Contaminant Biology

Endocrine Disruption

Filter Total Items: 34
Date published: November 20, 2019
Status: Completed

Refined Model Provides a Screening Tool to Understand Exposure to Contaminants from Incidental Wastewater Reuse

Refinement of the existing national-scale “de facto reuse incidence in our nation’s consumable supply” (DRINCS) model, complemented by field measurements, provides a screening tool to understand human and wildlife exposure to toxicants and pathogens associated with the incidental reuse of treated wastewater in the Shenandoah River watershed. The model results can be accessed in a companion...

Date published: October 3, 2019
Status: Completed

Intersex in Male Smallmouth Bass in the Missisquoi River in Vermont: Understanding Factors that Can Lead to Endocrine Disruption in Field Settings

The presence of testicular oocytes (intersex) in male smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in the Missisquoi River in Vermont varied over the period of the study and was not related to concentrations of known endocrine disrupting chemicals in the River. Although previous studies have shown linkages between endocrine disrupting chemical exposures and intersex in fish, these results...

Date published: May 7, 2019
Status: Active

Sublethal Effects of Contaminants in Aquatic Food Webs—Research Challenges and Considerations for Future Studies

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and academic scientists partnered to identify challenges and provide considerations for future scientific study designs to advance our understanding of the often subtle sublethal effects of contaminants on individuals, populations, communities, and entire aquatic food webs. 

Contacts: Kelly Smalling
Date published: April 22, 2019
Status: Active

No Evidence of Toxicity to Birds Ingesting Neonicotinoid-Coated Wheat Seeds During Controlled Laboratory Study

Scientists determined what happens to the neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, on coated wheat seeds once ingested by Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)—a model species for free-range, seed-eating, upland game birds. Imidacloprid was found to be rapidly adsorbed, metabolized, and excreted, and resulted in no overt signs of toxicity during a controlled laboratory study.

Date published: December 18, 2018
Status: Completed

Long-term Studies Examine Contaminant Exposure and Reproduction of Ospreys Nesting in Two Large United States Estuaries

In a series of studies from 2010 to 2018, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists detected low levels of legacy contaminants and pharmaceuticals in osprey (Pandion haliaetus) and their food chain within the Chesapeake and Delaware River estuaries. Osprey reproductive success increased during the same period and was determined to be adequate to sustain a stable population in both...

Date published: September 26, 2018
Status: Active

Can There be Unintended Benefits when Wastewater Treatment Infrastructure is Upgraded?

Science from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other entities has shown that a mixture of natural and synthetic estrogens and other similar chemicals are discharged from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to streams and rivers.

USGS and University of Colorado hydrologists, chemists, geologists, and biologists studied the chemistry and biology of Boulder Creek downstream of Boulder ...

Date published: September 24, 2018
Status: Active

Are Tumors in Wild Fish Harvested in the Great Lakes Region Related to Contaminants in Water Resources?

Our specialized teams of scientists are working in our laboratories and at field sites around the Great Lakes in collaboration with other federal and state resource agencies to document the prevalence of skin and liver tumors in fish. Tumor prevalence in white suckers (Catostomus commersonii), a fish harvested as a food source by local communities, is related to the degree of urbanization in...

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Food Resources Science Team

The team studies the movement of toxicants and pathogens associated with food production through watersheds and aquifers, to water resources where exposure can occur. That information is used to understand if there are adverse effects upon exposure and to develop decision tools to protect health.

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Science Team

The team studies toxicants and pathogens in water resources from their sources, through watersheds, aquifers, and infrastructure to human and wildlife exposures. That information is used to develop decision tools that protect human and wildlife health.

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Toxins and Harmful Algal Blooms Science Team

The team develops advanced methods to study factors driving algal toxin production, how and where wildlife or humans are exposed to toxins, and ecotoxicology.  That information is used to develop decision tools to understand if toxin exposure leads to adverse health effects in order to protect human and wildlife health....

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Immunomodulation Science Team

The Immunomodulation Integrated Science Team focuses on contaminant and pathogen exposures in the environment that might influence the immune systems of wildlife, livestock, and companion animals. In collaboration with public-health officials, the Team also addresses potential human-health risks stemming from similar exposures.  If actual risks are identified, this Team will inform...

Date published: August 30, 2018
Status: Active

Bioactive Chemicals Research Laboratory

The Bioactive Chemicals Research Laboratory applies a collaborative transdisciplinary approach to conduct research to minimize the risk to human and aquatic organism health from exposure to contaminants in water supplies.