Geologic Hazards Science Center

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The Geologic Hazards Science Center (GHSC), on the Colorado School of Mines campus, is home to the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC), many scientists in the Earthquake Hazards Program and Landslide Hazards Program, as well as the Geomagnetism Program staff.

Earthquake Hazards Program

Earthquake Hazards Program

The Earthquake Hazards Program provides research and information products for earthquake loss reduction, including hazard and risk assessments, comprehensive real-time earthquake monitoring, and public outreach.

Earthquake Hazards

Landslide Hazards Program

Landslide Hazards Program

The National Landslide Hazards Program strives to reduce long-term losses from landslide hazards by improving our understanding of the causes of ground failure and suggesting mitigation strategies.

Landslide Hazards

Geomagnetism Program

Geomagnetism Program

The Geomagnetism Program provides continuous records of magnetic field variations; disseminates magnetic data; and conducts research into the nature of geomagnetic variations for purposes of scientific understanding and hazard mitigation.

Geomagnetism

News

Date published: October 25, 2019

Deep Landslides Not Reactivated by 2018 Anchorage Quake (SSA News)

"Major landslides triggered by the 1964 magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska earthquake responded to, but were not reactivated by, the magnitude 7.1 Anchorage earthquake that took place  30 November 2018, researchers concluded in a new study published in Seismological Research Letters."

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Date published: October 17, 2019

What if the ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning System Had Been Operating During the M6.9 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake?

How will ShakeAlert® likely perform now on a large earthquake impacting a major urban area? How much warning will you get? To answer this, let’s do a thought experiment...

Read the new Science for Everyone article at What if the ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning System...

Date published: October 16, 2019

The 2019 Great ShakeOut

When the ground starts to shake, what do you do?  Great ShakeOut 2019:  Drop, Cover, and Hold On!

Publications

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Year Published: 2019

Status of three-dimensional geological mapping and modeling activities in the U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), created in 1879, is the national geological survey for the United States and the sole science agency within its cabinet-level bureau, the Department of the Interior. The USGS has a broad mission, including: serving the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth;...

Sweetkind, Donald; Graymer, Russell; Higley, D.K.; Boyd, Oliver S.

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Year Published: 2019

Characterizing large earthquakes before rupture is complete

Whether large and very large earthquakes are distinguishable from each other early on in the rupture process has been a subject often debated over the past several decades. Studies have shown that the frequency content of radiated seismic energy in the first few seconds of an earthquake scales with the final magnitude of the event, implying...

Melgar, Diego; Hayes, Gavin P.

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Year Published: 2019

Global earthquake response with imaging geodesy: recent examples from the USGS NEIC

The U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center leads real-time efforts to provide rapid and accurate assessments of the impacts of global earthquakes, including estimates of ground shaking, ground failure, and the resulting human impacts. These efforts primarily rely on analysis of the seismic wavefield to characterize the...

Barnhart, William D.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Wald, David J.