Cooperative Research Units

Home

Programs L2 Landing Page

The CRU program remains very productive and maintains a bright future. One of the things contributing to that bright future is a $5.6 million increase in our most recent Congressional appropriations. This amount will help us meet longstanding programmatic needs, such as filling all the vacancies in our scientific workforce and providing much-needed upgrades to our research equipment.

CRU Science
Filter Total Items: 27
Date published: October 12, 2020
Status: Active

Beavers in the Desert? The Potential for Translocated Beavers to Serve as Restoration Tools in Desert Rivers

The USGS Utah Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Utah State University (USU) is evaluating the efficacy of beaver translocation for desert river restoration by comparing the fates, space use, and dam building activity of naturally occurring and translocated beavers in the Price and San Rafael...

Date published: September 14, 2020
Status: Active

Incorporating “Big Hairy Audacious Goals” into Natural Resource Research, Management, and Conservation

Kansas is the home to a diverse aquatic community. However, many fish have been designated as species in need of conservation because of land use change, water alterations, and other human impacts. The Kansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (Kansas Unit) at Kansas State University is leading research on "big...

Date published: August 10, 2020
Status: Active

Managing Young Forest Wildlife Habitats in Rights-of-Way Landscapes

The West Virginia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is developing management strategies that may help to increase young forest habitat availability and conserve priority young forest species in the central Appalachian region.

Date published: July 13, 2020
Status: Active

Collaborating for Conservation: Coming Together to Conserve the Topeka Shiner

he U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Iowa Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (Unit) is leading research on Topeka shiner, a species listed in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to loss of critical habitat and subsequent population declines. The focus of this research is on population size and geographic distribution, and Topeka shiner food and habitat requirements.

Date published: May 11, 2020
Status: Active

Engaging Hunters in Selecting Duck Season Dates Using Decision Science

The USGS New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) have been working together on a decision making process for setting duck season dates in New York.

Date published: April 13, 2020
Status: Active

Citizen Science Helps to Inform Ornamental Fishery Decisions in Hawaii

The commercial collection of marine ornamental fishes from coral reefs for the aquarium trade is one of the most controversial fisheries in Hawai'i. Most of the controversy relates to whether the fishery is being managed sustainably. The Hawai'i Cooperative Fishery Research Unit is assessing the impact of the marine...

Date published: March 9, 2020
Status: Active

New Habitat Suitability Maps for At-Risk Herpetofauna Species in the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem

Five at-risk species of herpetofauna – the gopher tortoise, gopher frog, striped newt, southern hognose snake, and Florida pine snake – have been petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are the subjects of conservation planning efforts of federal, state, and other partners in the Southeast.

Date published: February 19, 2020
Status: Active

2019 CRU Year in Review Story Map

Established in 1935, the Cooperative Research Units Program is a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey, Universities, State fish and wildlife agencies, the Wildlife Management Institute, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Date published: February 10, 2020
Status: Active

Oxbow Restoration in Iowa with an Emphasis on Topeka Shiner

The Iowa Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is leading research on two projects focusing on oxbow restorations and the federally endangered Topeka shiner. These projects have provided insight into the habitat preferences and fish assemblage associations of Topeka shiner in oxbows, compared the occurrence and abundance of the species in restored and unrestored oxbows.

Date published: December 16, 2019
Status: Active

Yellowstone's Migrating Bison Manipulate Springtime Green-Up

The USGS Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit coauthored a paper titled “Migrating bison engineer the green wave” published recently in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a leading journal publishing new discoveries across many disciplines. 

Date published: November 11, 2019
Status: Active

Species Status Assessments to Support Endangered Species Decision Making

The USGS Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and the USGS Leetown Science Center are partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to re-envision the way science supports endangered species decision making. The USFWS is required under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) to consider the health of species at risk of extinction.

Date published: October 14, 2019
Status: Active

https://wildlifemanagement.institute/brief/october-2019/kirtlands-warbler-delisted

On October 8, 2019, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the Kirtland’s warbler, one of the initial species added to the Endangered Species Act (ESA), had recovered enough to be removed from protection under the ESA. The songbird that nests only in the young jack pine forests in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ontario...

