New England Water Science Center

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Welcome to the USGS New England Water Science Center. We provide timely and reliable information to Federal, State, Tribal, and local stakeholders on the water resources of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Our data help safeguard human and wildlife health, public safety, and environmental sustainability. 

For assistance, please contact us through our Connect page.

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Selected Projects

Selected Projects

Explore New England WSC science projects.

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Remembering Irene

Remembering Irene

Tropical Storm Irene made landfall in New England on August 28, 2011, bringing high winds and record setting rainfall. Ten years later, our Center remembers the historical significance of the storm and the USGS response.

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News

September 29, 2021

WaterMarks Newsletter - Fall 2021

In this issue we announce new members of our team and our new Associate Director selections. We're excited to welcome these folks and about the great science they will produce for the region. We also recognize a decade since Tropical Storm Irene and the toll it took on portions of New England. Please explore the Irene geonarrative and recent publications. Hope you all have a very happy Fall! 

Date published: September 24, 2021

Science in Support of Aquatic-Ecosystem Conservation and Restoration

Human land- and water-management practices have resulted in modifications to natural streamflow conditions and reduced the ecological health of aquatic communities. Working in collaboration with our many partners, the New England Water Science Center provides data and scientific analyses to inform and support aquatic-ecosystem conservation and restoration.

Date published: September 23, 2021

Meet our New Staff at New England WSC - September 2021

Join us in welcoming our recently hired staff at the New England WSC.

Publications

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Year Published: 2022

Populations using public-supply groundwater in the conterminous U.S. 2010; Identifying the wells, hydrogeologic regions, and hydrogeologic mapping units

Most Americans receive their drinking water from publicly supplied sources, a large portion of it from groundwater. Mapping these populations consistently and at a high resolution is important for understanding where the resource is used and needs to be protected. The results show that 269 million people are supplied by public supply, 107 million...

Johnson, Tyler D.; Belitz, Kenneth; Kauffman, Leon J.; Watson, Elise; Wilson, John T.

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Year Published: 2021

Simulating the effects of climate-related changes to air temperature and precipitation on streamflow and water temperature in the Meduxnekeag River watershed, Maine

Responsible stewardship of native fish populations and riparian plants in the Meduxnekeag River watershed in northeastern Maine is a high priority for the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians. Understanding the potential changes in hydrology and water temperature as a result of climate change is important to this priority for evaluating future habitat...

Bjerklie, David M.; Olson, Scott A.
Bjerklie, D.M., and Olson, S.A., 2021, Simulating the effects of climate-related changes to air temperature and precipitation on streamflow and water temperature in the Meduxnekeag River watershed, Maine: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5104, 35 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215104.

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Year Published: 2021

Simulation of groundwater budgets and travel times for watersheds on the north shore of Long Island Sound, with implications for nitrogen-transport studies

Aquatic systems in and around the Long Island Sound (LIS) provide a variety of ecological and economic benefits, but in some areas of the LIS, aquatic ecosystems have become degraded by excess nitrogen. A substantial fraction of the nitrogen inputs to the LIS are transported through the groundwater-flow system. Because groundwater travel times in...

Barclay, Janet R.; Mullaney, John R.
Barclay, J.R., and Mullaney, J.R., 2021, Simulation of groundwater budgets and travel times for watersheds on the north shore of Long Island Sound, with implications for nitrogen-transport studies: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5116, 84 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215116.