Landslide Hazards Program

Data and Tools

Emergency Assessment of Post-Fire Debris Flow Hazards

Emergency Assessment of Post-Fire Debris Flow Hazards

Estimates of the probability and volume of debris flows that may be produced by a storm in a recently burned area, using a model with characteristics related to basin shape, burn severity, soil properties, and rainfall.

View

U.S. Landslide Inventory

U.S. Landslide Inventory

A web-based interactive map with a consistent set of landslide data. The searchable map includes contributions from many local, state, and federal agencies and provides links to the original digital inventory files for further information.

View Interactive Map

Earthquake-Triggered Ground-Failure

Earthquake-Triggered Ground-Failure

A web-based interactive map showing earthquake-triggered ground-failure, such as landsliding and liquefaction.

View Interactive Map
Filter Total Items: 34
Date published: January 1, 2017

Results of Hydrologic Monitoring on Landslide-prone Coastal Bluffs near Mukilteo, Washington

A hydrologic monitoring network was installed to investigate landslide hazards affecting the railway corridor along the eastern shore of Puget Sound between Seattle and Everett, near Mukilteo, Washington. During the summer of 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey installed instrumentation at four sites to measure rainfall and air temperature every 15 minutes. Two of the four sites are installed

Date published: January 1, 2017

Results of Hydrologic Monitoring of a Landslide-Prone Hillslope in Portland's West Hills, Oregon, 2006-2017

The West Hills of Portland, in the southern Tualatin Mountains, trend northwest along the west side of Portland, Oregon. These silt-mantled mountains receive significant wet-season precipitation and are prone to sliding during wet conditions, occasionally resulting in significant property damage or casualties. In an effort to develop a baseline for interpretive analysis of the groundwate

Date published: April 27, 2016

Landslide Monitoring

Monitoring is essential to predicting the behavior of landslides and forecasting which storms can trigger landslides. Graphs showing the most recent data are updated regularly with update cycles ranging from 15 minutes to 24 hours. Landslide monitoring data and information provided on this web site are preliminary and have not been reviewed for accuracy; therefore the data are subject to...

Date published: April 1, 2016

Map and model input and output data covering N 40.0° – 40.375° and W 105.25° – 105.625° in the northern Colorado Front Range for analysis of debris flow initiation resulting from the storm of September 9 – 13, 2013

Rainfall on 9–13 September 2013 triggered at least 1,138 debris flows in a 3430 km 2 area of the Colorado Front Range. Most flows were triggered in response to two intense rainfall periods, one 12.5-hour-long period on 11–12 September, and one 8-hour-long period on 12 September. Data in this project pertain to an area bounded by N 40.0° – 40.375&#176...

Date published: April 1, 2016

Map and model input and output data covering N 40.0° – 40.375° and W 105.25° – 105.625° in the northern Colorado Front Range for analysis of debris flow initiation resulting from the storm of September 9 – 13, 2013

Rainfall on 9–13 September 2013 triggered at least 1,138 debris flows in a 3430 km 2 area of the Colorado Front Range. Most flows were triggered in response to two intense rainfall periods, one 12.5-hour-long period on 11–12 September, and one 8-hour-long period on 12 September. Data in this project pertain to an area bounded by N 40.0° – 40.375° and W 105.

Date published: March 4, 2016

Software for Landslide Assessments and Modeling

USGS software for landslide assessments and modeling that include SLAMMER, TRIGRS, PTCOUNT and more.

Date published: February 29, 2016

Map data and Unmanned Aircraft System imagery from the May 25, 2014 West Salt Creek rock avalanche in western Colorado

On May 25, 2014, a rain-on-snow induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek Valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado. The avalanche mobilized from a preexisting rock slide and traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing 3 people. The avalanche was rare for the contiguous U.S. because of its large size (54.5 Mm3) and long travel distance. To underst

Date published: January 1, 2016

Summary Metadata for Inventory of rock avalanches in western Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska

The effects of climate change have the potential to impact slope stability. Negative impacts are expected to be greatest at high northerly latitudes where degradation of permafrost in rock and soil, debuttressing of slopes as a result of glacial retreat, and changes in ocean ice-cover are likely to increase the susceptibility of slopes to landslides. In the United States, the greatest incre...

Date published: January 1, 2016

Laboratory Testing Results: Material strength and hydraulic properties for specimens collected from coastal bluffs near Mukilteo, Washington

This data release includes the detailed results from laboratory testing of colluvium and landslide deposit specimens collected from coastal bluffs near Mukilteo, Washington. The specimens were collected as part of a larger effort to characterize the potential for shallow landslide initiation along the Puget Sound Railway corridor between the cities of Everett and Seattle. The details of the...

Date published: January 1, 2006

Precipitation, Pore-pressure, and Extensometer Measurements from area above the 1997 Woodway landslide, Snohomish County, Washington

On January 15, 1997, a landslide of approximately 100,000-m 3 from a coastal bluff swept five cars of a freight train into Puget Sound at Woodway, Washington, USA, 25 km north of downtown Seattle. The landslide resulted from failure of a sequence of dense sands and hard silts of glacial and non-glacial origin, including hard, jointed clayey silt that rarely fails in natural slopes