Regions

Northwest - Pacific Islands

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 72
Mount St. Helens and Mount Rainier, northern aerial view
Date Published: March 2, 2016

Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO)

The CVO staff conduct research on many aspects of active volcanism, respond to dangerous volcanic activity in many parts of the world, and maintain a close watch over volcanoes in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. The USGS established CVO in Vancouver, Washington, after the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens.

USGS
Date Published: March 2, 2016

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)

HVO operates monitoring networks, assesses hazards, and issues notifications of volcanic activity and earthquakes in the State of Hawai‘i. HVO scientists conduct fundamental research on volcanic processes and work to educate the communities at risk. HVO is located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on the Island of Hawaii.

USGS
Date Published: March 2, 2016

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO)

Monitors and studies the active geologic processes and hazards of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and its caldera. Yellowstone National Park contains the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world. YVO also monitors volcanic activity in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico.

USGS science for a changing world logo
Date Published: February 26, 2016

Metapopulation Dynamics of the Adélie Penguin

The Oregon Cooperative Unit, graduate students, and a group of U.S. and international collaborators are conducting long-term research on the Adélie penguin on Ross Island, Antarctica. This species depends on sea ice (obligate) and in some regions of Antarctica is being affected by climate change’s influence on sea ice patterns.

Image: A Rainbow Trout Rests Among Substrate in Panther Creek
Date Published: April 6, 2015
Status: Completed

Panther Creek: Evaluating Recovery of a Mining-Damaged Stream Ecosystem

Historically, Idaho has been home to many productive underground and open-pit mining operations. These activities have also produced water quality problems in some areas. One such example is the Blackbird Mine in central Idaho. Following mining operations from the 1940s through the 1960s, Panther Creek and its tributaries were severely damaged by runoff from the Blackbird Mine. Water-quality...

Alluvium
Date Published: September 10, 2014
Status: Completed

Wood River Valley Hydrogeologic Framework

To make scientifically based water-resource decisions, elected officials, water managers, and the general public need additional information about the Wood River Valley aquifer system. A crucial part of this information is an improved understanding of the extent, thickness, and hydraulic properties of the aquifer—a hydrogeologic framework.

Sample site for water-quality assessment
Date Published: September 9, 2014
Status: Completed

Wood River Valley Aquifer System - Water-Quality Assessment

A component of groundwater availability is whether the water quality is suitable for a particular use. Elected officials, water managers, and the general public have raised concerns about whether water quality has been affected in developed and agricultural areas by wastewater disposal, fertilizer application, and animal waste.

Contacts: Candice Hopkins
Eastern Ada County, Idaho
Date Published: September 9, 2014
Status: Completed

Geochemical Analysis of Groundwater in Eastern Ada County

Groundwater is the primary source of water supply to Ada County’s growing population. Because of a proposed development near Mayfield, the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) initiated the East Ada County Hydrologic Project to improve the scientific understanding of the groundwater resources in the area.

The...

Contacts: Candice Hopkins
U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2012-5119
Date Published: September 9, 2014
Status: Completed

Evaluating Geothermal Groundwater Levels to Support Bruneau Hot Springsnail Recovery

The endangered Bruneau hot springsnail (Pyrgulopsis bruneauensis) exists only in a geographically limited habitat of thermal springs and seeps in southwestern Idaho. As a part of its 2002 recovery plan for the springsnail, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) targeted conservation efforts to increase groundwater levels in the Bruneau area to protect the geothermal spring discharges...

Contacts: Candice Hopkins
Streamgage operated by Idaho Power Company on the Snake River below Swan Falls Dam near Murphy, Idaho
Date Published: January 2, 2014
Status: Completed

Assessing Groundwater/Surface Water Interaction and Stream Discharge Uncertainty in the Snake River

The State of Idaho needs to determine stream discharge, adjusted to remove fluctuations resulting from the operation of hydropower facilities, in the Snake River below Swan Falls Dam near Murphy, Idaho. The State will use this information to distribute water to owners of water rights in the middle Snake River, particularly at thresholds of 3,900 and 5,600 ft3/s.

Water exchange between...

Contacts: David M Evetts
Development along shoreline of Coeur d'Alene Lake
Date Published: January 1, 2014
Status: Completed

Coeur d'Alene Lake Water Budget

Development around Coeur d'Alene Lake has accelerated over the past 25 years. Commercial and residential development adjacent to the lake plus demands for irrigation, recreation, and hydropower raise concerns about the potential for declining lake levels.

A comprehensive lake water budget helps resource managers determine the possible effects of growth on lake levels.

