sea-level rise

Understanding the rates and patterns of tidal wetland elevation changes relative to sea-level is essential for understanding the extent of potential wetland loss over the coming years. Using an enhanced and more flexible modeling framework of an ecosystem model (WARMER-2), we explored sea-level rise (SLR) impacts on wetland elevations and carbon sequestration rates through 2100 by considering plan

Reproductive plasticity as an advantage of snakes during island invasion

Most invasive species are not studied during their initial colonization of ecosystems to which they were recently introduced. Rather, research is typically performed after invasive species are well established and causing harm to the native biodiversity. Thus, novel adaptations of invasive species during their initial invasions are rarely identified. The California kingsnake (Lampropeltis californ

Megafires and thick smoke portend big problems for migratory birds

In 2020, the fire season affecting the western United States reached unprecedented levels. The 116 fires active in September consumed nearly 20,822 km2 (https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/accessible-view/ Accessed 2020-09-29) with eighty percent of this footprint (16,567 km2) from 68 fires occurring within California, Oregon, and Washington. Although the 2020 fire season was the most extreme on record, it e

Range eclipse leads to tenuous survival of a rare lizard species on a barrier atoll

Rediscovery of living populations of a species that was presumed to be extirpated can generate new narratives for conservation in areas suffering from losses in biodiversity. We used field observations and DNA sequence data to verify the rediscovery of the Critically Endangered scincid lizard Emoia slevini on Dåno′, an islet off the coast of Guam in the southern Mariana Islands, where for > 20 yea

Responses of migratory amphibians to barrier fencing inform the spacing of road underpasses: A case study with California tiger salamanders (Ambystoma californiense) in Stanford, CA, USA

Migratory amphibians are at high risk of negative impacts when roads intersect their upland and breeding habitats. Road mortality can reduce population abundance, survivorship, breeding, recruitment, and probability of long-term persistence. Increasingly, environmental planners recommend installation of under-road tunnels with barrier fencing to reduce mortality and direct amphibians towards the p

Schistosome infection in Senegal is associated with different spatial extents of risk and ecological drivers for Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni

Schistosome parasites infect more than 200 million people annually, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, where people may be co-infected with more than one species of the parasite. Infection risk for any single species is determined, in part, by the distribution of its obligate intermediate host snail. As the World Health Organization reprioritizes snail control to reduce the global burden of schistosomi