National Land Imaging Program

National Land Imaging Highlights

NOTE: Information and links in National Land Imaging Highlights are current at the time the information is posted.

2018

2018 William T. Pecora Award: Nominations being accepted through June 15, 2018.

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that have made outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Nominations for the 2018 award must be received by June 15, 2017.

 

2017

Dr. Darrel Williams and International Charter for Space and Major Disasters Team receive 2017 Pecora Awards

Dr. Darrel Williams, individual award, and International Charter for Space and Major Disasters Team, group award, were announced as the recipients of the award.

Pecora 20 Call for Abstracts and Pecora Award Nominations Deadlines Extended

The 20th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium will be held November 14-16, 2017, in Sioux Falls, SD. The theme of Pecora 20 is 'Observing a Changing Earth: Science for Decisions...Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection.' With an emphasis on recent developments in remote sensing, the symposium program will focus on applications of satellite and other Earth observations to monitor, assess, and perform projections of future land and water resources, as well as big data and other analytical technologies to improve decision making using satellite data. The deadline to submit abstracts has been extended to July 1, 2017. The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to recognize outstanding contributions by individuals or groups toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Any individual or group (domestic or international) working in the field of remote sensing of the Earth is eligible to receive the William T. Pecora Award. This year's awards will be presented at the 20th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium mentioned above. The 2017 Pecora Award nominations submission date has been extended to June 15, 2017.

Pecora 20: Call for Abstracts and Award Nominations

20th William T. Pecora Memorial Remote Sensing Symposium will be held November 14-16, 2017, in Sioux Falls, SD. With an emphasis on recent developments in remote sensing, the theme of Pecora 20 is "Observing a Changing Earth: Science for Decisions...Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection." The symposium will offer a program focused on applications of satellite and other Earth observations to monitor, assess, and perform projections of future land and water resources, as well as big data and other analytical technologies to improve decision making using satellite data. Submit abstracts and Pecora Award nominations through June 1, 2017.

2017 William T. Pecora Award: Nominations being accepted through June 1, 2017

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that have made outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. The Department of the Interior (DOI) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly sponsor the award. The award was established in 1974 to honor the memory of Dr. William T. Pecora,
former Director of the U.S. Geological Survey and Under Secretary, Department of the Interior. Dr. Pecora was a motivating force behind the establishment of a program for civil remote sensing of the Earth from space. His early vision and support helped establish what we know today as the Landsat satellite program. The Award Committee must receive nominations for the 2017 award by June 1, 2017. Instructions for preparing a nomination and other information about the award can be found on the Pecora Award web site.

 

2016

2016 William T. Pecora Award Recognizes Excellence in Earth Observation

Dr. Curtis E. Woodcock, individual award, and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), group award, were announced as the recipients of the award.

2016 William T. Pecora Award: Nominations being accepted through June 10, 2016

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that have made outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Nominations for the 2016 award must be received by June 10, 2016.

Landsat 8 Thermal Data Update

Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) data continue to be collected with the scene select mirror encoder electronics disabled (mode 0). While in this mode, the TIRS line of sight model (LOS) will be regularly updated and modifications are being made to automate revisions to the LOS in the Level-1 Product Generation System (LPGS). 
Landsat 8 Operational Land Imagery (OLI) and TIRS data that have been collected through the 4th quarter of 2015 (October-December) will be reprocessed into nominal Level-1 products containing valid TIRS data, and will be available in February 2016. 
TIRS data acquired during the 1st quarter of 2016 (January-March) will be reprocessed and made available in April. A strategy is being developed for generating near-real time products moving forward while operating in mode 0. More details will be posted on the Landsat Missions Web site as they become available.

 

2015

A New Era of Space Collaboration between Australia and U.S.

On June 18, 2015 in Canberra, Australia, the U.S. Geological Survey and Geoscience Australia signed a comprehensive new partnership to maximize land remote sensing operations and data that can help to address issues of national and international significance.

USGS Ups Ease of Use for Landsat Data

The USGS has begun production of higher-level (more highly processed) Landsat data products to help advance land surface change studies. One such product is Landsat surface reflectance data. Surface reflectance data products approximate what a sensor held just above the Earth's surface would measure, if conditions were ideal. The precise removal of atmospheric artifacts increases the consistency and comparability between images of the Earth's surface taken at different times of the year and different times of the day.

NASA,USGS Begin Work on Landsat 9

NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have started work on Landsat 9, planned to launch in 2023, which will provide mission-critical continuity in the Earth-observing program's record of land images.

2015 William T. Pecora Award: Nominations being accepted through June 15, 2015

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that have made outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Nominations for the 2015 award must be received by June 15, 2015.

Landsat Seen as Stunning Return on Public Investment

Taking a hard look at the value of Landsat to the U.S. economy was the goal of the Landsat Advisory Group of the National Geospatial Advisory Committee. The team of commercial, state/local government, and non-profit geospatial information experts updated a critical review of the value of Landsat information that was recently released to the public. Their conclusion states the economic value of just one year of Landsat data far exceeds the multi-year total cost of building, launching, and managing the satellites and sensors. The impressive return emphasizes Landsat's role as a crucial national asset comparable to the satellite-based GPS system and National Weather Service satellites. Empowered by free access to the Landsat data archive since 2008, researchers are examining our planet in much greater detail.

Tournament Earth 2015

The #2 seed in NASA's Tournament Earth 2015 competition took the Landsat 8 image of the colorful faults of Xinjiang, China to the championship. Coinciding with college basketball's "March Madness" tournament, NASA's online voting used the same bracket format to determine a favorite image. The winning image, selected by readers of the web site, was a first for a Landsat image.

Remote Sensing's Special Issue on Landsat 8 Characterization and Calibration

The sensors on Landsat 8-the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)-are a new kind of technology for the Landsat series. These pushbroom scanners are a change from their whiskbroom predecessors. This means their individual characteristics and calibrations can produce differences in data characteristics and quality. A special issue of the journal Remote Sensing aims to provide a good understanding of the radiometric and geometric properties of the Landsat 8 instruments and their data. Two calibration scientists from the USGS EROS Center were guest editors for the issue, in which 18 open access papers cover the design, calibration, and spectral and radiometric characterization of the OLI and TIRS.

 

2014

Christopher Justice and Landsat 8 Receive 2014 Pecora Awards

The Department of the Interior's U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA presented the 2014 William T. Pecora Award for achievement in Earth remote sensing to Christopher O. Justice, professor and chair of geographical sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park, was honored for advancing the understanding of the Earth by means of remote sensing. The government and industry team that built and now operates Landsat 8, the latest in the Landsat series of satellites, was also acknowledged for their contributions to study of Earth's land surface and coastal regions.

