Mission Areas

Natural Hazards

Every year in the United States, natural hazards threaten lives and livelihoods and result in billions of dollars in damage. We work with many partners to monitor, assess, and conduct targeted research on a wide range of natural hazards so that policymakers and the public have the understanding they need to enhance preparedness, response, and resilience.

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Reducing Risk

Reducing Risk

USGS scientists develop new products to make science available to the public, emergency managers, and decision-makers. These efforts increase public safety and reduce risk and economic losses caused by natural hazards.

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Hazard Research

Hazard Research

USGS scientists conduct research to understand earth processes and the natural hazards they can pose to society in order to increase public safety and reduce risk and economic loss.

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News

Date published: April 23, 2019

Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Waves-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System Training

Predicting Coastal Storm Impacts: 4th COAWST Model Training in the James Hunt Library at North Carolina State University, hosted by John Warner, Research Oceanographer of the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center.

Date published: March 25, 2019

USGS Seeks Earthquake Hazards Research Proposals

Applications due May 29, 2019

Date published: March 20, 2019

Five Years Later - The Oso (SR 530) Landslide in Washington

The Oso (SR 530) Landslide in Washington - Five Years Later 

The following is an updated version of a story first published in March of 2015.

Publications

Year Published: 2019

Stratigraphic and structural relations in trench exposures and geomorphology at the Big Burn, Lily Lake, and Lester Ranch sites, Bear River Fault Zone, Utah and Wyoming

This report provides trench photomosaics, logs and related site information, age data, and earthquake event evidence from three paleoseismic trench sites on the Bear River Fault Zone. Our motivation for studying the Bear River Fault Zone—a nascent normal fault in the Rocky Mountains east of the Basin and Range physiographic province—is twofold: (1...

Hecker, Suzanne; Duross, Christopher; Schwartz, David P.; Cinti, Francesca R.; Civico, Riccardo; Lund, William R.; Hiscock, Adam I.; West, Michael W.; Wilcox, Tarka; Stoller, Alivia R.
Hecker, S., DuRoss, C.B., Schwartz, D.P., Cinti, F.R., Civico, R., Lund, W.R., Hiscock, A.I., West, M.W., Wilcox, T., and Stoller, A.R., 2019, Stratigraphic and structural relations in trench exposures and geomorphology at the Big Burn, Lily Lake, and Lester Ranch sites, Bear River Fault Zone, Utah and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3430, 8 p., 3 sheets, https://doi.org/10.3133/sim3430.

Year Published: 2019

Better approaches to managing drought in the American Southwest

The second in a series of USGS Southwest Region (SWR) “Science Exchange” annual workshops, focused on USGS drought science. The participants considered how extreme drought conditions are evolving in much of the American southwest, with an emphasis on integrated drought science planning at the USGS bureau and program levels. The increased need for...

Lambert, Patrick; Titus, Timothy N.; Ostroff, Andrea

Year Published: 2019

The Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake of August 24, 2014—Observations of surface faulting and ground deformation, with recommendations for improving post-earthquake field investigations

The Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake of August 24, 2014, produced complex and extensive surface faulting and other ground deformation features. Following the event, geologists made more than 1,200 field observations at locations where tectonic faulting and ground failure produced visible deformation that fractured and disturbed the ground surface. At...

Ponti, Daniel J.; Rosa, Carla M.; Blair, James Luke
Ponti, D.J, Rosa, C.M, and Blair, J.L., 2019, The Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake of August 24, 2014—Observations of surface faulting and ground deformation, with recommendations for improving post-earthquake field investigations: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019–1018, 50 p., 15 appendixes, https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191018.