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Food Resources

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Study Provides a Data Resource for Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances in Streams Within Iowa Agricultural Watersheds

Per- and poly fl uoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were detected in streams within agricultural areas (an often-unmeasured landscape) across Iowa. The data from this study provide one resource to understand the extent of PFAS concentrations in water resources from diverse landscapes throughout the United States.
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Study Provides a Data Resource for Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances in Streams Within Iowa Agricultural Watersheds

Per- and poly fl uoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were detected in streams within agricultural areas (an often-unmeasured landscape) across Iowa. The data from this study provide one resource to understand the extent of PFAS concentrations in water resources from diverse landscapes throughout the United States.
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Science to Understand Low-Level Exposures to Neonicotinoid Pesticides, their Metabolites, and Chlorinated Byproducts in Drinking Water

Scientists reported the discovery of three neonicotinoid pesticides in drinking water and their potential for transformation and removal during water treatment. The research provides new insights into the persistence of neonicotinoids and their potential for transformation during water treatment and distribution, while also identifying granulated activated carbon as a potentially effective...
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Science to Understand Low-Level Exposures to Neonicotinoid Pesticides, their Metabolites, and Chlorinated Byproducts in Drinking Water

Scientists reported the discovery of three neonicotinoid pesticides in drinking water and their potential for transformation and removal during water treatment. The research provides new insights into the persistence of neonicotinoids and their potential for transformation during water treatment and distribution, while also identifying granulated activated carbon as a potentially effective...
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Can There be Unintended Benefits when Wastewater Treatment Infrastructure is Upgraded?

Science from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other entities has shown that a mixture of natural and synthetic estrogens and other similar chemicals are discharged from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to streams and rivers.
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Can There be Unintended Benefits when Wastewater Treatment Infrastructure is Upgraded?

Science from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other entities has shown that a mixture of natural and synthetic estrogens and other similar chemicals are discharged from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to streams and rivers.
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Can Spills from Swine Lagoons Result in Downstream Health Hazards?

Livestock manure spills have been shown to result from events such as equipment failures, over-application of manure to agricultural fields, runoff from open feedlots, storage overflow, accidents with manure transporting equipment, and severe weather. Our specialized teams of hydrologists, chemists, biologists and geologists, in collaboration with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health...
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Can Spills from Swine Lagoons Result in Downstream Health Hazards?

Livestock manure spills have been shown to result from events such as equipment failures, over-application of manure to agricultural fields, runoff from open feedlots, storage overflow, accidents with manure transporting equipment, and severe weather. Our specialized teams of hydrologists, chemists, biologists and geologists, in collaboration with Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health...
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Food Resources Lifecycle Integrated Science Team

The team studies the movement of toxicants and pathogens that could originate from the growing, raising, and processing/manufacturing of plant and animal products through the environment where exposure can occur. This information is used to understand if there are adverse effects upon exposure and to develop decision tools to protect health.
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Food Resources Lifecycle Integrated Science Team

The team studies the movement of toxicants and pathogens that could originate from the growing, raising, and processing/manufacturing of plant and animal products through the environment where exposure can occur. This information is used to understand if there are adverse effects upon exposure and to develop decision tools to protect health.
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Algal and Other Environmental Toxins — Lawrence, Kansas

About the Laboratory The Environmental Health Program collaborates with scientists at the Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory (OGRL) in Lawrence, Kansas, to develop and employ targeted and non-targeted analytical methods for identification and quantitation of known and understudied algal/cyanobacterial toxins. The laboratory contructed in 2019 is a 2,500 square foot modern laboratory facility...
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Algal and Other Environmental Toxins — Lawrence, Kansas

About the Laboratory The Environmental Health Program collaborates with scientists at the Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory (OGRL) in Lawrence, Kansas, to develop and employ targeted and non-targeted analytical methods for identification and quantitation of known and understudied algal/cyanobacterial toxins. The laboratory contructed in 2019 is a 2,500 square foot modern laboratory facility...
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High-Content Screening Alternative Toxicity Testing— Columbia, Missouri