Enhanced Elevation Data to Sharpen Global Focus on Climate Issues

September 23, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS, a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior) released a collection of higher-resolution (more detailed) elevation datasets for Africa. The datasets were released following the President's commitment at the United Nations to provide assistance for global efforts to combat climate change. The broad availability of more detailed elevation data across most of the African continent through the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) will improve baseline information that is crucial to investigating the impacts of climate change on African communities.

Satellites: Make Earth Observations Open Access

Changes in land cover affect the global climate by absorbing and reflecting solar radiation, and by altering fluxes of heat, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and other trace gases. Detailed assessments-regional, global, daily, and seasonal-of land use and land cover are needed to monitor biodiversity loss and ecosystem dynamics. Satellite imagery is the best source of such data, especially over large areas. In many cases, satellite data are restricted or charged for. Not true for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) satellite imagery. A new era of open-access satellite data began in 2008 when the USGS released its Landsat archive, the world's largest collection of Earth imagery, to the public free of charge. According to an article by Michael A. Wulder and Nicholas C. Coops in Nature magazine: "Freely available satellite imagery will improve science and environmental-monitoring products."

Landsat and Water: Using Space to Advance Resource Solutions

A recent White House-led assessment found that Landsat is among the Nation's most critical Earth observing systems, second only to GPS and weather. A new USGS study,Landsat and Water - Case Studies of the Uses and Benefits of Landsat Imagery in Water Resources, provides examples of why Landsat is so valuable. Water is managed by many levels of federal, state, local, and tribal governments; by the private sector; through the courts; and through international and interstate treaties and compacts. At all these levels, water users and managers rely more and more on Landsat data about water conditions both at the moment and in the context of four decades of Landsat record.

USGS Role in the National Earth Observing Plan

Fundamental knowledge of the land and its resources is a basic need for effective government and a productive economy in any nation. More than 30 countries now have Earth observing satellites, reflecting a wide range of national priorities around the world for environmental monitoring and economic growth. With minimal restrictions, Earth observation data provided through public funding are made open to the public to advance human knowledge and enable private industry to provide value-added commercial services. The plan includes a list of 145 high-impact Earth observation systems. The top 15 systems form a select top tier and are ranked in order of importance, according to carefully identified priorities. USGS systems make up three of the top 15. First on the prioritized list is the Global Position System (GPS). In second place is the national weather radar network, Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD). The USGS-related programs that follow are Landsat (ranked 3rd), airborne lidar mapping (8th), and the USGS streamgage network (13th).

Released: National Plan for Civil Earth Observations

Today, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released a National Plan for Civil Earth Observations that aims to maximize the value of observations collected by Federal agencies of the Earth's land surfaces, oceans, and atmosphere. The Plan is a blueprint for future Federal investments in and strategic partnerships to advance Earth observing systems that help protect life and property, stimulate economic growth, maintain homeland security, and advance scientific research and public understanding.

Released: Summary of Moderate Resolution Imaging User Requirements

USGS is developing a functional capability to obtain, characterize, manage, maintain and prioritize all Earth observing, land remote sensing user requirements. The goal is a better understanding of community needs that can be supported with land remote sensing resources, and a means to match needs with appropriate solutions in an effective and efficient way. The requirements gathered in this study were utilized as input to the USGS-NASA Sustainable Land Imagery report currently being developed, and as an input and requirement elicitation enhancement for the on-going USGS National Land Imaging Requirements Project.

2014 Pecora 19 Symposium "Sustaining Land Imaging: UAS to Satellites" 
DEADLINE: June 20, 2014

The Pecora Symposium series was established by the USGS and NASA in the 1970s as a forum to foster the exchange of scientific information and results derived from applications of remotely sensed data to a broad range of land-based resources. The Technical Program Committee seeks presentations and posters that highlight past remote sensing successes, current investigations, technological advances for assessing the Earth's systems, and operational monitoring of land surface.

A Landsat 8 Yearbook: Earth Images for Everyone

To mark an extremely successful first year of space operation for Landsat 8, the scientists and imagery experts at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science Center have selected 10 sets of images that demonstrate the broad range of changes on the land that Landsat 8 has observed in its first year and compiled them in a special collection - the Landsat 8 Yearbook.

New Teaching Resource for Remote Sensing

Comparing Landsat satellite images over multiple years reveals slow and subtle changes as well as rapid and devastating ones. The Tracking Change Over Time lesson plan (grades 5-8), enhances students' learning of geography, earth science, and problem solving by seeing landscape changes from space. The lesson plan includes an introduction to satellite images, an introduction to remote sensing, instructions on how to use the free software MultiSpec, and modules that go deeper into specific areas of remote sensing application. The latest module, "River Flooding," is now available. Students discover how a flood in June 2008 affected southern Indiana and Illinois. The module takes a problem-based approach to show students how satellite images can be used to analyze the changes that a flood causes. The images used in the lesson, along with supplementary materials, are also available at http://eros.usgs.gov/educational-activities.

2014 William T. Pecora Award Announcement: Nominations Accepted through May 1, 2014

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that have made outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Nominations are accepted for public and private sector individuals, teams, organizations, and professional societies. Both national and international nominations are welcome.

Landsat 8 - Year One!

It has been a full year since the launch of the Landsat 8 satellite! During this time, over 160,000 Landsat 8 images have been acquired and made available to users worldwide. Landsat 8 is the latest success in a decades-long NASA and U.S. Geological Survey partnership that has provided a continuous record of change across Earth's land surfaces since 1972.

Making Outstanding Landsat Data Even Better

The USGS is committed to continually improving the data coming from its latest satellite, Landsat 8. Since its launch in February 2013, the project's engineers have been refining the data as they learn more about the performance of the satellite. On February 3, 2014, the Landsat 8 archive will be cleared from the online cache and reprocessed to take advantage of calibration improvements identified during its first year of operation. All Landsat 8 scenes will be removed from the online cache at this time and these data will then be reprocessed starting with the most recent acquisitions and proceeding back to the beginning of the mission. Reprocessing is expected to take approximately 50 days. Most users will not need to reorder data currently in their local archive; however, users are encouraged to review all Landsat 8 calibration notices and evaluate the improvements as they relate to specific applications.

 

2013

Technical Announcement: AmericaView Wins Major Competitive Grant from USGS

AmericaView, a university-led, state-based consortium designed to promote remote sensing science and technology, was awarded a nearly $1 million National Land Remote Sensing Education Outreach and Research Activity grant by the U.S. Geological Survey this week through a competitive process. AmericaView will use the increased funding to further develop the national consortium; expand the science of remote sensing through education; and promote awareness of remote sensing technology for providing crucial insight into such issues as environmental climate monitoring, natural resource management, land cover mapping, projected land use change, and disaster analysis.

