Volcano Hazards Program Office

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Date published: October 22, 2020

Volcano Watch — Charcoal, a game changer for understanding processes in young volcanic terraines

One of the fundamental premises of geology is that the "key to understanding the future is to understand the past."  In order to forecast how a volcano will behave, geologists must map the deposits from past eruptions and determine the ages of those deposits. Radiocarbon dating is our principal tool of use.

Date published: October 20, 2020

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – October 20, 2020

Direct gas sampling at Sulphur Banks on September 30, 2020

Date published: October 19, 2020

Trump Administration Officials Tour New Mt. Rainier Lahar Detection Stations

TACOMA, Wash. — Deputy Secretary of the Interior Katharine MacGregor, U.S. Geological Survey Director Jim Reilly, and Counselor to the Secretary Margaret Everson, Exercising the Delegated Authority of the Director of the National Park Service, today visited Mount Rainier National Park to announce the successful permitting and ongoing installation of five new lahar monitoring stations.

Date published: October 19, 2020

Yellowstone's tool-making lava flows

Yellowstone has a lot to offer visitors, from its world-famous hydrothermal features to its vast array of wildlife and breath-taking scenery. Yellowstone has also provided humans with another important resource for the last 11,000 years or more—obsidian.

Date published: October 16, 2020

Media Advisory: Exclusive Interview Opportunities with Interior Officials to Learn about New Mt. Rainier Lahar Detection Stations

TACOMA, Wash. — What is a lahar and why are they a threat to those who live below Mount Rainier? Journalists are invited to learn about the  threat potential posed by lahars from Mount Rainier to local communities and how  new  USGS lahar monitoring stations will integrate into emergency preparedness and response.    

Date published: October 15, 2020

Volcano Watch — Crack team of geologists measure the Koa‘e fault system

The Koa‘e fault system connects Kīlauea’s East and Southwest Rift Zones south of the caldera. Faults here appear as low cliffs, or “scarps” along Hilina Pali Road in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. These fault-cliffs slip during major earthquakes, such as those of May 4, 2018—near the beginning of Kīlauea’s 2018 eruption.

Date published: October 14, 2020

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – October 14, 2020

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake

Date published: October 12, 2020

A time when Old Faithful wasn’t so faithful

Old Faithful Geyser got its unique name in the 19th century because its eruptions were so regular and predictable. But during parts of the 13th and 14th centuries, the geyser did not erupt at all.

Date published: October 9, 2020

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – October 9, 2020

Comparison photos of the floor of Kīlauea caldera

Date published: October 8, 2020

Volcano Watch — Join the Statewide Earthquake Preparedness Drill on 10/15 at 10:15

Major earthquakes cannot be predicted. Successful earthquake predictions need to have three things correct: the location, the time, and the magnitude. The best anyone can reliably do is get two out of three correct. And the most important thing for everyone to do is prepare—have a plan, build a kit, and practice drills. Join us for the ShakeOut on October 15th!

Date published: October 7, 2020

Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – October 7, 2020

Comparison photos of Uēkahuna Bluff