Are there earthquakes associated with Mount Hood?

Felt earthquakes on Mount Hood (Oregon) occur every 2 years on the average. Seismic monitoring, in effect since 1977, indicates a generalized concentration of earthquakes just south of the summit area and 2-7 kilometers below sea level. A seismic swarm in July 1980, during which nearly 60 earthquakes (mostly 5-6 kilometers deep with a maximum bodywave magnitude of 2.8) recorded in a 5-day period, prompted development of an emergency response plan to coordinate local authorities in the event of future eruption. -- From: Swanson, et.al., 1989, IGC Field Trip T106: Cenozoic Volcanism in the Cascade Range and Columbia Plateau, Southern Washington and Northernmost Oregon: American Geophysical Union Field Trip Guidebook T106.

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How would an eruption of Mount Rainier compare to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens?

Eruptions of Mount Rainier usually produce much less volcanic ash than do eruptions at Mount St. Helens. However, owing to the volcano's great height and widespread cover of snow and glacier ice, eruption-triggered debris flows ( lahars ) at Mount Rainier are likely to be much larger -- and will travel a greater distance -- than those at Mount St...

What is the greatest hazard presented by Mount Rainier?

Debris flows ( lahars ) pose the greatest hazard to people near Mount Rainier. A debris flow is a mixture of mud and rock debris that looks and behaves like flowing concrete. Giant debris flows sometimes develop when large masses of weak, water-saturated rock slide from the volcano's flanks. Many of these debris flows cannot be predicted and may...

Does Portland, Oregon, have a volcano within its metropolitan area?

Metropolitan Portland, Oregon, like Auckland, New Zealand, has most of a Plio-Pleistocene volcanic field within its metropolitan area. The Boring Volcanic Field includes at least 32 and possibly 50 cinder cones and small shield volcanoes . The youngest volcano (Beacon Rock) in the Volcanic Field erupted about 57,000 years ago. All existing...

How dangerous is Mount Rainier?

Although Mount Rainier has not produced a significant eruption in the past 500 years, it is potentially the most dangerous volcano in the Cascade Range because of its great height, frequent earthquakes , active hydrothermal system , and extensive glacier mantle. Mount Rainier has 26 glaciers containing more than five times as much snow and ice as...

How many eruptions have there been in the Cascades during the last 4,000 years?

Eruptions in the Cascades have occurred at an average rate of one to two per century during the last 4,000 years, and future eruptions are certain.

What is the origin of the name "Mount St. Helens"?

Some Indians of the Pacific Northwest variously called Mount St. Helens 'Louwala-Clough,' or 'smoking mountain.' The modern name, Mount St. Helens, was given to the volcanic peak in 1792 by seafarer and explorer Captain George Vancouver of the British Royal Navy. He named it in honor of fellow countryman Alleyne Fitzherbert, who held the title ‘...

How old is Mount St. Helens?

The eruptive history of Mount St. Helens began about 40,000 years ago with dacitic volcanism, which continued intermittently until about 2,500 years ago. This activity included numerous explosive eruptions over periods of hundreds to thousands of years, which were separated by apparent dormant intervals ranging in length from a few hundred to...

How much ash was there from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens?

During the 9 hours of vigorous eruptive activity on May 18, 1980, about 540 million tons of ash from Mount St. Helens fell over an area of more than 22,000 square miles. The total volume of the ash before its compaction by rainfall was about 0.3 cubic mile, equivalent to an area the size of a football field piled about 150 miles high with fluffy...

How high was Mount St. Helens before the May 18, 1980 eruption? How high was it after?

Before May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens ' summit altitude of 9,677 feet (2,950 meters) made it only the fifth highest peak in Washington State. It stood out handsomely, however, from surrounding hills because it rose thousands of feet above them and had a perennial cover of ice and snow. The peak rose more than 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) above its...

How far did the ash from Mount St. Helens travel?

The May 18, 1980 eruptive column at Mount St. Helens fluctuated in height through the day, but the eruption subsided by late afternoon. By early May 19th, the eruption had stopped. By that time the ash cloud had spread to the central United States. Two days later, even though the ash cloud had become more diffuse, fine ash was detected by systems...
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Date published: May 18, 2017

Ever Vigilant: USGS Marks the 37th Anniversary of Mount St. Helen's Eruption and the 35th Anniversary of the Cascades Volcano Observatory

Today, in 1980, Mount St. Helens unleashed the most devastating eruption in U.S. history. Two years later, USGS founded the Cascades Volcano Observatory to monitor Mount St. Helens and all the Cascades Volcanoes.

Date published: May 1, 2017

May is Volcano Preparedness Month in Washington State

May is Volcano Preparedness Month in Washington, providing residents an opportunity to become more familiar with volcano hazards in their communities and learn about steps they can take to reduce potential impacts.

Date published: September 12, 2016

EarthWord–Subduction

It’s not flirting for submarines, but this week’s EarthWord does feature the ocean...

Date published: August 22, 2016

EarthWord–Tephra

Look! In the sky! It’s a bird, it’s a plane! Wait, run, it’s this week’s EarthWord!

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A perspective view of Mount hood
December 31, 2017

A perspective view of Mount hood

A perspective view of Mount hood, made from the OR_Sandy_River_2007 lidar data

snow-covered Mt. Hood volcano on the horizon overlooking tall building in city of Portland
December 31, 2012

Mount Hood

Mount Hood dominates the skyline outside Portland, Oregon on a clear day. A major eruption of Mount Hood would pose a great hazard to the regional economy.

May 9, 2012

Volcano Web Shorts 4 - Instruments

USGS technologist Rick LaHusen describes how the development and deployment of instruments plays a crucial role in mitigating volcanic hazards.

May 9, 2012

Volcano Web Shorts 3: Seismology

USGS volcano seismologist, Seth Moran, describes how seismology and seismic networks are used to mitigate volcanic hazards.

mount hood
December 16, 2010

Mount Hood, OR

View of Mount Hood from Pittock Mansion, Portland, OR.

Trillium Lake with Mount Hood in the background

Trillium Lake with Mount Hood in the background

Trillium Lake with Mount Hood in the background