Chelton Receives 2013 Pecora Award for Achievements in Ocean Remote Sensing

The Department of the Interior's U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA presented the 2013 William T. Pecora Award for achievement in Earth remote sensing to Dudley B. Chelton, distinguished professor of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University, Corvallis. Chelton was recognized for his contributions to ocean remote-sensing science, education, and applications.

Funding Opportunity Closed September 2013: USGS was soliciting applications from qualified Educational Institutions, State and Local Governments, and Non-profit Organizations (NPOs) for a National Land Remote Sensing Education Outreach and Research Activity (NLRSEORA).

This effort involves the development of a U.S. national consortium to expand the science of remote sensing through education, outreach and research / applications development in areas such as environmental monitoring to include the effects of climate variability on water availability (or lack thereof) and phenology; public health related issues to include identification of potential indicators relating to vector-borne diseases; natural resource management, land cover mapping, land use change and disaster analysis.

Technical Announcement: USGS Completes Decommissioning of Landsat 5

On June 5, 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey Flight Operations Team transmitted the last command to the Landsat 5 satellite, effectively terminating the mission 29 years, 3 months and 4 days after its launch by NASA from Vandenberg Air Force Base on March 1, 1984. The Landsat program is a joint effort between USGS and NASA.

Landsat 8 Set to Extend Long Run of Observing Earth

Landsat 8, the latest in the Landsat series of Earth observation satellites, officially began its mission on May 30 to extend an unparalleled four-decade record of Earth's land surface as seen from space. The Landsat program is a joint effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and NASA. NASA launched the Landsat Data Continuity Mission satellite on February 11. Since then, NASA mission engineers and scientists, with USGS collaboration, have been putting the satellite through its paces - steering it into its orbit, focusing the instruments, calibrating the detectors, and collecting test images. Now fully mission-certified, the satellite will be transferred to USGS operational control and renamed Landsat 8.

Landsat 8 - Going Operational

The Landsat Data Continuity Mission satellite, launched February 11, 2013, is now almost fully checked out. On May 29-30, NASA and the USGS will conduct a Post Launch Assessment Review and a Mission Transition Review at the USGS Climate and Land Use Change Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, SD. Immediately following the reviews, NASA will transfer the satellite to the USGS, when it will officially become Landsat 8, with free data distribution slated to begin on May 31.

LDCM/Landsat 8 Sample Data available!

Data collected by the OLI and TIRS sensors aboard LDCM on March 18, 2013 is available for download.

First Images Released From Newest Earth Observation Satellite

NASA and the Department of the Interior's U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have released the first images from the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) satellite, which was launched Feb. 11.

Interior Prepares to Conduct Landsat 8 Scientific Programs After Successful Launch of Latest Earth-Observing Satellite

VANDENBERG AFB, CA - Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar today joined NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Water and Science Anne Castle, United States Geological Survey (USGS) Director Dr. Marcia McNutt and other Interior and NASA officials to launch the nation's newest Earth-observing satellite into space.

Landsat 5 Sets Guinness World Record For 'Longest Operating Earth Observation Satellite'

Landsat 5 successfully set the new Guinness World Records title for 'Longest-operating Earth observation satellite' as stated in an e-mail from Guinness World Records sent to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Outliving its three-year design life, Landsat 5 delivered high-quality, global data of Earth's land surface for 28 years and 10 months. 

Observing Tomorrow: Continuing Landsat's Long Look at Our Changing World

NASA, in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey, will launch the Nation's next Earth-observing satellite from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on February 11. Landsat images from space are not just pictures. They contain many layers of data collected at different points along the visible and invisible light spectrum. Consequently, Landsat images can show where vegetation is thriving and where it is stressed, where droughts are occurring, where wildland fire is a danger, and where erosion has altered coastlines or river courses. 

 

2012

Mission Accomplished for Landsat 5

Today the U.S. Geological Survey announced that Landsat 5 will be decommissioned over the coming months, bringing to a close the longest-operating Earth observing satellite mission in history. By any measure, the Landsat 5 mission has been an extraordinary success, providing unprecedented contributions to the global record of land change. The USGS has brought the aging satellite back from the brink of failure on several occasions, but the recent failure of a gyroscope has left no option but to end the mission.

2012 Pecora Awards Presented for Achievements in Earth Remote Sensing

The U.S. Geological Survey (a bureau of the Department of the Interior) and NASA presented the 2012 William T. Pecora awards for achievement in earth remote sensing to Gilberto Camara of Brazil's National Institute for Space Research and Leung Tsang of the University of Washington in Seattle.

Lidar Confirms Sandy's Dramatic Coastal Change Impacts and Future Coastal Vulnerability

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.- The extent of Hurricane Sandy's wrath -- and the future coastal vulnerability of the region -- is clear in a new U.S. Geological Survey analysis of recently collected lidar coastal data. The research documented particularly dramatic impacts within the Fire Island National Seashore on Long Island, NY.

North Carolina, Delmarva Coastlines Changed by Hurricane Sandy

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - The USGS has released a series of aerial photographs showing before-and-after images of Hurricane Sandy's impacts on the Atlantic Coast. Among the latest photo pairs to be published are images showing the extent of coastal change in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware.

Project to Support Future Global Food Security Enhanced by Major NASA Grant

A $3.5 million dollar, 5-year grant from the NASA program: Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs), was recently awarded to a U.S. Geological Survey led, multi-agency team of scientists studying future global food security.

Photos Reveal Severity of Hurricane Sandy's Coastal Impacts

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - The USGS has released a series of aerial photographs showing before-and-after images of Hurricane Sandy's impacts on the Atlantic Coast.

Landsat Science Team to Help Guide Next Landsat Mission

Landsat satellites have witnessed over four decades of changes on Earth. In advance of the next Landsat spacecraft launch, the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), announces the selection of the Landsat Science Team. Read More...

Technical Announcement: International Landsat Cooperators to Confer in Sioux Falls

As Landsat continues to circle Earth, international partners of the Landsat program in almost a dozen locations downlink and process the data, sharing images with a global community of scientists, engineers, and land managers. These partners meet annually for the Landsat Technical Working Group (LTWG) meeting, which will be held this year in Sioux Falls, S.D., Sept. 24-28

VOTE Your Favorite! - A Contest to Celebrate 40 Years of Landsat

During a span of 40 years, since 1972, the Landsat series of Earth observation satellites has become a vital reference worldwide for understanding scientific issues related to changes on the Earth's surface. To celebrate the 40th Anniversary of Landsat, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA would like your help in selecting the top five "Earth as Art" images from the more than 120 images in the collection. The poll is now open and will close on July 6.

