Unified Interior Regions

Region 2: South Atlantic-Gulf (Includes Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands)

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 364
Date published: April 17, 2016

Peninsular Florida Landscape Conservation Cooperative (PFLCC) Climate Scenarios and Species Vulnerability Assessment

Peninsular Florida is one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change in the United States. With complex socioeconomic and ecology dynamics and a large number of governing agencies involved in conservation planning, USGS worked to created an appropriate framework for landscape conservation cooperative-scale decision-making across current conservation planning agencies and jurisdictions...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Winter Manatee Foraging Behavior and the Decline of Seagrass Beds in the Northern Indian River Lagoon

With high numbers of manatees using the Florida Power and Light power plant warm water refuge during winter, their impact on the seagrass beds in the Indian River Lagoon is considered an important indicator of the long-term capacity of the area to support the manatees. USGS is working with partners to investigate the spatial extent and intensity of manatee use of seagrass beds in the area. ...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Coral Bleaching and Disease: Effects on Threatened Corals and Reefs

A severe disease - tentatively named stony coral tissue loss disease - is rapidly killing corals in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Puerto Rico, and the National Park Service are working together to better under the disease and determine if the disease affecting corals in the USVI is the same one that has been killing corals in Florida...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Mangrove Migration Network

At the poleward marsh-mangrove ecotone, mangrove abundance and coverage is winter temperature-sensitive in that it oscillates in response to the frequency, duration, and/or intensity of extreme winter temperatures. Future winter climate change is expected to facilitate poleward mangrove range expansion at the expense of salt marshes in Texas, Louisiana, and parts of Florida. 

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Watershed Controls of Freshwater Wetland Nutrient Stoichiometry and Sensitivity to Eutrophication

When it comes to freshwater wetlands, hydrology plays a large role in nutrient stoichiometry and sensitivity to nutrient inputs. Although wetland biogeochemists intuitively understand these important relationships between landscape position, hydrology, and sensitivity to nutrient inputs, these relationships have never been quantified using geospatial data. The objective of this project will be...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Incorporating Future Change into Current Conservation Planning: Evaluating Wetland Migration along the Gulf of Mexico under Alternative Sea-Level Rise and Urbanization Scenarios

More than half of contiguous U.S. coastal wetlands are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. These highly-productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services and fish and wildlife habitat. Historically, coastal wetlands have adapted to sea-level changes via lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, coastal wetlands will adapt and migrate...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Macroclimatic Controls of Coastal Wetland Ecosystem Structure and Function

At the global-scale, macroclimatic drivers govern ecosystem structure and function in tidal saline wetlands (e.g., salt marshes, mangrove forests, salt flats). However, global reviews and models for these ecosystems typically do not directly include climatic drivers. The objective of this research is to examine and forecast the effects of macroclimatic drivers on wetland ecosystem structure...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Life History Characterization and Host Fish Identification for Federally Listed and Imperiled Freshwater Mussel Species in the Suwannee River Basin in Georgia and Florida

Freshwater mussels are considered the most imperiled group of animals in the United States. These animals provide valuable ecological services by filtering water, sequestering nutrients, and providing forage for migratory birds, small mammals, and turtles. They also have a unique and complex life cycle that makes them especially vulnerable to human disturbances. It includes a parasitic larval...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluation of Stream Reaches for Mussel Reintroduction in the Upper Coosa Watershed, NW Georgia

The Conasauga River in northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee harbors the majority of mussel diversity still found in the Georgia portion of the Upper Coosa Basin. While the Conasauga historically supported at least 44 mussel species, only about 20 species remain. 

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Geographical Trends in Ecosystem Function and Biodiversity of Wetlands as a Surrogate for Climate Change

Extreme drought and temperature in the southeastern United States may become more frequent in the future, and any  extreme shifts in climate condition are likely to have effects on wetland ecosystem function. USGS research predicts the effects of climate change by shifts in function and biodiversity across existing  climate gradients in baldcypress swamps. 

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Alabama Barrier Island Restoration Assessment at Dauphin Island

Dauphin Island, Alabama, is the only barrier island providing protection to much of Alabama's coastal natural resources. Severely impacted by repeated extreme events, like Hurricane Katrina and Deepwater Horizon oil spill, USGS and partners are conducting a joint study to evaluate the feasibility of certain alternatives to increase resiliency and sustainability of the island. 

Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

GIS and Custom Application Support for the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council

The scientists at the Wetland and Aquatic Science Center (WARC) have provided coastal restoration project managers and decision makers with GIS planning, database and custom application capacity since 1992. The scope and complexity of this support has increased over the years and has resulted in the development of a comprehensive geospatial and advanced application teams that provide decision...

Filter Total Items: 5,299
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Year Published: 2020

Modeling soil porewater salinity response to drought in tidal freshwater forested wetlands

There is a growing concern about the adverse effects of saltwater intrusion via tidal rivers, streams and creeks into tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) due to sea‐level rise (SLR) and intense and extended drought events. However, the magnitude and duration of porewater salinity in exceedance of plant salinity stress threshold (2 practical...

