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New England Water Science Center

Welcome to the USGS New England Water Science Center. We provide timely and reliable information to Federal, State, Tribal, and local stakeholders on the water resources of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Our data help safeguard human and wildlife health, public safety, and environmental sustainability.

For assistance, contact us on our Connect page.

News

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WaterMarks Newsletter - Winter 2023

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New England WSC Products in the Fourth Quarter of 2023

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USGS is determining extent of flooding in Maine caused by large coastal storm worsened by snowmelt

Publications

Estimating lithium concentrations in groundwater used as drinking water for the conterminous United States

Lithium (Li) concentrations in drinking-water supplies are not regulated in the United States; however, Li is included in the 2022 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency list of unregulated contaminants for monitoring by public water systems. Li is used pharmaceutically to treat bipolar disorder, and studies have linked its occurrence in drinking water to human-health outcomes. An extreme gradient b
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Melissa Lombard, Eric E. Brown, Daniel Saftner, Monica M. Arienzo, Esme Fuller-Thomson, Craig J. Brown, Joseph D. Ayotte

Train, inform, borrow, or combine? Approaches to process-guided deep learning for groundwater-influenced stream temperature prediction

Although groundwater discharge is a critical stream temperature control process, it is not explicitly represented in many stream temperature models, an omission that may reduce predictive accuracy, hinder management of aquatic habitat, and decrease user confidence. We assessed the performance of a previously-described process-guided deep learning model of stream temperature in the Delaware River B
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Janet R. Barclay, Simon Nemer Topp, Lauren Elizabeth Koenig, Margaux Jeanne Sleckman, Alison P. Appling

Highway-runoff quality from segments of open-graded friction course and dense-graded hot-mix asphalt pavement on Interstate 95, Massachusetts, 2018–21

Highway runoff is a source of sediment and associated constituents to downstream waterbodies that can be managed with the use of stormwater-control measures that reduce sediment loads. The use of open-graded friction course (OGFC) pavement has been identified as a method to reduce loads from highway runoff because it retains sediment in pavement voids; however, few datasets are available in New En

Authors
Kirk P. Smith, Alana B. Spaetzel, Phillip A. Woodford

Science

New England Tribal Engagement

The USGS New England Water Science Center (WSC) is proud to provide science support to Tribal Nations as part of our Federal Trust Responsibility to honor the government-to-government relationships that the United States has with 574 Federally-recognized Tribes. Tribal Nations have ancestral ties with the environment. Natural resources are inextricably connected to sustenance, traditional...
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New England Tribal Engagement

The USGS New England Water Science Center (WSC) is proud to provide science support to Tribal Nations as part of our Federal Trust Responsibility to honor the government-to-government relationships that the United States has with 574 Federally-recognized Tribes. Tribal Nations have ancestral ties with the environment. Natural resources are inextricably connected to sustenance, traditional...
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Investigating Associations Between Socioeconomic Data and Populations Vulnerable to Private Well-Water Concerns in New Hampshire

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is investigating the presence of statistical associations between socioeconomic data (or proxy data) and the susceptibility of private wells to water quality or quantity concerns in New Hampshire.
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Investigating Associations Between Socioeconomic Data and Populations Vulnerable to Private Well-Water Concerns in New Hampshire

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is investigating the presence of statistical associations between socioeconomic data (or proxy data) and the susceptibility of private wells to water quality or quantity concerns in New Hampshire.
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Water Cycle Center

The Water Cycle Center is a cooperation between U.S. Geological Survey and academic partners in the Northeast that studies complete water cycles and watersheds, from mountaintops to shorelines, concentrating on freshwater ecosystems. This research advances the understanding of processes that determine water availability and is needed to best address future water resource challenges.
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Water Cycle Center

The Water Cycle Center is a cooperation between U.S. Geological Survey and academic partners in the Northeast that studies complete water cycles and watersheds, from mountaintops to shorelines, concentrating on freshwater ecosystems. This research advances the understanding of processes that determine water availability and is needed to best address future water resource challenges.
Learn More