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Dakota Water Science Center

Our Dakota Water Science Center priority is to continue the important work of the Department of the Interior and the USGS, while also maintaining the health and safety of our employees and community.  Based on guidance from the White House, the CDC, and state and local authorities, we are shifting our operations to a virtual mode and have minimal staffing in offices.

News

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Bakken Shale unconventional oil and gas production has not caused widespread hydrocarbon contamination to date in groundwater used for water supply

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USGS Responds to Spring Flooding

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Public Invitation: Learn the Latest on Your Water Resources in the Dakotas

Publications

Measurements of streamflow gain and loss on the Souris River between Lake Darling and Verendrye, North Dakota, August 31 and September 1, 2021

Dry conditions during 2020 and 2021 affected the water supply within the Souris River Basin and highlighted the need for better understanding of the streamflow dynamics for managing the resource during low-flow conditions. In June 2021, a loss of streamflow was observed on the Souris River between U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on the Souris River near Foxholm, North Dakota (site 1), and near

Historical and paleoflood analyses for probabilistic flood-hazard assessments—Approaches and review guidelines

Paleoflood studies are an effective means of providing specific information on the recurrence and magnitude of rare and large floods. Such information can be combined with systematic flood measurements to better assess the frequency of large floods. Paleoflood data also provide valuable information about the linkages among climate, land use, flood-hazard assessments, and channel morphology. This d

Climate extremes as drivers of surface-water-quality trends in the United States

Surface-water quality can change in response to climate perturbations, such as changes in the frequency of heavy precipitation or droughts, through direct effects, such as dilution and concentration, and through physical processes, such as bank scour. Water quality might also change through indirect mechanisms, such as changing water demand or changes in runoff interaction with organic matter on t

Science

Flood-Frequency Analysis in the Midwest: Addressing Potential Nonstationary Annual Peak-Flow Records

Period of Project: 2021 -Study Area: MidwestCooperating Agency: Transportation Pooled Fund
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Flood-Frequency Analysis in the Midwest: Addressing Potential Nonstationary Annual Peak-Flow Records

Period of Project: 2021 -Study Area: MidwestCooperating Agency: Transportation Pooled Fund
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Souris River Basin

Information and products on the Souris River Basin.
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Souris River Basin

Information and products on the Souris River Basin.
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Devils Lake Basin

Information and products on the Devils Lake Basin.
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Devils Lake Basin

Information and products on the Devils Lake Basin.
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