Aging Landsat 5 Changes Glasses

Landsat 5 has orbited Earth over 150,000 times since it was launched in 1984, making it the longest-operating Earth observing satellite of its kind. During this time, two data collection instruments onboard Landsat 5 - the thematic mapper (TM) and the multi-spectral scanner (MSS) - have transmitted over five million images of land conditions to U.S. and international ground stations.

Landsat Contest Offers View of Local Landscape Change from Space

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the United States' Landsat Earth-observing program, NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are holding a contest that will offer winners customized satellite views of changing local landscapes.

USGS Seeks Landsat Science Team Proposals

USGS EROS in Sioux Falls, SD has a requirement for research and technical support on scientific and engineering topics related to the development and support of the USGS Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) and follow-on missions. The government anticipates multiple awards from this solicitation.

Request for Information - Landsat Data Continuity Concepts

The Land Remote Sensing Program seeks information and industry capability insights for "Landsat Data Continuity Concepts." The primary objective of this RFI is to explore approaches to providing a cost-efficient, dependable, long-term source for Landsat-like data to follow the Landsat Data Continuity Mission or Landsat 8 scheduled for launch in 2013.

Landsat 5 Suspension of Operations Extended

Landsat 5 Earth imaging operations have been suspended for an additional 90 days while the U.S. Geological Survey Flight Operations Team (FOT) continues to investigate options for the resumption of imaging.

Technical Announcement: High Resolution OrbView - 3 Images Now Available from USGS

OrbView-3 satellite images collected around the world between 2003 and 2007 by Orbital Imaging Corporation (now GeoEye) at up to one-meter resolution can now be downloaded at no cost through USGS EarthExplorer. (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov)

 

2011

Landsat 5 Mission in Jeopardy

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has stopped acquiring images from the 27-year-old Landsat 5 Earth observation satellite due to a rapidly degrading electronic component. For several months, the Landsat flight operations team has been closely tracking the fluctuating performance of an amplifier essential for transmitting land-surface images from the Landsat 5 satellite to ground receiving stations in the U.S. and around the world. Over the past 10 days, problems with the amplifier have led to drastically reduced image download capabilities, a sign of impending failure.

Pecora Award Recognizes Stellar Achievements in Earth Observation

The U.S. Department of the Interior and NASA presented the 2011 William T. Pecora awards to Alan H. Strahler, professor of geography and environment at Boston University, and to the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing at a ceremony Tuesday in Herndon, Va.

Landsat Adds to World Memory

A United Nations group established to preserve humanity's documentary history has selected a portion of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat archive of Earth imagery to be added to the Memory of the World International Register.

Landsat Images Illustrate Flooding from Irene in New York State

Remnants of Hurricane Irene caused heavy flooding, as shown in this August 31 Landsat 5 image, in the hamlet of Pine Island in the town of Warwick (Orange County), New York. Sometimes called "the drowned lands" (long before Irene), the fertile black dirt region is the remains of a great shallow lake formed by receding glaciers.

Landsat Imagery Tracks Record Flooding in Minot, N.D.

The Landsat 7 satellite recorded the flooding of the city of Minot, North Dakota, at its peak on June 25, 2011, when the Souris River in north central North Dakota surpassed an 1881 record flood reading by a wide margin.

Arizona Wildfire Sweeps Through Apache National Forest: Satellite Image

Burning in the mountains of eastern Arizona near the border with New Mexico, the Wallow Fire has become the second largest fire in Arizona history.

Landsat Tracks Long Tornado Swath in Massachusetts

The track of a tornado that cut a massive 39-mile swath of destruction across southwest and south-central Massachusetts on June 1 is graphically depicted by an image from the Landsat 5 satellite.

Library of Congress Hosts USGS Earth as Art Exhibit

The most recent USGS Earth as Art exhibit, the third in the series of award-winning Landsat satellite images, will be on display at the Library of Congress beginning May 31. "The striking beauty revealed in these Landsat images, acquired nearly 450 miles above Earth's surface, reminds us that scientists pursue their calling not just out of curiosity, but because they are inspired by the natural world," said USGS Director Marcia McNutt. "We are delighted to share 'our Muse' with the public through this exhibit at the Library of Congress."

Extended!! Pecora 18: Call for Abstracts - Deadline May 27, 2011

Deadline has been extended to Friday May 27! Land remote sensing data users, researchers, applications scientists, producers, managers, and policy-makers are cordially invited to participate in this important symposium by submitting an abstract for a paper or poster. The Pecora Symposium series was established by the USGS and NASA in the 1970s as a forum: 1) to foster the exchange of scientific information and results derived from applications of remotely sensed data to a broad range of land-based resources; and 2) to provide a forum for discussing ideas, policies, and strategies concerning land remote sensing.

Satellite Imagery of Earth Accessible to Public on "ChangeMatters" Website

A new geospatial website, "ChangeMatters," has made the DOI's satellite imagery of the world more easily accessible to the public. Developed by Esri, the site allows users to view the Global Land Survey (GLS) Landsat data developed by USGS and NASA, which spans a time period from 1975 to 2005. By viewing GLS satellite imagery throughout the world, anyone can monitor and map change between epochs resulting from events such as forest harvesting, urban growth, wildfires, floods, pest outbreaks, and drought.

2011 William T. Pecora Award: Nominations being accepted through June 1, 2011

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that have made outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Nominations for the 2011 award must be received by June 1, 2011.

Pecora 18: Call for Abstracts - Deadline May 16, 2011

Land remote sensing data users, researchers, applications scientists, producers, managers, and policy-makers are cordially invited to participate in this important symposium by submitting an abstract for a paper or poster. The Pecora Symposium series was established by the USGS and NASA in the 1970s as a forum: 1) to foster the exchange of scientific information and results derived from applications of remotely sensed data to a broad range of land-based resources; and 2) to provide a forum for discussing ideas, policies, and strategies concerning land remote sensing.

Landsat: Who are the Customers?

Exactly who uses Landsat satellite imagery and what value do they derive from the information?

USGS Releases Report on Uses, Users, and Value of Landsat

Survey results revealed that respondents from multiple sectors use Landsat imagery in many different ways. The value of Landsat imagery to these users was demonstrated by the high importance placed on the imagery, the numerous benefits received from projects using Landsat imagery, the negative impacts if Landsat imagery was no longer available, and the substantial willingness to pay for replacement imagery in the event of a data gap. The diversity of the sample delivered results that provide a baseline of knowledge about the users, uses, and value of Landsat imagery. While the results supply a wealth of information on their own, they can also be built upon through further research to generate a more complete picture of the population of Landsat users as a whole.