Contacts: Molly A Maupin
Osprey pair nesting on a sign in Coeur d'Alene Lake
Date Published: January 1, 2014
Status: Completed

Coeur d'Alene Lake Water Quality

The mining district in the South Fork Coeur d’Alene River valley was among the Nation’s largest producers of silver, lead, zinc, and other metals from the 1880s to the 1980s. These activities have produced large quantities of waste material that contain environmentally hazardous contaminants such as cadmium, lead, and zinc. Much of this material has been discharged directly to or washed into...

Filter Total Items: 493
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2017

Influence of restored koa in supporting bird communities

Deforestation of Hawaiian forests has adversely impacted native wildlife, including forest birds, bats and arthropods. Restoration activities have included reforestation with the native koa (Acacia koa), a dominant canopy tree species that is easy to propagate, has high survivorship, and has fast growth rates. We review recent research describing...

Camp, Richard J.; Paxton, Eben H.; Yelenik, Stephanie G.
Camp, R. J., E. H. Paxton, and S. G. Yelenik. 2017. Influence of restored koa in supporting bird communities. Pages 56–61 in Acacia koa in Hawai‘i: facing the future. Proceedings of the 2016 Koa Symposium, Hilo, Hawai‘i, 05 October 2016.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2017

Changes in vocal repertoire of the Hawaiian crow, Corvus hawaiiensis,from past wild to current captive populations

For most avian species, social behaviour is critically important for survival and reproductive success. Many social behaviours in birds are culturally transmitted, and as bird populations decline across the globe, important elements of these behaviours may be lost. The Hawaiian crow or 'alalā, Corvus hawaiiensis, is a socially complex avian...

Tanimoto, Ann M.; Hart, Patrick J.; Pack, Adam A.; Switzwer, Richard; Banko, Paul C.; Ball, Donna L.; Sebastian-Gonzalez, Esther; Komarczyk, Lisa; Warrington, Miyako H.
Tanimoto, A. M., P. J. Hart, A. A. Pack, R. Switzer, P. C. Banko, D. L. Ball, E. Sebastián-González, L. Komarczyk, and M. H. Warrington. 2017. Changes in vocal repertoire of the Hawaiian crow, Corvus hawaiiensis, from past wild to current captive populations. Animal Behaviour 123:427-432.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2017

Spatially distributed groundwater recharge for 2010 land cover estimated using a water-budget model for the Island of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i

Owing mainly to projected population growth, demand for freshwater on the Island of Oʻahu is expected to increase by about 26 percent between 2010 and 2030, according to the City and County of Honolulu. Estimates of groundwater recharge are needed to evaluate the availability of fresh groundwater. For this study, a water-budget model with a daily...

Engott, John A.; Johnson, Adam G.; Bassiouni, Maoya; Izuka, Scot K.; Rotzoll, Kolja
Engott, J.A., Johnson, A.G., Bassiouni, Maoya, Izuka, S.K., and Rotzoll, Kolja, 2017, Spatially distributed groundwater recharge for 2010 land cover estimated using a water-budget model for the Island of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i (ver. 2.0, December 2017): U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2015–5010, 49 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20155010.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

A Tour de Force by Hawaii's invasive mammals: establishment, takeover, ecosystem restoration through eradication

Invasive mammals, large and small, have irreversibly altered Hawaii's ecosystems in numerous cases through unnatural herbivory, predation, and the transmission of zoonotic diseases, thereby causing the disproportionate extinction of flora and fauna that occur nowhere else on Earth. The control and eradication of invasive mammals is the single most...

Hess, Steve C.
Hess, S. C. 2016. A Tour de Force by Hawaii's invasive mammals: establishment, takeover, ecosystem restoration through eradication. Pages 361–367 in 27th Vertebrate Pest Conference. University of California, Davis, Newport Beach, California, USA.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

Aging and sexing guide to the forest birds of Hawai‘i Island

We banded birds in Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge from 2012 to 2016, collecting photographs of birds and making detailed observations on coloration, morphology, and molting patterns. While we believe the criteria in this guide are applicable to forest birds across Hawai’i Island, as well as on other Hawaiian islands for ‘Apapane, ‘I‘iwi,...