Wang, Hongqing; Krauss, Ken W.; Noe, Gregory B.; Stagg, Camille L.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Duberstein, Jamie A.; Conner, William H.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

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Year Published: 2020

Final project memorandum: Identifying conservation objectives for the Gulf Coast habitats of the black skimmer and gull-billed tern

Many shorebirds and nearshore waterbirds are of conservation concern across the Gulf of Mexico due to stressors such as human disturbance, predation, and habitat loss and degradation. Conservation and protection of these birds is important for the functioning of healthy ecosystems and for maintaining biodiversity in North America. Consequently,...

Cronin, James P.

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Year Published: 2020

Expert bioblitzes facilitate non-native fish tracking and interagency partnerships

Documenting the distribution and composition of non-native species populations can be challenging, especially when species cross jurisdictional boundaries that require interagency coordination. Herein I report the development of three tools that have been used in Florida over the past seven years to assist with tracking of non-native fishes: 1) an...

Schofield, Pamela J.

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Year Published: 2020

Throughfall reduction x fertilization: Deep soil water usage in a clay rich ultisol under loblolly pine in the Southeast USA

Forests in the Southeast USA are predicted to experience a moderate decrease in precipitation inputs over this century that may result in soil water deficiency during the growing season. The potential impact of a drier climate on the productivity of managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations in the Southeast USA is uncertain. Access to...

Qi, Jiaguo; Markewitz, Daniel M.; McGuire, Mary Ann; Samuelson, Lisa; Ward, Eric

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Year Published: 2020

Multi-region assessment of pharmaceutical exposures and predicted effects in USA wadeable urban-gradient streams

Human-use pharmaceuticals in urban streams link aquatic-ecosystem health to human health. Pharmaceutical mixtures have been widely reported in larger streams due to historical emphasis on wastewater-treatment plant (WWTP) sources, with limited investigation of pharmaceutical exposures and potential effects in smaller headwater streams. In 2014–...

Bradley, Paul; Journey, Celeste A.; Button, Daniel T.; Carlisle, Daren; Huffman, B. J.; Qi, Sharon L.; Romanok, Kristin; Van Metre, Peter C.

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Year Published: 2020

Identification of Acara (Cichlidae: Cichlasoma) established in Florida, USA

The Black Acara, Cichlasoma bimaculatum (Linnaeus, 1758), was first reported as introduced to Florida in 1965. Native to Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, western French Guiana, and northern Brazil, the species is now distributed throughout Florida’s southern peninsula. Examination of live and preserved acara from Central Florida, heretofore...

Robins, Robert H; Brown, Mary E.; Crutchfield, Ryan A

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Year Published: 2020

Field observations of wind waves in Upper Delaware Bay with living shorelines

Constructed oyster reefs (CORs) provide shore protections and habitats for fish and shellfish communities via wave energy attenuation. However, the processes and mechanism of CORs on wave attenuation remain unclear, thus limiting the effective assessment of CORs for shoreline protection. This paper presents results of a field investigation on wave...

Zhu, Ling; Chen, Qin; Wang, Hongqing; Capurso, William D.; Niemoczynski, Lukasz; Hu, Kelin; Snedden, Gregg

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Year Published: 2020

Rapid peat development beneath created, maturing mangrove forests: Ecosystem changes across a 25-year chronosequence

Mangrove forests are among the world’s most productive and carbon‐rich ecosystems. Despite growing understanding of factors controlling mangrove forest soil carbon stocks, there is a need to advance understanding of the speed of peat development beneath maturing mangrove forests— especially in created and restored mangrove forests that are...

Osland, Michael J.; Feher, Laura C.; Spivak, Amanda C.; Nestlerode, Janet A.; Almario, Alejandro E.; Cormier, Nicole; From, Andrew; Krauss, Ken W.; Russell, Marc J.; Alvarez, Federico; Dantin, Darrin D.; Harvey, James E.; Stagg, Camille L.

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Year Published: 2020

Forecasting future beach width-A case study along the Florida Atlantic coast

Historical cross-shore positions of the shoreline and dune base were used as inputs for a Kalman filter algorithm to forecast the positions of these features in the year 2028. The beach width was also computed as the cross-shore distance between the forecasted 2028 shoreline and dune-base positions. While it does not evaluate the suitability of a...

Long, Joseph W.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Thompson, David M.
Long, J.W., Henderson, R.E., and Thompson, D.M., 2020, Forecasting future beach width—A case study along the Florida Atlantic coast: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019–1150, 13 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191150.

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Year Published: 2020

Herpetofauna occupancy and community composition along a tidal swamp salinity gradient

Occupancy patterns of herpetofauna in most tidal freshwater swamps are unknown. Tidal freshwater swamps currently face multiple threats, including salinization, which can influence their associated plant and animal communities. The impacts of salinization to herpetofauna communities in tidal freshwater swamps have not been assessed. To improve...