USGS Releases Report on Uses, Users, and Value of Landsat

Survey results revealed that respondents from multiple sectors use Landsat imagery in many different ways. The value of Landsat imagery to these users was demonstrated by the high importance placed on the imagery, the numerous benefits received from projects using Landsat imagery, the negative impacts if Landsat imagery was no longer available, and the substantial willingness to pay for replacement imagery in the event of a data gap. The diversity of the sample delivered results that provide a baseline of knowledge about the users, uses, and value of Landsat imagery. While the results supply a wealth of information on their own, they can also be built upon through further research to generate a more complete picture of the population of Landsat users as a whole.

Pecora Award Recognizes Stellar Achievements in Earth Observation

The prestigious 2010 William T. Pecora Award has been presented to the U.S. Air Force Eagle Vision Team for providing invaluable support to homeland security, humanitarian aid and natural disaster recovery efforts.

 

2010

Pecora Award Recognizes Stellar Achievements in Earth Observation

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and NASA have presented the 2010 William T. Pecora Award to Marvin E. Bauer of the University of Minnesota for his pioneering work in remote sensing of natural resources. Dr. Bauer received the award today at the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing meeting in Orlando, Fla.

United States Launches New Global Initiative to Track Changes in Land Cover and Use

Deputy Secretary of the Interior Hayes today announced that the US is launching a new global initiative to developing the first-ever comprehensive and up-to-date database of 30-meter satellite imagery to show changes in land cover and land uses worldwide.

New Landsat Data Release

The Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD) version 1.5 and new interfaces were released from USGS EROS today (2008 and 2009: CONUS and Alaska, annual, seasonal, monthly, weekly 30m Landsat ETM+ products). The WELD products are available via anonymous FTP in tiled HDF format ftp://weldftp.cr.usgs.gov and in GeoTIFF format for any user defined area via an interactive internet interface http://weld.cr.usgs.gov/. There is a new documentation web site http://globalmonitoring.sdstate.edu/projects/weld/.

Technical Announcement: Finding Imagery of Disasters Gets Graphic

After a major disaster, a satellite image or a collection of aerial photographs is frequently the fastest, most effective way to determine the scope and severity of the event. With that goal, the USGS operates the Hazard Data Distribution System (HDDS) to process and deliver satellite and aerial imagery in near-real time during natural or human-caused disasters.

Interior Continues Leadership Role in Land Remote Sensing Under National Space Policy Announced by the President

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Space Policy announced by the White House today recognizes and endorses the Department of the Interior's expertise and accomplishments in land imaging and remote sensing to advance global climate change research and provide data for science and natural resource management.

Technical Announcement: USGS and Spot Image Corporation Announce Data Agreement

The U.S. Geological Survey will receive nearly unlimited access to imagery collected by Spot Image satellites over the continental United States under a major data purchase agreement announced today.

Media Advisory: USGS to Host Congressional Briefing on Landsat

Science requires perspective and objectivity. The U.S. Geological Survey provides both with data from the Landsat series of satellites. On Friday, March 26, 2010, the USGS will host a congressional briefing on how the Landsat program provides impartial, authoritative information about land conditions for use in agriculture, forestry, regional planning, education, and global change research.

Earth Observation Day (EO Day)

EO Day is an education and awareness effort of the AmericaView Consortium, a USGS grant recipient. AmericaView is working through partner academic consortia to implement and support local, regional, and global remote sensing data-gathering activities during EO Day. Consortia partners will also work with K-16 teachers, students, and faculty to perform pre- and post EO Day activities including data gathering, analysis, and reporting.

Video - Remote Sensing Data From the USGS: the latest developments

Major events in the USGS satellite program are underway according to Ronald E. Beck, a Public Information Specialist with the U.S. Geographical Survey . Since Landsat satellite data became available through a no-cost download in 2009, over 2 million individual scenes have been captured by users representing over 180 countries. Additionally, the USGS has greatly expanded the list of aerial photography, additional satellite data and supplemental earth information available through the download system. To learn more about developments in remote sensing data, Landsat 5 and 7 and the Landsat Data Continuity Mission go to http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/189.

Landsat 5 Anomaly

On December 18, 2009, the transmitter on Landsat 5 that sends image data to the ground encountered technical difficulties. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat Flight Operations Team has extensive experience with this type of anomaly and is currently investigating the problem.

 

2009

Pecora Award Recognizes Stellar Achievements in Earth Observation

The prestigious 2009 William T. Pecora Award for outstanding contributions to the understanding of the Earth by means of remote sensing has been presented to Dr. Forrest Hall of the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Team led from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center.

A New Album of Global Earth Imagery

A new collection of selected Landsat earth images worldwide, Global Land Survey 2005 (GLS2005), is now available for free download to any user around the globe. Nearly 10,000 satellite images, each covering approximately 100 X 100 miles, are available from the recently completed 2005 data set. All GLS images can be previewed and downloaded for free at either of two USGS web sites: Glovis (http://glovis.usgs.gov) or Earth Explorer (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov).

USGS Scientists Survey Users of Moderate-Resolution Satellite Imagery

Understanding the benefits and value of the imagery provided by moderate-resolution satellites, such as Landsat, is essential as future land-imaging initiatives move forward. To identify the importance of these images, USGS researchers are conducting a comprehensive, Web-based survey of nearly 4,000 moderate-resolution imagery users. The survey, initiated by the USGS Land Remote Sensing Program, is the most comprehensive assessment of users and uses of moderate-resolution imagery to date. Survey recipients were selected using a unique "snowballing" method to identify a cross-section of professional users across all sectors (government, academic, private, nonprofit). The survey aims to (1) identify and classify the breadth and depth of the users and uses of moderate-resolution imagery, and (2) understand the importance and value of Landsat imagery in decision making. The study will also summarize the financial impacts on users and their work if Landsat imagery, currently available at no cost, were not available, and assess their willingness to pay for replacement imagery. Results will be relevant to government, academia, and private industry because they will establish a baseline understanding of professional users as well as the value and uses of satellite imagery in their work. In particular, managers in the USGS Land Remote Sensing Program will use these results to support their efforts to ensure data continuity, better serve users, and augment Landsat benefits. The survey will be launched later this month, with results expected in early 2010.