Paxton, Eben H.; McLaughlin, Rachelle; Levins, Stephanie; VanderWerf, Eric; Lancaster, Nolan
Paxton, E. H., R. McLaughlin, S. Levins, E. A. VanderWerf, and N. Lancaster. 2016. Aging and sexing guide to the forest birds of Hawai‘i Island. Hawai`i Cooperative Studies Unit Technical Report HCSU-TR079, University of Hawai'i at Hilo, Hilo. Available: http://dspace.lib.hawaii.edu/handle/10790/2928

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

Federal collaboration in science for invasive mammal management in U.S. National Parks and Wildlife Refuges of the Pacific Islands

Some of the most isolated islands in the Pacific Ocean are home to US National Parks and Wildlife Refuges. These islands are known for flora and fauna that occur nowhere else, but also for invasive species and other factors which have resulted in the disproportionate extinction of native species. The control of invasive mammals is the single most...

Conner, L.M.; Smith, M.D.; Hess, Steven C.; Hu, Darcy; Loh, Rhonda; Banko, Paul C.
Hess, S. C., D. Hu, R. Loh, P.C. Banko. 2016. Federal collaboration in science for invasive mammal management in U.S. national parks and wildlife refuges of the Pacific Islands. Pages 5–18 in Proceedings of the 16th Wildlife Damage Management Conference, L.M. Conner and M.D. Smith, editors.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

Genetic variation and structure in remnant population of critically endangered Melicope zahlbruckneri

The distribution and amount of genetic variation within and between populations of plant species are important for their adaptability to future habitat changes and also critical for their restoration and overall management. This study was initiated to assess the genetic status of the remnant population of Melicope zahlbruckneri–a critically...

Raji, J. A.; Atkinson, Carter T.
Raji, J.A. and C.T. Atkinson. 2016. Genetic variation and structure in remnant population of critically endangered Melicope zahlbruckneri. Journal of Biodiversity and Endangered Species 4:1–8. Available: https://www.esciencecentral.org/journals/genetic-variation-and-structure-in-remnant-population-of-criticallyendangered-melicope-zahlbruckneri-2332-2543-1000175.php?aid=83908

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

Panel regressions to estimate low-flow response to rainfall variability in ungaged basins

Multicollinearity and omitted-variable bias are major limitations to developing multiple linear regression models to estimate streamflow characteristics in ungaged areas and varying rainfall conditions. Panel regression is used to overcome limitations of traditional regression methods, and obtain reliable model coefficients, in particular to...

Bassiouni, Maoya; Vogel, Richard M.; Archfield, Stacey A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative—A case study in partnership development

The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) is a successful example of collaboration between science and natural resource management at the landscape scale. In southwestern Wyoming, expanding energy and mineral development, urban growth, and other changes in land use over recent decades, combined with landscape-scale drivers such as...

D'Erchia, Frank
D’Erchia, Frank, 2016, Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative—A case study in partnership development: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1423, 17 p., http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/cir1423.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to...

Paxton, Eben H.; Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H.; Leonard, David L.; VanderWerf, Eric
Paxton, E. H., R. J. Camp, P. M. Gorresen, L. H. Crampton, D. L. Leonard Jr., and E. A. VanderWerf. 2016. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island. Science Advances 2:e1600029. URL: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/9/e1600029

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

State-space modeling of population sizes and trends in Nihoa Finch and Millerbird

Both of the 2 passerines endemic to Nihoa Island, Hawai‘i, USA—the Nihoa Millerbird (Acrocephalus familiaris kingi) and Nihoa Finch (Telespiza ultima)—are listed as endangered by federal and state agencies. Their abundances have been estimated by irregularly implemented fixed-width strip-transect sampling from 1967 to 2012, from...

Gorresen, P. Marcos; Brinck, Kevin W.; Camp, Richard J.; Farmer, Chris; Plentovich, Sheldon M.; Banko, Paul C.
Gorresen, P. M., K. W. Brinck, R. J. Camp, C. Farmer, S. M. Plentovich, and P. C. Banko. 2016. State-space modeling of population sizes and trends in Nihoa Finch and Millerbird. Condor 118:542–557.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2016

A tour de force by Hawaii’s invasive mammals: Establishment, takeover, and ecosystem restoration through eradication

Invasive mammals have irreversibly altered ecosystems of Hawai‘i and other tropical Pacific islands in numerous cases through novel herbivory, predation, and diseases, thereby causing the disproportionate extinction of flora and fauna that occur nowhere else on Earth. The control and eradication of invasive mammals is the single most...