Godfrey, Sidney T; Waddle, J. Hardin; Baldwin, Robert F; Conner, William H.; Bridges, William C; Duberstein, Jamie A.

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Year Published: 2020

Soil shear strength losses in two fresh marshes with variable increases in N and P loading

We measured soil shear strength (SSS) from 2009 to 2018 in two hydrologically distinct freshwater marshes dominated by Panicum hemitomon after nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) were applied to the surface in spring. The average SSS averaged over 100 cm depth in the floating and anchored marshes declined up to 30% throughout the profiles and with no...

Turner, R. Eugene; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Bodker, James E.

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Year Published: 2020

Final Alabama Barrier Island restoration assessment report, appendix A: Data management plan

The Alabama Barrier Island Restoration Assessment project focused exclusively on Dauphin Island, a significant barrier island along the northern Gulf of Mexico. This restoration feasibility study effort required data collection and analysis of many data types (e.g., hydro, sediment, currents, etc.) through the project’s life cycle to assess...

Hunnicutt, Christina B.; Conzelmann, Craig

Filter Total Items: 497
Photo of bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

...
Photo of bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

...
Photo of bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii

Bleaching colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

...
Photo of bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea

Bleaching colony of massive starlet coral, Siderastrea siderea, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

...
Photo of bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa

Bleaching colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa, Florida Keys. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so when

...
Photo of bleaching colony of blushing star coral, Stephanocoenia intersepta/michelinii.
August 17, 2010

Bleaching colony of blushing star coral, Stephanocoenia intersepta

Bleaching colony of blushing star coral, Stephanocoenia intersepta/michelinii. When corals are stressed, the symbiosis between the coral animal and its photosynthetic algal symbionts (zooxanthellae) breaks down and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the coral tissue. The zooxanthellae’s photosynthetic pigments contribute much of the color we see in corals, so

...
colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa, affected by black-band disease
August 12, 2010

Brain coral with black-band disease

A colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

Star coral, Montastraea faveolata, affected by black-band disease
August 8, 2010

Star coral, Montastraea faveolata, affected by black-band disease

A colony of mountainous star coral, Montastraea faveolata, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

Colony brain coral, Diploria clivosa, affected by black-band disease
August 7, 2010

Colony brain coral, Diploria clivosa, affected by black-band disease

A colony of knobby brain coral, Diploria clivosa, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

Close-up of the interface between bleached polyps of the great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, and black-band disease
August 7, 2010

Star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, and black-band disease

Close-up of the interface between bleached polyps of the great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, and black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys. The dead coral skeleton behind the black band has become overgrown with green algae.

 

Filter Total Items: 397
USGS science for a changing world logo
August 2, 2005

U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologists in Gainesville, Fla., have confirmed the presence of the voracious non-native northern snakehead fish in Meadow Lake in Queens, N.Y. Five specimens have been collected by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation from the lake in Flushing Meadows Corona Park since early July.

USGS
August 1, 2005

In its latest report on water use in the United States, the USGS looked at the nation's dependence on ground water. The report entitled Estimated Withdrawals from Principal Aquifers in the United States, 2000, provides details of ground-water withdrawals and use from principal aquifers in each state.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 27, 2005

A team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is tracking and collecting samples from a large African dust cloud that originated in the Sahara Desert and is moving over parts of Florida and the Caribbean.

USGS
July 27, 2005

A team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is tracking and collecting samples from a large African dust cloud that originated in the Sahara Desert and is moving over parts of Florida and the Caribbean.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 9, 2005

With the approach of Hurricane Dennis, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are looking at the section of beach most likely to take the brunt of the storm’s fury. 

USGS
June 3, 2005

The American Ground Water Trust’s program "Ground Water Institute for Teachers TM", educates teachers about ground water and hydrology.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 23, 2004

A team of scientists has determined that a coral reef discovered in 1999 is the deepest reef ever found off the continental U.S., the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announced today. The reef lies in approximately 250 feet of water off the coast of southwest Florida on a submerged barrier-island named Pulley Ridge.

USGS
December 23, 2004

A team of scientists has determined that a coral reef discovered in 1999 is the deepest reef ever found off the continental U.S., the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announced today.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 6, 2004

USGS Director Chip Groat is available for interviews on Dec. 6-7. Please call the contact, above. Groat will present Science for Ecosystem Restoration on Mon, Dec. 6 from 2:20-2:50pm.

USGS
December 6, 2004

Hydrologists, biologists, geologists and geographers from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) will discuss their science at the First National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER) Dec. 6-10 at the Wyndham Palace in Orlando, Fla.

Follow Region 2 activities on social media, get contact information for Region 2 USGS centers, and meet Region 2's staff and center directors.