The Cooperative Research Units Program conducts research on a wide range of disciplines related to fish, wildlife, and natural resource management. Our 40 Units collectively conduct research on virtually every type of North American ecological community. 

Data and Tools Technical Publications
Filter Total Items: 104
Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the South Wind River Herd in Wyoming

Mule deer within the South Wind River herd make short- and medium-distance migrations from the foothills near Lander, Wyoming, into the Wind River Range and around its southern flanks (fig. 31). The longest migration in this herd is a 75-mile (121-km) route originating south of Lander near Twin Creek. Deer following this long-distance route traverse the southern edge of the Wind River

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Pronghorn in the South of Interstate 40 Herd in Arizona

Interest in the movement of pronghorn south of Arizona’s Interstate 40 (I-40) began when telemetry data from 1999 – 2004 showed seasonal round-trip movements upwards of 100 miles. In 2018, high-resolution GPS location data confirmed persistence of this remarkable pronghorn migration. This herd resides primarily in Game Management Unit 8, which had a population estimate of

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration routes of mule deer in the Pequop Mountains, Nevada

The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of th

Date published: November 9, 2020

Wyoming Game and Fish Department Designated Migration Corridor of mule deer in the Baggs Herd, Wyoming

The Baggs Mule Deer Corridor was officially designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in 2018 (fig. 24). The Baggs Herd is managed for approximately 19,000 animals, and the corridor is based on two wintering deer populations: a northern and southern segment. Animals in the north segment occupy a relatively small winter range along a pinyon-juniper ridge that runs alo

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Atlantic Rim South Population in Wyoming

Mule deer in the Atlantic Rim South population are part of the Baggs herd unit that is managed for approximately 19,000 animals. These mule deer winter in the sagebrush canyons and basins north and west of Baggs, Wyoming and migrate north and east 20–50 mi (32–80 km) to various summer ranges (fig. 23). Many of these deer must navigate coal-bed methane developments situ

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Red Desert Population in Wyoming

Mule deer within the Red Desert population, part of the larger Sublette herd, make the longest ungulate migration ever recorded in the lower 48 states (fig. 33). Here, mule deer travel an average one-way distance of 150 mi (241 km) from the Red Desert in the south to the Gros Ventre Range and Teton Range in the north. This migration originates in the desert sagebrush basins of the R

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Platte Valley Herd in Wyoming

The Platte Valley Herd Corridor was designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in 2018 (fig. 30). The Platte Valley herd contains approximately 11,000 mule deer. The corridor is based on two wintering populations, including a south segment from Saratoga, Wyoming, to the Colorado State line, and a north segment from Saratoga to the Dana Ridge area north of I-80. Winter ranges

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Elk in the Jackson Herd in Wyoming

Elk within the Jackson herd have been the focus of management for over a century. The herd, which numbers between 9,000 -13,000, winters in Jackson Hole. Most of the herd winters in the sagebrush basins and irrigated fields of the National Elk Refuge, with less than a quarter of the herd wintering in the Gros Ventre drainage to the east. Migrating animals travel an average one-way dista

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah

The Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah is home to a prolific mule deer herd numbering around 5,200 individuals in 2019. In early October, these mule deer begin their migration from the Plateau traveling south distances up to 78 miles to winter range in the Buckskin Mountains near the Utah-Arizona border. Approximately 20-30% of the Paunsaugunt Plateau herd reside in northern Arizona durin...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States, Volume 1

Here we provide the data archive for the publication Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States (Kauffman et al. 2020). This includes the collection of GIS/spatial data that are made available in the report. A few exceptions to data inclusions: Idaho data, routes from Grand Teton National Park deer in the Red Desert herd in Wyoming. The Ungulate Migrations of the Western United St

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration corridors of mule deer in the Ruby Mountains, Nevada

The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migratio...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Ryegrass Population in Wyoming

The Ryegrass mule deer population is part of the larger Sublette herd that winters in the northwest portion of the Green River Basin, west of the Green River and north of Cottonwood Creek (fig. 34). In severe winters, these deer may travel southeast to The Mesa, Ross Ridge, or Reardon Draw areas. The Ryegrass region supports approximately 1,500 to 2,000 deer that migrate northwest

Filter Total Items: 2,921
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Range-wide declines of northern spotted owl populations in the Pacific Northwest: A meta-analysis

The northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) inhabits older coniferous forests in the Pacific Northwest and has been at the center of forest management issues in this region. The immediate threats to this federally listed species include habitat loss and competition with barred owls (Strix varia), which invaded from...

