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New England Water Science Center

Welcome to the USGS New England Water Science Center. We provide timely and reliable information to Federal, State, Tribal, and local stakeholders on the water resources of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Our data help safeguard human and wildlife health, public safety, and environmental sustainability.

For assistance, contact us on our Connect page.

News

WaterMarks Newsletter - Spring 2024

WaterMarks Newsletter - Spring 2024

USGS Attends 2024 Northeast Section Meeting of GSA

USGS Attends 2024 Northeast Section Meeting of GSA

Popular Social Media Posts - Winter 2024

Popular Social Media Posts - Winter 2024

Publications

Effects of episodic stream dewatering on brook trout spatial population structure

Stream dewatering is expected to become more prevalent due to climate change, and we explored the potential consequences for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) within a temperate forest ecosystem in eastern North America.We estimated fish density within stream pools (n = 386) from electrofishing surveys over 10 years (2012–2021) to compare a stream that exhibits episodic dewatering (Paine Run) ag
Authors
Nathaniel P. Hitt, Karli M Rogers, Karmann G. Kessler, Martin Briggs, Jennifer Burlingame Hoyle Fair, Andrew C. Dolloff

Association of water arsenic with incident diabetes in U.S. adults: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and The Strong Heart Study

OBJECTIVEWe examined the association of arsenic in federally regulated community water systems (CWSs) and unregulated private wells with type 2 diabetes (T2D) incidence in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS), a prospective study of American Indian communities, and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a prospective study of racially and ethnically diverse urban U.S. communities.RESEAR
Authors
Maya Spaur, Marta Galvez-Fernandez, Qixuan Chen, Melissa Lombard, Benjamin Bostick, Pam Factor-Litvak, Amanda Fretts, Steven Shea, Ana Navas-Acien, Anne E Nigra

Characterizing future streamflows in Massachusetts using stochastic modeling—A pilot study

Communities throughout Massachusetts face the potential effects of climate change, ranging from more extreme rainfall to more pronounced and frequent droughts. Understanding the effects of climate change on hydrology is important to State and community officials to evaluate the potential effects on infrastructure and water systems. To better understand the effects of climate change on hydrology, t
Authors
Scott A. Olson, Ghazal Shabestanipour, Jonathan Lamontagne, Scott Steinschneider

Science

Delineating High-Resolution Urban Drainage Systems for Stormwater Management in the Neponset River Watershed

The natural environment and manmade infrastructure must be considered when characterizing hydrology and water quality in urban watersheds. This requirement is critical in stormwater management, which must account for how water flows above ground and underground through stormwater infrastructure. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), with support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is...
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Delineating High-Resolution Urban Drainage Systems for Stormwater Management in the Neponset River Watershed

The natural environment and manmade infrastructure must be considered when characterizing hydrology and water quality in urban watersheds. This requirement is critical in stormwater management, which must account for how water flows above ground and underground through stormwater infrastructure. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), with support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is...
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New England Tribal Engagement

The USGS New England Water Science Center (WSC) is proud to provide science support to Tribal Nations as part of our Federal Trust Responsibility to honor the government-to-government relationships that the United States has with 574 Federally-recognized Tribes. Tribal Nations have ancestral ties with the environment. Natural resources are inextricably connected to sustenance, traditional...
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New England Tribal Engagement

The USGS New England Water Science Center (WSC) is proud to provide science support to Tribal Nations as part of our Federal Trust Responsibility to honor the government-to-government relationships that the United States has with 574 Federally-recognized Tribes. Tribal Nations have ancestral ties with the environment. Natural resources are inextricably connected to sustenance, traditional...
Learn More

Investigating Associations Between Socioeconomic Data and Populations Vulnerable to Private Well-Water Concerns in New Hampshire

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is investigating the presence of statistical associations between socioeconomic data (or proxy data) and the susceptibility of private wells to water quality or quantity concerns in New Hampshire.
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Investigating Associations Between Socioeconomic Data and Populations Vulnerable to Private Well-Water Concerns in New Hampshire

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is investigating the presence of statistical associations between socioeconomic data (or proxy data) and the susceptibility of private wells to water quality or quantity concerns in New Hampshire.
Learn More