About the Research The Environmental Health Program works with toxicologists at the High-Content Screening Laboratory develop alternative toxicity testing to efficiently provide specific toxicity data to managers and regulators and prioritize compounds for further testing. Our high-content imaging capability provides a highly adaptable platform for early life stage fish toxicity testing at stages...
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High-Content Screening Alternative Toxicity Testing— Columbia, Missouri

About the Research The Environmental Health Program works with toxicologists at the High-Content Screening Laboratory develop alternative toxicity testing to efficiently provide specific toxicity data to managers and regulators and prioritize compounds for further testing. Our high-content imaging capability provides a highly adaptable platform for early life stage fish toxicity testing at stages...
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Functional and Molecular Bioassays

About the Research The Functional and Molecular Bioassay Laboratory utilizes reporter assays, quantitative gene expression analyses, and high-throughput sequencing methods to produce functional endpoints across a broad scope of environmental topics and sample matrices.
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Functional and Molecular Bioassays

About the Research The Functional and Molecular Bioassay Laboratory utilizes reporter assays, quantitative gene expression analyses, and high-throughput sequencing methods to produce functional endpoints across a broad scope of environmental topics and sample matrices.
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Environmental Chemistry — Columbia, Missouri

About the Research The Environmental Health Program collaborates with scientists at the Environmental Chemistry Laboratory at the Columbia Environmental Research Center, Missouri, develops and applies innovative methods of sampling and analysis to answer critical questions about the occurrence, distribution, fate and transport, and biological exposure of chemical in all environmental matrices...
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Environmental Chemistry — Columbia, Missouri

About the Research The Environmental Health Program collaborates with scientists at the Environmental Chemistry Laboratory at the Columbia Environmental Research Center, Missouri, develops and applies innovative methods of sampling and analysis to answer critical questions about the occurrence, distribution, fate and transport, and biological exposure of chemical in all environmental matrices...
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Organic Geochemistry Research — Lawrence, Kansas

About the Research The Environmental Health Program collaborates with chemists and geologists at the Kansas Water Science Center's Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory (OGRL) to develop targeted and non-targeted analytical methods for the identification and quantitation of chemicals that can impact the health of humans and other organisms and use bioassays to screen for receptor inhibition...
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Organic Geochemistry Research — Lawrence, Kansas

About the Research The Environmental Health Program collaborates with chemists and geologists at the Kansas Water Science Center's Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory (OGRL) to develop targeted and non-targeted analytical methods for the identification and quantitation of chemicals that can impact the health of humans and other organisms and use bioassays to screen for receptor inhibition...
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Organic Chemistry Research — Sacramento, California

About the Research The Environmental Health Program collaborates with chemists and hydrologists at the Organic Chemistry Research Laboratory (OCRL) to develop targeted analytical methods for the quantitation of chemicals that can impact the health of organisms and humans. The scientists have developed methods in a wide variety of environmental media; in addition to water and sediment, they also...
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Organic Chemistry Research — Sacramento, California

About the Research The Environmental Health Program collaborates with chemists and hydrologists at the Organic Chemistry Research Laboratory (OCRL) to develop targeted analytical methods for the quantitation of chemicals that can impact the health of organisms and humans. The scientists have developed methods in a wide variety of environmental media; in addition to water and sediment, they also...
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Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Science Team

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States and provides critical resources to fish, wildlife and people. For more than a decade, recreational fish species have been plagued with skin lesions and intersex conditions (the presence of male and female sex characteristics in the same fish) that biologists attributed to exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)...
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Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Science Team

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States and provides critical resources to fish, wildlife and people. For more than a decade, recreational fish species have been plagued with skin lesions and intersex conditions (the presence of male and female sex characteristics in the same fish) that biologists attributed to exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)...
Learn More