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Natural Hazards

Every year in the United States, natural hazards threaten lives and livelihoods and result in billions of dollars in damage. We work with many partners to monitor, assess, and conduct targeted research on a wide range of natural hazards so that policymakers and the public have the understanding they need to enhance preparedness, response, and resilience.

News

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The Monitor Newsletter - Vol. 10 | Issue February 2023

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Columbia River Gorge Landslides - New Interactive Geonarrative

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USGS Remote Sensing Data Tracks Coastal Erosion from California Storms

Publications

Revising supraglacial rock avalanche magnitudes and frequencies in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

The frequency of large supraglacial landslides (rock avalanches) occurring in glacial environments is thought to be increasing due to feedbacks with climate warming and permafrost degradation. However, it is difficult to (i) test this; (ii) establish cause–effect relationships; and (iii) determine associated lag-times, due to both temporal and spatial biases in detection rates. Here we applied the

Damage amplification during repetitive seismic waves in mechanically loaded rocks

Cycles of stress build-up and release are inherent to tectonically active planets. Such stress oscillations impart strain and damage, prompting mechanically loaded rocks and materials to fail. Here, we investigate, under uniaxial conditions, damage accumulation and weakening caused by time-dependent creep (at 60, 65, and 70% of the rocks’ expected failure stress) and repeating stress oscillations

Comparison of ventifact orientations and recent wind direction indicators on the floor of Jezero crater, Mars

Wind-abraded rocks and aeolian bedforms have been observed at the Mars 2020 Perseverance landing site, providing evidence for recent and older wind directions. This study reports orientations of aeolian features measured in Perseverance images to infer formative wind directions. It compares these measurements with orbital observations, climate model predictions, and wind data acquired by the Mars

Science

Adjuntas, Puerto Rico

The Adjuntas monitoring station is situated at a relatively high elevation area with steep slopes under thick vegetation. The station is underlain by Tertiary-Cretaceous volcanic rock.
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Adjuntas, Puerto Rico

The Adjuntas monitoring station is situated at a relatively high elevation area with steep slopes under thick vegetation. The station is underlain by Tertiary-Cretaceous volcanic rock.
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Columbia River Gorge Landslides

Extreme rainfall during two atmospheric river events in January 2021 and January 2022 triggered a series of debris flows in the Columbia River Gorge, Oregon. The flows had significant impacts, including multiple highway closures and one fatality. This story map highlights rainfall data and observations of debris flow deposits by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI)...
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Columbia River Gorge Landslides

Extreme rainfall during two atmospheric river events in January 2021 and January 2022 triggered a series of debris flows in the Columbia River Gorge, Oregon. The flows had significant impacts, including multiple highway closures and one fatality. This story map highlights rainfall data and observations of debris flow deposits by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI)...
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Earthquake Geology and Paleoseismology Overview

The goals of USGS earthquake geology and paleoseismology research are 1) to make primary observations and develop ideas to improve our understanding of the geologic expression of active faulting, and 2) to acquire data that will improve the National Seismic Hazard Model. Geological research allows us to characterize faults, including the identification of secondary seismogenic structures, to study...
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Earthquake Geology and Paleoseismology Overview

The goals of USGS earthquake geology and paleoseismology research are 1) to make primary observations and develop ideas to improve our understanding of the geologic expression of active faulting, and 2) to acquire data that will improve the National Seismic Hazard Model. Geological research allows us to characterize faults, including the identification of secondary seismogenic structures, to study...
Learn More