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New Mexico Water Science Center

New Mexico Water Science Center's priority is to continue the important work of the Department of the Interior and the USGS, while also maintaining the health and safety of our employees and community. Based on guidance from the White House, the CDC, and state and local authorities, we are shifting our operations to a virtual mode and have minimal staffing within our offices.

News

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Future Peak Flow Along Rio Grande May Arrive Early Due to Climate Change

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Pesticides and their degradation products common in groundwater but at low concentrations unlikely to be human-health concern

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USGS Unveils Mobile Flood Tool for the Nation

Publications

Suspended-sediment transport and water management, Jemez Canyon Dam, New Mexico, 1948–2018

Construction and operation of dams provide sources of clean drinking water, support large-scale irrigation, generate hydroelectricity, control floods, and improve river navigation. Yet these benefits are not without cost. Dams affect the natural flow regime, downstream sediment fluxes, and riverine and riparian ecosystems. The Jemez Canyon Dam in New Mexico was constructed in 1953 by the U.S. Army

Quality of groundwater used for public supply in the continental United States: A comprehensive assessment

The presence of contaminants in a source water can constrain its suitability for drinking. The quality of groundwater used for public supply was assessed in 25 principal aquifers (PAs) that account for 84% of groundwater pumped for public supply in the U.S. (89.6 million people on a proportional basis). Each PA was sampled across its lateral extent using an equal-area grid, typically with 60 wells

Postfire debris flow hazards—Tips to keep you safe

Often referred to as “mudflows,” debris flows are a type of landslide made up of a rapidly moving mixture of dirt, rocks, trees, and water (and sometimes ash) that start on a hillside and travel downvalley. They can easily overflow channels and severely damage houses, vehicles, or other structures. Areas burned by wildfires are especially susceptible to these hazards, which can be triggered by sto

Science

Actionable Science

The Colorado River Basin Pilot Project is exploring new approaches for the USGS to answer complex earth systems questions identified in partnership with stakeholders, which cannot be answered through a single discipline approach. Science coproduction is a method where scientists, managers, policy makers, and other stakeholders first identify specific decisions to be informed by science, and then...
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Actionable Science

The Colorado River Basin Pilot Project is exploring new approaches for the USGS to answer complex earth systems questions identified in partnership with stakeholders, which cannot be answered through a single discipline approach. Science coproduction is a method where scientists, managers, policy makers, and other stakeholders first identify specific decisions to be informed by science, and then...
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Integrated Science Approach

The USGS has a long history of delivering science and tools to help decision-makers manage and mitigate effects of drought. The timing is critical for the USGS to consolidate its diverse expertise into a single landscape-scale effort to rapidly provide integrated transdisciplinary, targeted data, tools, and models required by decision makers in the Basin. This initiative unifies USGS expertise...
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Integrated Science Approach

The USGS has a long history of delivering science and tools to help decision-makers manage and mitigate effects of drought. The timing is critical for the USGS to consolidate its diverse expertise into a single landscape-scale effort to rapidly provide integrated transdisciplinary, targeted data, tools, and models required by decision makers in the Basin. This initiative unifies USGS expertise...
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Streamflow response to potential changes in climate in the Upper Rio Grande Basin

The Rio Grande is a vital water source for Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and northern Mexico. A model was developed to determine how Rio Grande streamflow could change in the future. Both streamflow timing and volume displayed substantial potential changes. However, streamflow timing was most affected, and runoff could arrive a month earlier than the historic average if temperatures continue to warm...
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Streamflow response to potential changes in climate in the Upper Rio Grande Basin

The Rio Grande is a vital water source for Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and northern Mexico. A model was developed to determine how Rio Grande streamflow could change in the future. Both streamflow timing and volume displayed substantial potential changes. However, streamflow timing was most affected, and runoff could arrive a month earlier than the historic average if temperatures continue to warm...
Learn More