New Bulk Download Tool for Landsat Free Data

For the first 1.1 million free Landsat scenes, users had to download one scene at a time. The Landsat Project has developed a bulk download tool so users can more easily download entire lists. After uploading a list of Landsat Scene IDs, scenes that are available on-line can be immediately downloaded. For those scenes that need to be processed, a link is provided directly into our EarthExplorer ordering system (there is no charge for processing). GloVis, EarthExplorer, or user-generated Landsat Scene ID lists can be used.

Landsat Plays Key Role in Water-Use Map

Data from earth-observing Landsat satellites play a central role in a new, award-winning type of mapping that tracks water use. Water-use maps help save taxpayer money by increasing the accuracy and effectiveness of public decisions involving water-for instance, in monitoring compliance with legal water rights. The maps are especially important in dry western states where irrigated agriculture accounts for about 85 percent of all water consumption.

USGS Releases Remote Sensing Data on Annual Biological Cycles

Salazar Announces Satellite Data on Nature's Timing Can Help Track Climate Change The USGS has made its long-term historical remote sensing data and graphics about biological life-cycle events available to the public at no charge on the web, Secretary of the Interior Salazar announced today.

Landsat 5 Fully Operational After Brief Interruption

Landsat 5, the quarter-century-old satellite workhorse, is back in its traces. When the historically reliable earth observation satellite began tumbling in space on the morning of August 13, engineers from the USGS Landsat Flight Operations Team immediately started processes to protect the satellite and to restore capability.

Landsat 5 is back in business!

Landsat 5 tumbled out of control in the early morning of August 13. Full operational capabilities restored. The cause of the malfunction is still being investigated.

Free Landsat Scenes Go Public by the Million

On August 17, someone who wanted to see how the Earth looks from 440 miles away in space downloaded the one-millionth Landsat satellite image scene from a U.S. Geological Survey web site at its Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Since the USGS opened its full Landsat archive to user access at no charge last October, the response from across the nation and around the globe has grown exponentially.

Landsat 5 Anomaly

Landsat 5 experienced an anomaly in the early morning hours of August 13, 2009. The Flight Operations Team (FOT) is assessing the problem and testing spacecraft systems. No imaging will occur until further notice.

USGS Played Crucial Role in Moon Landing, Apollo Program

U.S. Geological Survey scientists and cartographers played an important but relatively unknown role during the Apollo 11 moon landing 40 years ago this week.

USGS Astrogeologists Contribute to "Moon in Google Earth"

Astrogeologists at the U.S. Geological Survey here provided critical data sets used in the latest release of planetary exploration tools from Google, Inc. The updated software enables users to explore the moon in high detail, including the Apollo 11 landing site.

Information Derived from Classified Materials Aids Understanding of Changing Climate

Images derived from classified materials are now available to the public through the US Geological Survey's website to support environmental analysis of global climate-related science, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced today.

USGS Releases Remote Sensing Data on Annual Biological Cycles

Interior Secretary Salazar Announces Satellite Data on Nature's Timing Can Help Track Climate Change. The USGS long-term historical remote sensing data and graphics about biological life-cycle events is now available to the public at no charge on the web.

Pinpointing Drought Coast to Coast

Take vast quantities of satellite remote sensing data. Season with time. Mix generously with information about climate, soils, and recent rainfall. These are the ingredients for the Vegetation Drought Response Index.

USGS Scientist Receives Prestigious Award

Dr. Thomas Loveland, Senior Scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center has been named a 2009 Fellow for the American Society for Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry

Designed for 3 years, ''workhorse'' satellite completes 25

Outliving its expected 3-year lifespan by more than 22 years, on March 1 Landsat 5 completed a busy quarter-century of collecting information about and observations of the planet Earth's land mass and seems to still be going strong.

May 1, 2009- William T. Pecora Award Nominations deadline.

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to recognize outstanding contributions by individuals or groups toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Any individual or group (domestic or international) working in the field of remote sensing of the Earth is eligible to receive the William T. Pecora Award.

Remote Sensing documents change [PODCAST]

Ronald E. Beck, a Public Information Specialist with the U.S. Geographical Survey recently spoke at the Kingsport Public Library (http://www.kingsportlibrary.org/podcast.php) about how remote sensing can document physical changes on earth. Click on the RSS link to view the complete video of his discussion. (Approximately 53 minutes).

 

2008

Pecora Award Recognizes Stellar Achievements in Earth Observation

The prestigious 2008 William T. Pecora Award for outstanding contributions to the understanding of the Earth by means of remote sensing has been presented to Samuel N. Goward of the University of Maryland-College Park and the QuikSCAT Mission Team.

Group on Earth Observations Heralds Free, Global Access to USGS Earth Imagery

In a breakthrough applauded today by the international Group on Earth Observations, scientists and decision-makers will soon have unrestricted global access at no charge to the USGS Landsat archive, the world's most extensive collection of continuously-acquired land imagery.

Wireless Sensor Networks Workshop Sept. 16 - 17

The USGS Geography Discipline is hosting a two-day Wireless Sensor Network workshop at the Winter Park Lodge, Winter Park Colorado on September 16th and 17th, 2008.

RFI: Landsat Raw Data Products

The US Geological Survey seeks information to determine if there is interest by one or more commercial or non-profit vendors in offering Landsat products beyond those available from the US Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS has available Landsat TM and ETM+ data in a raw, uncorrected format (Level-0R) so that these data could be processed to user specifications (projection, datum, and resampling method). Responses are due by September 12, 2008. Details can be found at FedBizOpps.

DOI Secretary Kempthorne Showcases Free Public Availability of Landsat Image Archive at ESRI Conference

"With the click of a mouse, scientists, government officials and land managers will be able to see the changes in the earth's landscape at any point in the past three and a half decades," Kempthorne told the audience on Saturday.

USGS Accelerates Access to Satellite Data

Federal and state agencies that need satellite imagery from commercial sources will find it much easier to acquire the data through a streamlined process managed by the U.S. Geological Survey.

National Treasure Expands: National Archives to Include Earth Imagery

The story of the Nation's land during the last 75 years can be told impartially through records of earth observation - aerial photographs dating from the 1930s and satellite images dating from the 1960s. Preserving important records of the Nation's history while providing convenient public access to them is a vital responsibility of government. To meet this responsibility, NARA and USGS have signed an agreement creating a cooperative framework for how the two Federal agencies will ensure the preservation and access of the massive earth imagery and geospatial data resources currently archived by the USGS at EROS.

Boldly Going Where No Man (or Woman) Goes: USGS Unmanned Aircraft

Landsat Satellite Imagery Used to Assess the Impact of Myanmar's Cyclone Nargis

USGS Awards Satellite Imagery Contracts: Enhancing Access to Users

Imagery for Everyone

By February 2009, any Landsat archive scene selected by a user will be processed, at no charge, automatically to a standard product recipe and staged for electronic retrieval. Users will have access to global scenes dating back to Landsat 1.