Hess, Steve C.
Hess, S. C. 2016. A tour de force by Hawaii’s invasive mammals: establishment, takeover, and ecosystem restoration through eradication. Mammal Study 41:47–60.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 301
July 25, 2016

L1 East Transect – 2016

Permanent Site: L1 East Transect; Depth: 11.4 Meters (37.4 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 2.3 Kilometers (1.4 Miles) west; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 5 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13957527,-123.59359993; Site Description: This transect is medium depth. Substrate is mainly fine sediment/sand/mud covered in a layer of brown diatoms (0:39 seconds). Scattered boulders

...
July 25, 2016

D2 East Transect – 2016

Permanent Site: D2 East Transect; Depth: 11.9 Meters (38.9 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.3 Kilometers (0.2 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 5 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15233001,-123.56829403; Site Description: This site is right off the mouth of the river and is actively being buried in sandy substrate. The sediment for the first 19 meters of the 30 meter

...
Photo of a red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River near Fort Peck Dam, Montana.
June 26, 2016

Red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River in Montana

USGS scientists conducted a dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River about 10 miles downstream of Fort Peck Dam, Montana. The public can expect to see the Yellowstone River turn a similar color in the vicinity of the injection site when scientists conduct a dye study near Glendive, Montana in late June, 2017.

June 15, 2016

Catching the Quakes

USGS Research Geophysicist Kate Allstadt conducts experiments at the U.S. Geological Survey debris-flow flume, near Eugene, Oregon. Dr. Allstadt and her group are working toward an understanding of how debris flows generate seismic signals. The quantitative information will be used in the development of improved technologies for detecting debris flows to mitigate their

...
May 25, 2016

What's the Big Idea?—Multiple Perspectives to Answer Complex Questions

JoAnn Holloway, biogeochemist with the USGS Mineral Resources Program, explains how interdisciplinary science can help better inform the conditions of a complex ecosystem.

A USGS scientist skis in to Dead Horse Point on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier NP.
April 6, 2016

Dead Horse Point

A USGS scientist skis in to Dead Horse Point on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier NP.

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage i
April 5, 2016

Haystack Creek avalanche

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage is one of the largest avalanche paths affecting the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park.  

Old growth forest
March 23, 2016

Old Growth Forest

Old growth forest at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon, old growth forests have bigger trees and a more complex understory.

Hermit warbler
March 23, 2016

Hermit Warbler

Black-throated green warbler at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon.

Black-throated gray warbler
March 23, 2016

Black-throated Gray Warbler

Black-throated gray warbler at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 79
USGS
October 21, 2015

Scientists built upon a recently completed groundwater model of the Yakima River Basin to create a computer simulation that tracks well water back to its likely source area.

Aurora silently illuminates a barren and frozen world of mountains, a schooner locked in sea ice, and a man witha dog-drawn sled
September 30, 2015

USGS explores the meaning behind Frederic Edwin Church's 1865 painting, “Aurora Borealis.”

Image:  Black-footed Albatross with Chick
September 23, 2015

Islands used by tropical seabirds are highly vulnerable to sea level rise according to a new study released today.

Image: Aerial View of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii
September 17, 2015

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have elevated the Volcano Alert Level for Mauna Loa from NORMAL to ADVISORY. This change in status indicates that the volcano is showing signs of unrest that are above known background levels, but it does not mean that a Mauna Loa eruption is imminent or certain.

USGS
September 10, 2015

Tonight, the Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People, will brighten Portland’s skyline when the bridge’s aesthetic nighttime light program is permanently switched on.

USGS
September 9, 2015

Climate change has a direct and evident impact on Native American tribal communities by disrupting local economies and traditional cultures. Members of tribes from across the United States will convene at the University of Idaho’s McCall Field Campus in June 2016 for the first-ever National Tribal Climate Boot Camp.

Image: Seth Moran, USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory
August 17, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey is pleased to announce the selection of Dr. Seth Moran to serve as the new Scientist-in-Charge of the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. Moran succeeds John Ewert, who served in the position for the past five years. Moran took the helm on August 9.

Image: Elevation Field Work at Bandon Marsh
August 14, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey and Oregon State University released a report this week examining Pacific Northwest tidal wetland vulnerability to sea level rise. Scientists found that, while vulnerability varies from marsh to marsh, most wetlands would likely be resilient to rising sea levels over the next 50-70 years.

USGS
July 30, 2015

Twenty middle school girls from Washington and Oregon are participating in “GeoGirls,” an outdoor program jointly organized by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Mount St. Helens Institute.

USGS
July 27, 2015

One winter's night in the year 1700, a mysterious tsunami flooded fields and washed away houses in Japan. It arrived without the warning that a nearby earthquake usually provides.

USGS
May 28, 2015

Ken Berg has been named the new director of the U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, headquartered in Corvallis, Ore.

3D perspective view of the likelihood that each region of California will experience a magnitude 6.7 within 30 years
March 10, 2015

A new California earthquake forecast by the U.S. Geological Survey and partners revises scientific estimates for the chances of having large earthquakes over the next several decades. 

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.