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New England Water Science Center

Welcome to the USGS New England Water Science Center. We provide timely and reliable information to Federal, State, Tribal, and local stakeholders on the water resources of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Our data help safeguard human and wildlife health, public safety, and environmental sustainability.

For assistance, contact us on our Connect page.

News

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Remembering Hurricane Sandy Ten Years Later

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WaterMarks Newsletter - Fall 2022

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Meet our New Staff at the New England WSC - September 2022

Publications

Predicted uranium and radon concentrations in New Hampshire (USA) groundwater—Using Multi Order Hydrologic Position as predictors

Two radioactive elements, uranium (U) and radon (Rn), which are of potential concern in New Hampshire (NH) groundwater, are investigated. Exceedance probability maps are tools to highlight locations where the concentrations of undesirable substances in the groundwater may be elevated. Two forms of statistical analysis are used to create exceedance probability maps for U and Rn in NH groundwater. T

Water-quality monitoring of the Merrimack River watershed in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey has been working in collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection on a project to collect water-quality data from the Merrimack River watershed since April 2020. Twelve locations in the Merrimack River watershed are being sampled for nutrients (such as nitrogen), metals (such as aluminum), Escherichia coli bacteria, and other measures.

Optical properties of dissolved organic matter in throughfall and stemflow vary across tree species and season in a temperate headwater forest

Tree-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) comprises a significant carbon flux within forested watersheds. Few studies have assessed the optical properties of tree-derived DOM. To increase understanding of the factors controlling tree-derived DOM quality, we measured DOM optical properties, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and calcium concentrations in throughfall and stemflow for 17 individual rai

Science

A Statewide Hydraulic Modeling Tool for Stream Crossing Projects in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), began a series of studies in 2019 to develop a web-based statewide hydraulic modeling tool to provide preliminary culvert designs for stream-crossing projects in Massachusetts.
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A Statewide Hydraulic Modeling Tool for Stream Crossing Projects in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), began a series of studies in 2019 to develop a web-based statewide hydraulic modeling tool to provide preliminary culvert designs for stream-crossing projects in Massachusetts.
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Regional Regression Equations for Estimating Selected Low-flow Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Recreation and Conservation, Office of Water Resources, began a study in 2019 to update the regional regression equations for estimating selected low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in Massachusetts.
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Regional Regression Equations for Estimating Selected Low-flow Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Recreation and Conservation, Office of Water Resources, began a study in 2019 to update the regional regression equations for estimating selected low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in Massachusetts.
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Water Quality Monitoring in the Cambridge Drinking-Water Source Area, Massachusetts

The Cambridge Water Department supplies approximately 13 million gallons per day of drinking water to more than 100,000 customers. Raw water is obtained from a serial system of three primary storage reservoirs—Cambridge Reservoir (also known as the Hobbs Brook Reservoir), Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond Reservoir—in parts of Cambridge, Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham, and Weston, Massachusetts...
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Water Quality Monitoring in the Cambridge Drinking-Water Source Area, Massachusetts

The Cambridge Water Department supplies approximately 13 million gallons per day of drinking water to more than 100,000 customers. Raw water is obtained from a serial system of three primary storage reservoirs—Cambridge Reservoir (also known as the Hobbs Brook Reservoir), Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond Reservoir—in parts of Cambridge, Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham, and Weston, Massachusetts...
Learn More