EXTENDED! to May 15, 2008 - William T. Pecora Award Nominations deadline.

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to recognize outstanding contributions by individuals or groups toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. Any individual or group (domestic or international) working in the field of remote sensing of the Earth is eligible to receive the William T. Pecora Award.

Pecora 17 Call for Abstracts -- DEADLINE April 11, 2008

The Pecora 17 Conference will be held Monday through Thursday, November 17 to 20, 2008 at the Adams Mark Hotel in Denver, Colorado. Full details of this conference and abstract guidelines may be found at http://www.asprs.org/Pecora17.

Landsat 5 Satellite Back in Action

Recent Virginia Wildfires Captured on Satellite

Recent VA-NC Wildfires- On Feb 11, Landsat 7 captured approximately 6,000 acres of burned area south of Richmond and Petersburg, VA. The 2 blue areas represent recently burned acreage. The orange color on the edge of the blue areas indicates active fires at the time the image was captured.

LRS Administered AmericaView partners with SPOT

LRS Administered AmericaView partners with SPOT to expand access to high-resolution satellite imagery for U. S. colleges and universities through the web via www.americaview.org. "This program will make high quality, high resolution satellite imagery available to colleges and universities, providing a higher level of practical training to the next generation of remote sensing data users," said Bruce Ogden, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for SPOT Image.

Abstract Deadline 2/15/2008- 4th Annual LRS Science Symposium

The USGS Geography Discipline Land Remote Sensing (LRS) Program is hosting the 4th Annual Land Remote Sensing Science Symposium titled "Meeting Tomorrows Challenges Today" on March 11-12, 2008, in the USGS Flagstaff facility in Arizona. The purpose of the conference is to showcase remote sensing research activities being conducted across the USGS.

 

2007

Excellence in Earth Observation Honored

Kempthorne-Led U.S. Group on Earth Observations Announces Scientific Initiatives

Taking a Long View from Space (PODCAST)

Learn what the USGS is doing in space, land remote sensing, the future of Landsat, and more with Barbara Ryan, USGS Associate Director for Geography.

Secretary Kempthorne Leads U.S. Delegation to International Earth Observation Summit in South Africa

USGS Provides Compelling Images of Alabaugh Canyon Fire

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is pleased to announce the release of the TerraLook data product.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is pleased to announce the release of the TerraLook data product.

Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. of Boulder, Colo. was selected to develop the Operational Land Imager instrument for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM)

Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. of Boulder, Colo. was selected to develop the Operational Land Imager instrument for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The LDCM is the successor to Landsat 7 and is scheduled for launch in July 2011. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. will manage the LDCM development in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS will be responsible for LDCM operations after launch and on-orbit checkout.

White House Plan Calls for Interior to Host New Program for Nation's Land Imaging Efforts

The White House announced on August 14 the release of a plan for a national land-imaging program. The plan will serve as the framework for continuing the collection of moderate resolution multispectral remote-sensing data for the globe. The new program will be established at the U.S. Department of the Interior and will provide focused leadership and management for the nation's land-imaging efforts. See links below for more information: Plan for National Land Imaging Program Report Announcement [PDF] (http://www.landimaging.gov/U.S._Releases_Plan_For_National_Land_Imaging_...) Plan for National Land Imaging Program Report [PDF 6.79MB] (http://www.landimaging.gov/fli_iwg_report_print_ready_low_res.pdf)

USGS Pilot Project Makes High-Quality Landsat Data Available Through Web

Commerical Remote Sensing Data Contract (CRSDC) directly support the President's Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy

Commerical Remote Sensing Data Contract (CRSDC) The CRSDC directly support the President's Commercial Remote Sensing Space Policy, signed in 2003, by providing a centralized mechanism for civil agencies to acquire commercial remote sensing products to support their mission needs in an efficient and coordinated way.

Commercial Satellite Imagery Companies Partner with the U.S. Geological Survey in Support of the International Charter "Space and Major Disasters"

Commercial Satellite Imagery Companies Partner with the U.S. Geological Survey in Support of the International Charter "Space and Major Disasters"

2007 ASPRS Outstanding Service Award

2007 ASPRS Outstanding Service Award: LRS employees Barron R. Bradford, Raymond A. Byrnes, John W. Cullen, Martin Eckes, Jay W. Feuquay, and Bruce K. Quirk, and others who are part of the Future Land Imaging Interagency Working Group will be awarded the 2007 Outstanding Service Award at the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Professional Society's annual meeting, May 9, in Tampa, FL. They will be recognized for their efforts in developing a long term U.S. strategy for moderate resolution land imaging satellites. The interagency working group is led by Gene Whitney, Chair, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President. For more information see

USGS Collaborates on Unique, Comprehensive View of Antarctica

Landsat In Oribt...It Keeps Going and Going

On March 1, 2007, the Landsat 5 satellite began 24 years in orbit. This milestone is particularly impressive considering its operational lifespan was thought to be no more than three years. On April 15, 2007, Landsat 7 will complete its eighth year of operation. Landsat data is a vital component of an incredible array of research that includes wildfire mapping, crop identification, timber harvesting, desertification, climate change, habitat suitability and urban expansion. Data gathered by Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 continue to form the backbone of the 35-year-old global Landsat archive (http://glovis.usgs.gov) which contains millions of images of Earth's terrestrial environment and is maintained at the USGS Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science.

U.S.-Canadian Science Pact to Improve Monitoring of Land Cover, Biodiversity, Climate Change

EarthNow!

EarthNow! displays data received from the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites as they pass over the United States. When a Landsat satellite passes within range of the ground station at the USGS EROS center, image data are downlinked and displayed in near-real time. When Landsat 5 and 7 are not in range, the most recent 10 passes are repeated until the satellites are back in range. EarthNow! was created as an outreach tool by the Landsat project at the EROS center, and a version was installed on Nov. 11, at the Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

 

2006

DOI and NASA Honor Achievements in Remote Sensing

The Department of the Interior (DOI) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have announced the winners of the 2006 William T. Pecora Award, a prestigious federal award given to individuals and groups to recognize significant achievements in remote sensing. The 2006 Pecora Group Award was presented to the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Team for developing innovative techniques for providing unique atmospheric ozone, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol data for more than 25 years. The presentation took place at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting on December 13, 2006, in San Francisco.12/14/2006

LRS goes Smithsonian!