Franklin, Alan B.; Dugger, Katie M.; Lesmeister, Damon B.; Davis, Raymond J.; Wiens, J. David; White, Gary C.; Nichols, James D.; Hines, James E.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Schwarz, Carl J.; Ackers, Steven H.; Stevens, Andrew L.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Brown, Robin G.; Burgher, Jesse; Burnham, Kenneth P.; Carlson, Peter C.; Chestnut, Tara; Conner, Mary M; Dilione, Krista E.; Forsman, Eric D.; Glenn, Elizabeth M.; Gremel, Scott A.; Hamm, Keith A.; Herter, Dale R.; Higley, J. Mark; Horn, Rob B.; Jenkins, Julianna M.; Kendall, William L.; Lamphear, David W; McCafferty, Christopher; McDonald, Trent L.; Reid, Janice A; Rockweit, Jeremy T.; Simon, David C.; Sovern, Stan G.; Swingle, James; Wise, Heather

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

The precarious position of wildlife conservation funding in the United States

The Pittman-Robertson Act was established in 1937 to fund state-based wildlife conservation through an existing excise tax on sporting arms and ammunition. Because these items were purchased mostly by hunters at the time, they were the user group primarily funding wildlife conservation. Subsequent amendments to Pittman-Robertson expanded the...

Duda, Mark D.; Beppler, Tom; Austen, Douglas S.; Organ, John F.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Habitat heterogeneity, temperature, and primary productivity drive elevational gradients in avian species diversity

AimAnticipating and mitigating the impacts of climate change on species diversity in montane ecosystems requires a mechanistic understanding of drivers of current patterns of diversity. We documented the shape of elevational gradients in avian species richness in North America and tested a suite of a priori predictions for each of five mechanistic...

Dillon, Kristen G.; Conway, Courtney J.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Blue sucker habitat use in a regulated Texas river: Implications for conservation and restoration

Species conservation requires a clear understanding of habitat availability and subsequent use of those habitats. In cases where species declines have occurred and gone undetected by conservation managers, habitat alteration, fragmentation, and loss are often the largest contributors. River fragmentation often results in altered flow regimes,...

Acre, Matthew Ross; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Leavitt, Daniel J.; Smith, Nathan G.; Pease, Allison A.; Pease, Jessica E.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Epigean crayfish of the Potomac River Basin in West Virginia: Zoogeography, natural history and conservation

Crayfish are an aquatic fauna of conservation concern, yet regional studies are lacking on zoogeography and life history. We compared recent and historical species distribution data and assessed conservation standings of native and nonindigenous crayfish of the Potomac River Basin in West Virginia. From 2007–2011, a total of 1764 crayfish were...

Loughman, Zachary J.; Sykes, Audrey M.; McKinney, Matthew I.; Welsh, Stuart A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Acoustic tag retention and tagging mortality of juvenile cisco Coregonus artedi

Release of hatchery-reared juvenile cisco (Coregonus artedi) is an important tool for recovering Great Lakes populations, but post-release survival is unknown. Telemetry using small acoustic tags provides opportunities to assess the efficacy of hatchery-reared fish releases. However, better understanding of the tolerance of juvenile...

McKenna, James E.; Sethi, Suresh; Scholten, Grant Marvin; Kraus, Jeremy W.; Chalupnicki, Marc

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Life history and population dynamics

Lake charr Salvelinus namaycush life history and population dynamics metrics were reviewed to evaluate populations inside (n = 462) and outside (n = 24) the native range. Our goals were to create a database of metrics useful for evaluating population status and to test for large-scale patterns between metrics and...

Hansen, Michael J; Guy, Christopher S.; Bronte, Charles R.; Nate, Nancy A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Stormwater systems as a source of marine debris: A case study from the Mediterranean coast of Israel

Drainage (or stormwater) systems are a potential source of marine debris. Approximately 67 km (33%) of the land along the Mediterranean coast of Israel is considered urban, covered by concrete and asphalt. The purpose of the present pilot study was to determine the composition of the solid waste in a drainage system and evaluate to what...

