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New England Water Science Center Projects

The New England Water Science Center monitors, analyzes, and communicates information on the quality and movement of surface water and groundwater within the states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. 

Explore our projects to learn more about the scientific investigations we conduct. Use keywords and the available filters to narrow your search scope.

Explore Our Projects

Filter Total Items: 88

New England Tribal Engagement

The USGS New England Water Science Center (WSC) is proud to provide science support to Tribal Nations as part of our Federal Trust Responsibility to honor the government-to-government relationships that the United States has with 574 Federally-recognized Tribes. Tribal Nations have ancestral ties with the environment. Natural resources are inextricably connected to sustenance, traditional...
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New England Tribal Engagement

The USGS New England Water Science Center (WSC) is proud to provide science support to Tribal Nations as part of our Federal Trust Responsibility to honor the government-to-government relationships that the United States has with 574 Federally-recognized Tribes. Tribal Nations have ancestral ties with the environment. Natural resources are inextricably connected to sustenance, traditional...
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Investigating Associations Between Socioeconomic Data and Populations Vulnerable to Private Well-Water Concerns in New Hampshire

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is investigating the presence of statistical associations between socioeconomic data (or proxy data) and the susceptibility of private wells to water quality or quantity concerns in New Hampshire.
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Investigating Associations Between Socioeconomic Data and Populations Vulnerable to Private Well-Water Concerns in New Hampshire

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, is investigating the presence of statistical associations between socioeconomic data (or proxy data) and the susceptibility of private wells to water quality or quantity concerns in New Hampshire.
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USGS Assessment of Water Resources near Hanscom Air Force Base

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center is expanding its scientific investigation to better understand the water resources at, and in the vicinity of, Hanscom Air Force Base (AFB) and the potential impacts from historical base operations and other sources.
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USGS Assessment of Water Resources near Hanscom Air Force Base

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center is expanding its scientific investigation to better understand the water resources at, and in the vicinity of, Hanscom Air Force Base (AFB) and the potential impacts from historical base operations and other sources.
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Long Island Sound Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed Attributes (SPARROW) Models

The U.S. Geological Survey, New England Water Science Center, in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is modeling seasonal nutrient loads to Long Island Sound (LIS). Nutrients that originate from within the 41,867-square-mile section of the LIS watershed that is north of the Sound include both point (specific) and nonpoint (widespread) sources. Dynamic modeling of the...
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Long Island Sound Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed Attributes (SPARROW) Models

The U.S. Geological Survey, New England Water Science Center, in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is modeling seasonal nutrient loads to Long Island Sound (LIS). Nutrients that originate from within the 41,867-square-mile section of the LIS watershed that is north of the Sound include both point (specific) and nonpoint (widespread) sources. Dynamic modeling of the...
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Stream Flood Vulnerability Assessment at Acadia National Park

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Acadia National Park, is assessing the vulnerability of the park’s streams, culverts, and bridges to flood damage and erosion using design flows for selected high streamflow recurrence intervals to inform management decisions on infrastructure upgrades.
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Stream Flood Vulnerability Assessment at Acadia National Park

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Acadia National Park, is assessing the vulnerability of the park’s streams, culverts, and bridges to flood damage and erosion using design flows for selected high streamflow recurrence intervals to inform management decisions on infrastructure upgrades.
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Water Resources Inventory and Assessment at Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the National Park Service, is compiling and evaluating all known water resources, and documented infrastructure associated with these resources, within the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument and contributing associated watersheds.
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Water Resources Inventory and Assessment at Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the National Park Service, is compiling and evaluating all known water resources, and documented infrastructure associated with these resources, within the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument and contributing associated watersheds.
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Delineating High-Resolution Urban Drainage Systems for Stormwater Management in the Mystic River Watershed

Characterizing hydrology and pollutant inputs in urban watersheds requires the consideration of both the natural and manmade environment. The Mystic River Basin is a highly urbanized, 76-square-mile watershed north of Boston, Massachusetts, that includes several underserved communities. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a watershed-scale web application of the Mystic River Basin to...
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Delineating High-Resolution Urban Drainage Systems for Stormwater Management in the Mystic River Watershed

Characterizing hydrology and pollutant inputs in urban watersheds requires the consideration of both the natural and manmade environment. The Mystic River Basin is a highly urbanized, 76-square-mile watershed north of Boston, Massachusetts, that includes several underserved communities. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a watershed-scale web application of the Mystic River Basin to...
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Quality of Stormwater Runoff Discharged from Connecticut Highways

Existing highway-runoff data do not adequately address the informational needs of stormwater professionals in Connecticut because there have been relatively few studies of highway runoff in the Northeastern United States. Consequently, the U.S. Geological Survey, New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Connecticut Department of Transportation (CTDOT), is conducting a 4-year project...
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Quality of Stormwater Runoff Discharged from Connecticut Highways

Existing highway-runoff data do not adequately address the informational needs of stormwater professionals in Connecticut because there have been relatively few studies of highway runoff in the Northeastern United States. Consequently, the U.S. Geological Survey, New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Connecticut Department of Transportation (CTDOT), is conducting a 4-year project...
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Effectiveness of Open-Graded Friction Course Pavement in Reducing Suspended-Sediment Loads Discharged from Massachusetts Highways

The U.S. Geological Survey New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), is evaluating how a type of porous pavement affects the discharge of suspended sediment in comparison to the asphalt surface commonly used on Massachusetts highways. The project will expand the understanding of highway runoff concentrations of suspended sediment...
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Effectiveness of Open-Graded Friction Course Pavement in Reducing Suspended-Sediment Loads Discharged from Massachusetts Highways

The U.S. Geological Survey New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), is evaluating how a type of porous pavement affects the discharge of suspended sediment in comparison to the asphalt surface commonly used on Massachusetts highways. The project will expand the understanding of highway runoff concentrations of suspended sediment...
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A Statewide Hydraulic Modeling Tool for Stream Crossing Projects in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), began a series of studies in 2019 to develop a web-based statewide hydraulic modeling tool to provide preliminary culvert designs for stream-crossing projects in Massachusetts.
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A Statewide Hydraulic Modeling Tool for Stream Crossing Projects in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), began a series of studies in 2019 to develop a web-based statewide hydraulic modeling tool to provide preliminary culvert designs for stream-crossing projects in Massachusetts.
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Regional Regression Equations for Estimating Selected Low-flow Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Recreation and Conservation, Office of Water Resources, began a study in 2019 to update the regional regression equations for estimating selected low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in Massachusetts.
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Regional Regression Equations for Estimating Selected Low-flow Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Massachusetts

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Recreation and Conservation, Office of Water Resources, began a study in 2019 to update the regional regression equations for estimating selected low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in Massachusetts.
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Water Quality Monitoring in the Cambridge Drinking-Water Source Area, Massachusetts

The Cambridge Water Department supplies approximately 13 million gallons per day of drinking water to more than 100,000 customers. Raw water is obtained from a serial system of three primary storage reservoirs—Cambridge Reservoir (also known as the Hobbs Brook Reservoir), Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond Reservoir—in parts of Cambridge, Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham, and Weston, Massachusetts...
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Water Quality Monitoring in the Cambridge Drinking-Water Source Area, Massachusetts

The Cambridge Water Department supplies approximately 13 million gallons per day of drinking water to more than 100,000 customers. Raw water is obtained from a serial system of three primary storage reservoirs—Cambridge Reservoir (also known as the Hobbs Brook Reservoir), Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond Reservoir—in parts of Cambridge, Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham, and Weston, Massachusetts...
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