Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Nutrients

Filter Total Items: 11
Date published: April 14, 2020
Status: Active

Nutrient cycling in agricultural watersheds of the Great Lakes

Nutrient Cycling in Aquatic Ecosystems

Nutrients lost from agricultural areas in watersheds of the Great Lakes cause harmful algal blooms and hypoxia in some areas of the Great Lakes. Substantial efforts are being made in these watersheds to...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Nutrient Monitoring: Detroit River Monitoring

The Detroit River is a major contribution of flow to Western Lake Erie. However, difficulty in estimating the phosphorus load from the river has led to uncertainty in the phosphorus budget in Lake Erie. To reduce this uncertainty the USGS, in cooperation with the USEPA through GLRI, have begun depth and width integrated water-quality sampling of the Detroit River. The results of this sampling...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

HABs: Characterizing Zones of High Potential Nutrient Cycling in Agricultural Catchments

River sediments have the capacity to remove nutrients from the water column which lowers the nutrient load to downstream water bodies. The objectives of this project were to characterize rates of sediment nitrogen removal and phosphorus retention in river networks draining agricultural watersheds and to assess how land use and land management actions affect these rates. This information is...

Date published: October 29, 2019
Status: Active

Nutrient Monitoring: Monitoring and Predicting the Impacts of Trees on Urban Stormwater Reduction

The effects of tree removal on the urban hydrologic cycle in order to measure the impact that trees have on stormwater runoff detention volume are being studied in two medium-density residential catchments in Fond du Lac, WI. A paired catchment statistical design and analysis of high-frequency measurements of storm event hydrographs and other monitoring data are being used to quantify...

Date published: April 12, 2019
Status: Active

Edge-of-field monitoring

Edge-of-field monitoring focuses on identifying and reducing agricultural sources of excess nutrients which can threaten the health of streams, rivers, and lakes. Edge-of-field monitoring assesses the quantity and quality of agricultural runoff and evaluates the effectiveness of conservation practices that aim to reduce nutrient loss.

Date published: March 23, 2019
Status: Active

Edge-of-field monitoring: Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative edge-of-field monitoring focuses on identifying and reducing agricultural sources of excess nutrients which threaten the health of the Great Lakes. The USGS supports these efforts by utilizing edge-of-field monitoring to assess the quantity and quality of agricultural runoff and evaluate conservation practices that aim to reduce sediment and nutrient loss....

Date published: November 15, 2017
Status: Active

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

The USGS collaborates with local, state, federal, tribal, university, and industry partners to conduct the science necessary to understand the causes and effects of toxic HABs and inform water management and public health decisions. USGS is characterizing the life cycle of HABs, their asociated toxins, and the genes responsible for cyanotoxin production. This work is enhancing the ability of...

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Nutrient Monitoring Activities

Nutrient pollution is one of America's most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems. Reduction in nutrient inputs to the Great Lakes is a priority under both the Great lakes Restoration Initiative and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. To support these efforts, USGS scientists across the Great Lakes region are monitoring the transport of nutrients at key locations. 

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Agriculture Best Management Practices

One major objective of the GLRI is to reduce nutrient loads from agricultural watersheds by implementing conservation or other nutrient-reduction practices. These efforts focus on reducing phosphorus runoff from fields. USGS scientists are supporting these efforts by providing data and other information to help managers understand the impacts of practices on nutrient runoff. 

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: November 12, 2017
Status: Active

Urban Best Management Practices

Many cities and towns in the Great lakes basin are utilizing urban stormwater best-management practices (BMPs) to reduce the stormwater runoff to local combined sewer systems and ultimately, the Great Lakes. Urban stormwater BMPs can include permeable pavement, bioswales, infiltration basins, and planters. USGS scientists are supporting these efforts by providing data and other information to...

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: September 15, 2016
Status: Completed

Support Of Lake Erie Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP) Activities Through Coordination, Data Collection, Data Dissemination, And Data Interpretation

This project manages USGS Lake Erie LaMP (Lakewide Management Plan) activities. These activities include quarterly conference calls on USGS-related activities; attending semiannual LaMP Workgroup meetings; collection of monitoring metadata from Federal, state, local, and non-governmental organizations for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)...

Contacts: Daniel Button