DUNEX Hazards at Pea Island

USGS DUNEX Operations on the Outer Banks

USGS DUNEX Operations on the Outer Banks

DUring Nearshore Event eXperiment (DUNEX) is a multi-agency, academic, and non-governmental organization (NGO) collaborative community experiment designed to study nearshore coastal processes during storm events. 

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DUNEX Research and Experiments

USGS participation in DUNEX will contribute new measurements and models that will increase our understanding of storm impacts to coastal environments, including hazards to humans and infrastructure and changes in landscape and natural habitats.

Pea Island Experiment

Nearshore Geology

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DANGER! INSTRUMENTS IN THE WATER AT PEA ISLAND!

Metal poles and equipment will be installed on the beach and in the surf zone out to 600 yards from the shore at Pea Island, just south of New (Pea Island) Inlet, from September (after Labor Day) to mid-November. Installations may not be visible at all tides and conditions.  

These are EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS!!  

Please DO NOT SWIM, SURF, FISH, or BOAT between the signs on the beach (red zone below) and be cautious of currents that may cause you to drift into the hazardous area. 

The poles are 3” diameter and 15’ long, with about 5 feet extending above the seabed. They are used to support the instruments that continuously measure wave heights, water levels, and currents using acoustics. 

a cartoon of stick figures getting hurt in the water on poles sticking out of the seafloor bottom

The cross-shore array will pose a hazard to swimmers, boaters, fisherman, and surfers in the nearshore and should be avoided. (Credit: Jin-Si Over, Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center. Public domain.)

A 3D rendering of the beach with cartoons

The Pea Island cross-shore array will pose a hazard to swimmers, boaters, fisherman, and surfers in the nearshore and the area should be avoided about 50 m to either side of the array and up to a kilometer offshore (Credit: Jin-Si Over, Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center. Public domain.)