LRS goes Smithsonian! LRS is the principle sponsor of the new Earth from Space traveling exhibition for the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. The exhibition and complimentary website celebrate the contributions satellites have made in understanding our planet

Hyperion Systematic Terrain-Corrected (Level 1Gst) Data Product

Hyperion Systematic Terrain-Corrected The USGS Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science, in cooperation with NASA, is pleased to announce the release of a new Systematic Terrain-Corrected (Level 1Gst) data product from the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Hyperion sensor. This new processing option provides increased quality and improved geometric accuracy for the Hyperion data product. The new Hyperion product is available for $500 per scene, and may be searched and ordered through Earth Explorer (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov) or the USGS Global Visualization Viewer (http://glovis.usgs.gov).

New Orleans RADARSAT-1 Subsidence Preliminary Announcement of Opportunity

Deadline: Oct 20, 2006 New Orleans RADARSAT-1 Subsidence Preliminary Announcement of Opportunity: "The Canadian Space Agency (CSA), in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), will be launching an Announcement of Opportunity for researching new developments in interferometric applications of RADARSAT-1 data and innovative mapping approaches to better illustrate subsidence."

The Future of Land Imaging

The White House has initiated a year-long study called The Future of Land Imaging to explore options for United States operational use of satellites to better serve society. The USGS serves on the leadership team of this Federal interagency working group.

Landsat 5 has returned to full operations

The Landsat Project is pleased to announce that Landsat 5 has returned to full operations--On March 17, 2006, Landsat 5 experienced a problem with its radio transmitter, preventing transmission of science data to ground receiving stations. The team expects reliable operations of data transmission for the foreseeable future

EO-1 Update

NASA has extended the EO-1 mission through FY07, with the possibility of further extensions. In this mission phase, EO-1 has been transformed into an on-orbit test bed for advanced technology and hyperspectral research; however, individual users can still acquire new scenes or archived scenes through the USGS

Call for Nominations for 2006 William T. Pecora Award; Deadline: April 30, 2006

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that have made outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. The Department of the Interior (DOI) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly sponsor the award. Instructions for preparing a nomination and other information about the award can be found on the Pecora Award Web site.

Interruption of Landsat 5 Acquisitions

An unexpected problem has occurred in Landsat 5's ability to transmit data, causing an interruption in acquisitions. Engineers are studying the problem and testing is underway. Updates will be posted as more detailed information becomes available.

22 years and Still Ticking -- Landsat 5 Beats Expectations

The Landsat 5 satellite, launched on March 1, 1984, has completed 22 years of record-setting Earth observations. In an era of "overnight success" and disposable products, there is no better example of dependability, economy, and achievement than the Landsat 5 Earth-observing satellite. Because of the sophisticated equipment on board, engineers anticipated a life of a mere two years, with a goal of three years of collecting data over the landmass of the planet. Instead, Landsat 5 has become the longest continuously serving observation system in the U.S. civilian fleet. The track record for this satellite is nothing short of phenomenal.

Science Fair April 4-6, 2006

The USGS Geography Land Remote Sensing (LRS) Program is hosting a "USGS Remote Sensing Science Fair" on April 04-06, 2006, in the USGS Auditorium, Building 810, Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colorado. The purpose of the conference is to showcase the Remote Sensing research activities within the U.S. Geological Survey. The event will highlight current and potential remote sensing science and activities in both commercial and classified arenas.

Landsat 5 Resumes Operations

USGS and NASA engineers successfully adjusted the solar array enabling data acquisition operations to resume.

 

2005

Landsat Data Continuity Mission

"The Administration has directed NASA and the USGS to team up on development, launch, and operation of a "free-flyer" Landsat Data Continuity Mission, wherein NASA will procure an on-orbit data acquisition capability and then turn it over to the USGS to operate in order to ingest, archive, process, and distribute Landsat-type data products. By some estimates, such a capability would become operational early in 2011."

In response to the USGS initiative to make more Landsat data readily available

Orthorectified Landsat data is now available for free download from the USGS. The Orthorectified Landsat data is available from the Global Visualization Viewer( GloVis) at http://glovis.usgs.gov and Earth Explorer at http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov

Landsat 5 Experiencing Technical Difficulties

DOI and NASA Honor Scientists for Achievements in Remote Sensing

Hazard Response

Hazard Response: Remote Sensing data are being used by the Hazard Data Distribution System. Both pre-event and post-event information is available from this site. Users may preview data sets via the interactive map viewer and then download data free-of-charge or submit an order for any of the available data to be delivered on DVD or firewire/usb drives.

The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Workshop

The conference will be held June 14-16, 2005, at the USGS in Reston, Virginia. All SRTM data production has been completed, and the data are now being used in numerous applications. To help document the SRTM data quality and characteristics, and to describe applications benefiting from the data, a workshop is beingconvened for the SRTM data user community.

LRS Science Fair

Remote Sensing Research from around the country will be presented in the USGS Headquarter's Auditorium on April 12-13, 2005, from 8:30 a.m.-5:00 pm.

President Bush proposes increase in the USGS Landsat 7 Funding for FY 2006

The President's budget calls for increasing the Landsat 7 budget by $12 million so that this important earth-imaging satellite program can continue to provide critical information to scientists, emergency relief officials, land managers and planners.

USGS Scientist Honored by the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS)

USGS Director Leads U.S. Delegation to Group on Earth Observations (GEO)-6 Meeting in Brussels

Landsat 7 Data Enhancements

Development of a major new product enhancement for Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data. Gap-filled product options will not allow the data merged of one or more SLC-off fill scenes for generation of a final gap-free image.

 

2004

High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop

High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop will be held November 8-10, 2004, at the U.S. Geological Survey National Center, Reston, Virginia. NOTE Registration Deadline Extended to Nov. 3, 2004.

RFI Released

In support of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, an RFI was released on Aug. 5, 2004, to solicit innovative approaches to developing and managing a successor system to Landsat 7.

Price Reduction

USGS REDUCES PRICE FOR LANDSAT 7 SCENES WITH GAPS RESULTING FROM THE MAY 2003 ANOMALY

USGS ANNOUNCES NEW PRODUCT LINE

A technique to estimate radiometric values in Landsat 7 data gaps has been selected, and the resulting new products will be available to customers in June 2004.

U.S. Digital Landsat Mosaics Educational CD-ROM set

U.S. Digital Landsat Mosaics Educational CD-ROM set of satellite images provides a valuable record of land surface conditions of the U.S. in the early 1990's.

Landsat 7 anomaly

Visit http://landsat.usgs.gov for information about the Landsat 7 anomaly.

 

2003

Remote Sensing Policy

The President authorized a new national policy on April 25, 2003, that establishes guidance and implementation actions for commercial remote sensing space capabilities. Visit crsp.usgs.gov for more information.