Pasternak, Galia; Ribic, Christine; Spanier, Ehud; Zviely, Dov

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Exploring relationships among stream health, human well-being, and demographics in Virginia, USA

Quantification of empirical relationships between ecosystem health and human well-being is uncommon at broad spatial scales. We used public data for Virginia (USA) counties to examine pairwise correlations among two indicators of stream health, thirteen indicators of human well-being, and four demographic metrics. Our indicators of stream health...

Angermeier, Paul; Marc J. Stern; Krometis, Leigh Anne; Hemby, Tyler L.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Groundwater discharges as a source of phytoestrogens and other agriculturally derived contaminants to streams

Groundwater discharge zones in streams are important habitats for aquatic organisms. The use of discharge zones for thermal refuge and spawning by fish and other biota renders them susceptible to potential focused discharge of groundwater contamination. Currently, there is a paucity of information about discharge zones as a potential exposure...

Tyler J. Thompson; Briggs, Martin; Phillips, Patrick J.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Smalling, Kelly; Kolpin, Dana W.; Wagner, Tyler

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Movement of synthetic organic compounds in the food web after the introduction of invasive quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) in Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona, USA

Introductions of dreissenid mussels in North America have been a significant concern over the last few decades. This study assessed the distribution of synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) in the food web of Lake Mead, Nevada/Arizona, USA and how this distribution was influenced by the introduction of invasive quagga mussels. A clear spatial...

Goodbred, Steven L.; Rosen, Michael R.; Patino, Reynaldo; Alvarez, David; Echols, Kathy R.; King, Kerensa; Umek, John

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Factors influencing Cinnamon Teal nest attendance patterns

Patterns of nest attendance in birds result from complex behaviours and influence the success of reproductive events. Incubation behaviours vary based on individual body condition, energy requirements and environmental factors. We assessed nest attendance patterns in Cinnamon Teal Spatula cyanoptera breeding in the San Luis Valley of...

Setash, Casey M.; Kendall, William L.; Olson, David

Under the guidelines of the Cooperative Research Agreement, CRU is required to communicate with funders, cooperators, stakeholders, and the public. CRU maintains outreach pathways and participation among state, federal, university, and private researchers.

Filter Total Items: 53
 Adaptive Management and Monitoring of Pyramid Lake, Nevada UT
July 23, 2019

Adaptive Management and Monitoring of Pyramid Lake, Nevada UT

Pyramid Lake, Nevada, is one of the last remaining strongholds for lacustrine Lahontan cutthroat trout; almost all other large lake populations have undergone population declines or extirpation as a result of habitat degradation, overharvest, and water diversions, all compounded by the stocking of nonnative species. The population depends almost entirely on stocking

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
White-tailed deer and chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

White-tailed deer

Distribution map: distribution of chronic wasting disease in North America

Chronic wasting disease may have long-term negative effects on white-tailed deer, a highly visible and economically valuable keystone species, according to a 

...
 Assessing the impact of nutrient enrichment in the Henry's Fork Headwaters
July 9, 2019

Assessing the impact of nutrient enrichment in Utah

Rivers in the western U.S. rivers are experiencing changes in nutrient loading because of rapid urban development, but the effects of changing nutrient loading on the structure and function of stream ecosystems, especially fish habitat, are not fully understood. The Henry’s Fork of the Snake River in east Idaho is a wide, shallow, clear, spring-fed river whose fish habitat

...
A brook floater filter feeding as it is anchored into the sediment of a stream bottom.
July 3, 2019

Brook floater mussel

A brook floater filter feeding as it is anchored into the sediment of a stream bottom. Habitat loss is a long-recognized problem for many endangered species, and the brook floater is no exception. In-stream alterations that change flow and alter sediment loads can affect downstream locations where freshwater mussels live. Further, human encroachment from development, run-

...
Shovelnose sturgeon
June 3, 2019

Shovelnose sturgeon

Shovelnose sturegon. Understanding the

...
Elk fitted with global positioning system tracking collar
June 3, 2019

Elk fitted with global positioning system tracking collar

Matt Kauffman, Unit Leader, USGS Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, second from left, works with Wyoming Game and Fish Department and University of Wyoming collaborators to release an elk fitted with a global positioning system (GPS) tracking collar.

