Landslide Hazards

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The primary objective of the National Landslide Hazards Program is to reduce long-term losses from landslide hazards by improving our understanding of the causes of ground failure and suggesting mitigation strategies.

Barry Arm, Alaska Landslide and Tsunami Monitoring

Bond Fire Debris Flows, California: January 25 & 28: a geonarrative

Bond Fire Debris Flows, California: January 25 & 28: a geonarrative

A new geonarrative (Esri Story Map) summarizes the debris flows in January 2021 that were caused by a rainstorm following the Bond Fire in California in December of 2020.

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How Often Do Rainstorms Cause Debris Flows in Burned Areas...

How Often Do Rainstorms Cause Debris Flows in Burned Areas...

In the SW U.S., wildfires and intense rainfall are both common occurrences. In burned areas, heavy rain over steep terrain can produce debris flows more so than in unburned areas due to changes in ground surface. How often do these events occur?

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News

Date published: February 17, 2021

How Often Do Rainstorms Cause Debris Flows in Burned Areas of the Southwestern U.S.?

In the SW U.S., wildfires and intense rainfall are both common occurrences. In burned areas, short bursts of heavy rain over steep terrain can produce debris flows more so than in unburned areas due to changes in ground surface. How often do these events tend to occur?

Read the new Science for Everyone article: ...

Date published: February 16, 2021

Bond Fire Debris Flows, California: January 25 and 28, 2021

A new geonarrative (Esri Story Map) summarizes the debris flows that were caused by a rainstorm following the Bond Fire in California.

Date published: January 7, 2021

Post-Wildfire Debris Flow Awareness

Post-wildfire hazards in Colorado can be as dangerous as the fires themselves.

Publications

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Year Published: 2021

Modeling hydrologic processes associated with soil saturation and debris flow initiation during the September 2013 storm, Colorado Front Range

Seven days of extreme rainfall during September 2013 produced more than 1100 debris flows in the Colorado Front Range, about 78% of which occurred on south-facing slopes (SFS). Previously published soil moisture (volumetric water content) observations suggest that SFS were wetter than north-facing slopes (NFS) during the event, which contrasts...

Timilsina, Sujana; Niemann, Jeffrey D.; Rathburn, Sara L.; Rengers, Francis K.; Nelson, Peter A.

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Year Published: 2021

Rapid sensitivity analysis for reducing uncertainty in landslide hazard assessments

One of the challenges in assessing temporal and spatial aspects of landslide hazard using process-based models is estimating model input parameters, especially in areas where limited measurements of soil and rock properties are available. In an effort to simplify and streamline parameter estimation, development of a simple, rapid approach to...

Baum, Rex L.

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Year Published: 2020

Wildfire and landscape change

Wildfire is a worldwide phenomenon that is expected to increase in extent and severity in the future, due to fuel accumulations, shifting land management practices, and climate change. It immediately affects the landscape by removing vegetation, depositing ash, influencing water-repellent soil formation, and physically weathering boulders and...

Santi, Paul M.; Rengers, Francis K.