Landslide Hazards

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The primary objective of the National Landslide Hazards Program is to reduce long-term losses from landslide hazards by improving our understanding of the causes of ground failure and suggesting mitigation strategies.

Debris-Flow Forecasts Before Wildfires

Debris-Flow Forecasts Before Wildfires

Scientists have been pursuing a way to assess debris flow hazards even before the fire occurs.

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Meeting Announcement

Meeting Announcement

7th International Conference on Debris Flow Hazards Mitigation June 10-13, 2019 in Golden, Colorado

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Looking for something on our new website?

The Landslide Hazards Program website content is now part of a single USGS website, and the URLs have changed. Here is where to find some of our most popular content:

Emergency Assessment of Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazards

Monitoring Stations

Preliminary Landslide Assessments

Science for Everyone

All Research Topics

News

Date published: September 18, 2018

Science for a Risky World: A USGS Plan for Risk Research and Applications – USGS publishes strategic plan for examining risk

USGS explores opportunities to advance its capabilities in risk assessment, mitigation, and communication in new strategic plan.

Date published: September 18, 2018

USGS Science – Leading the Way for Preparedness

Learn About USGS Hazards Science and More About National Preparedness Month: The very nature of natural hazards means that they have the potential to impact a majority of Americans every year.  USGS science provides part of the foundation for emergency preparedness whenever and wherever disaster strikes.

Date published: September 18, 2018

Why Do Giant Rocks Suddenly Fall From Cliffs?

"In Yosemite Valley, rockfalls can happen every four to five days, where boulders that can be larger than your average car or apartment building thunder down steep mountainsides." - Seeker

Publications

Year Published: 2018

Bedrock mapping and seismic hazard assessment at Gold Basin landslide, Washington

The Gold Basin landslide is located along the South Fork Stillaguamish River, within the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in western Washington State. Recent concerns related to slope stability after the 2014 State Route 530 Landslide near Oso, Washington, forced the closure of the U.S. Forest Service Gold Basin Campground in May of 2014. In...

Staisch, Lydia M.
Staisch, L.M., 2018, Bedrock mapping and seismic hazard assessment at Gold Basin landslide, Washington: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1132, 19 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181132.

Year Published: 2018

An updated method for estimating landslide‐event magnitude

Summary statistics derived from the frequency–area distribution (FAD) of inventories of triggered landslides allows for direct comparison of landslides triggered by one event (e.g. earthquake, rainstorm) with another. Such comparisons are vital to understand links between the landslide‐event and the environmental characteristics of the area...

Tanyas, Hakan; Allstadt, Kate E.; van Weston, Cees J.
Tanyas, H., Allstadt, K.E., van Westen, C.J., 2018, An updated method for estimating landslide-event magnitude, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4359

Year Published: 2018

Using stereo satellite imagery to account for ablation, entrainment, and compaction in volume calculations for rock avalanches on Glaciers: Application to the 2016 Lamplugh Rock Avalanche in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

The use of preevent and postevent digital elevation models (DEMs) to estimate the volume of rock avalanches on glaciers is complicated by ablation of ice before and after the rock avalanche, scour of material during rock avalanche emplacement, and postevent ablation and compaction of the rock avalanche deposit. We present a model to account for...

Bessette-Kirton, Erin; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Zhou, Wendy
Bessette-Kirton, E. K., Coe, J. A., & Zhou, W. (2018). Using stereo satellite imagery to account for ablation, entrainment, and compaction in volume calculations for rock avalanches on glaciers: Application to the 2016 Lamplugh rock avalanche in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface,123, 622–641.