Green sweat bee visits a blackberry flower
May 29, 2019

Green sweat bee visits a blackberry flower

Fruits of Her Labor: the flower on the left has been pollinated and the fruit is developing, but the flower on the right is still being pollinated, highlighting the importance of bees to humanity's food resources. 

Filter Total Items: 28
Date published: November 20, 2020

Bird of Courage

When celebrating Thanksgiving with your family this year, remember that the turkey is not just the main course, but, as Benjamin Franklin said, it’s also a noble fowl deeply rooted in American tradition. 

Date published: November 12, 2020

New Maps Document Big-Game Migrations Across the Western United States

LARAMIE, Wyo. – For the first time, state and federal wildlife biologists have come together to map the migrations of ungulates – hooved mammals such as mule deer, elk, pronghorn, moose and bison – across America’s West. The maps will help land managers and conservationists pinpoint actions necessary to keep migration routes open and functional to sustain healthy big-game populations.

Date published: September 27, 2017

Research to Recover Threatened Waterfowl: USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Supervisor Receives Prestigious U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Champion Award

USGS scientist James “Barry” Grand, Ph.D., has been named a 2016 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Champion (Region 7) for his exemplary long-term research on two formerly threatened species, the spectacled eider and Alaska-breeding Steller’s eiders.

Date published: May 3, 2017

Migrating mule deer track “green waves” of spring forage: study highlights importance of habitat corridors for migrating game and other species

Migratory mule deer in Wyoming closely time their movements to track the spring green-up, providing evidence of an underappreciated foraging benefit of migration, according to a study by University of Wyoming and U.S. Geological Survey scientists at the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.

Date published: December 22, 2016

A Grand Slam for Students, Schools and Science

"It’s a grand slam for all involved,” said Dawn Childs, USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units.  “Recent high school graduates with special needs get real-world experience while helping USGS scientists on projects ranging from grizzly bears and energy to historic documents and bird migration. And a school system gets to successfully train students to enter the workforce."

Date published: November 17, 2016

Wild Turkey Talk

A group of turkeys is referred to as either a rafter or a gang.  So this Thanksgiving, when celebrating with your own gang, remember the turkey as more than just the main course, but, as Benjamin Franklin said so many years ago, as a noble fowl of American tradition.

Date published: July 31, 2016

Hot off the Press! Great Balls of Fire!

The USGS Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit in partnership with the Nebraska Intelligent MoBile Unmanned Systems Lab (NIMBUS) and the Applied Complex Adaptive Systems Lab have designed a drone prototype that drops balls filled with combustible material that ignites fire as part of prescribed fire management.

Date published: May 6, 2016

Happy Mother’s Day to Moms of All Species

USGS wishes to honor all mothers, of all species. Many of our research findings have and are shedding light on the lives of non-human moms.  

Date published: March 16, 2016

Shorebirds Ignore Aircraft, But Pay Attention to People, Off-road Vehicles

The American oystercatchers studied on Cape Lookout National Seashore in North Carolina were disturbed more by pedestrians and off-road vehicles passing their nests than the U.S. military aircraft flying overhead.

Date published: December 10, 2015

Continued Decline of the Northern Spotted Owl Associated with the Invasive Barred Owl, Habitat Loss, and Climate Variation

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Northern spotted owl populations are declining in all parts of their range in the Pacific Northwest, according to research published in The Condor. Based on data from 11 study areas across Washington, Oregon and northern California, a rangewide decline of nearly 4 percent per year was estimated from 1985 to 2013.

Date published: March 10, 2015

Endangered Flying Squirrel Relegated to Living on Sky-Islands

Habitat loss has fragmented the population of the Carolina northern flying squirrel, an endangered species now living on “sky-islands” on nine isolated mountain peaks in the southern Appalachians.

Date published: March 2, 2015

Wildlife Researchers to Give Public Close-Up, Real-Time View of Big Game Fieldwork

LARAMIE, WY — Seeking insights to help moose, elk, mule deer and bighorn sheep populations, researchers from the University of Wyoming, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, the U.S. Geological Survey and other partners will spend much of March capturing animals on their winter ranges in western and southern Wyoming.