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New Mexico Water Science Center

New Mexico Water Science Center's priority is to continue the important work of the Department of the Interior and the USGS, while also maintaining the health and safety of our employees and community. Based on guidance from the White House, the CDC, and state and local authorities, we are shifting our operations to a virtual mode and have minimal staffing within our offices.

News

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Future Peak Flow Along Rio Grande May Arrive Early Due to Climate Change

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Pesticides and their degradation products common in groundwater but at low concentrations unlikely to be human-health concern

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USGS Unveils Mobile Flood Tool for the Nation

Publications

Composite regional groundwater hydrographs for selected principal aquifers in New Mexico, 1980–2019

Groundwater is an important source of water for New Mexico. An estimated 48 percent of the total water used comes from groundwater sources, and groundwater levels generally are declining over large areas of New Mexico. Groundwater levels are affected by local and regional recharge or discharge processes. Groundwater hydrographs show the history of groundwater-level changes at a well. A single hydr

Volatile organic compounds in groundwater used for public supply across the United States: Occurrence, explanatory factors, and human-health context

This systematic assessment of occurrence for 85 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in raw (untreated) groundwater used for public supply across the United States (U.S.), which includes 43 compounds not previously monitored by national studies, relates VOC occurrence to explanatory factors and assesses VOC detections in a human-health context. Samples were collected in 2013 through 2019 from 1537 pu

Rocky Mountain Region Science Exchange 2020—EarthMAP and the Colorado River Basin

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) hosted USGS scientists, managers, program coordinators, and leadership team members for a virtual Science Exchange during September 15–17, 2020. The Science Exchange had 216 registered participants and included 48 talks over the 3-day period. Invited speakers presented information about the novel USGS Earth Monitoring, Analysis, and Pre

Science

Streamflow response to potential changes in climate in the Upper Rio Grande Basin

The Rio Grande is a vital water source for Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and northern Mexico. A model was developed to determine how Rio Grande streamflow could change in the future. Both streamflow timing and volume displayed substantial potential changes. However, streamflow timing was most affected, and runoff could arrive a month earlier than the historic average if temperatures continue to warm...
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Streamflow response to potential changes in climate in the Upper Rio Grande Basin

The Rio Grande is a vital water source for Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and northern Mexico. A model was developed to determine how Rio Grande streamflow could change in the future. Both streamflow timing and volume displayed substantial potential changes. However, streamflow timing was most affected, and runoff could arrive a month earlier than the historic average if temperatures continue to warm...
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Investigations of Sources of Contaminants of Concern in the San Juan River

Metals attached to suspended sediments or dissolved in river water pose a potential health risk to communities that depend on that water for agricultural and domestic uses. Exceedances of Navajo Nation surface water quality standards for metals (especially lead and arsenic) indicate that communities on the Navajo Nation along the San Juan River are exposed to this potential risk. Sources for these...
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Investigations of Sources of Contaminants of Concern in the San Juan River

Metals attached to suspended sediments or dissolved in river water pose a potential health risk to communities that depend on that water for agricultural and domestic uses. Exceedances of Navajo Nation surface water quality standards for metals (especially lead and arsenic) indicate that communities on the Navajo Nation along the San Juan River are exposed to this potential risk. Sources for these...
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Pilot Project Team Members | CRB-ASIST

The Rocky Mountain Region is working with a multidisciplinary team of experts within the Colorado River Basin to determine how the USGS can develop integrative science, data, models, and tools that can be used to address key science challenges related to drought risk within the basin.
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Pilot Project Team Members | CRB-ASIST

The Rocky Mountain Region is working with a multidisciplinary team of experts within the Colorado River Basin to determine how the USGS can develop integrative science, data, models, and tools that can be used to address key science challenges related to drought risk within the basin.
Learn More