New England Water Science Center

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Welcome to the USGS New England Water Science Center.  Our mission is to collect timely and reliable information on the water resources of our six-state region (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont), and to partner with Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies in hydrologic studies that advance human health, public safety, and environmental sustainability. 

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Highlighted Publication

Highlighted Publication

USGS describes April’s floods in New England.

USGS has released the preliminary peak-flows for 63 streamgages in New England to identify the severity of the high water and flooding during April of 2019.

Read the report

Selected Projects

Selected Projects

Explore New England WSC science projects.

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Water Conditions Maps

Current water conditions:

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News

Date published: April 15, 2019

New publication by New England WSC Staff

Gregory Granato of the NEWSC and Susan Jones of the Federal Highway Administration recently published an article in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Transportation Research Record journal. The paper is: 

Granato, G.E., Jones, S.C. 2019,  Simulating Runoff Quality with the Highway Runoff Database and the...

Date published: April 9, 2019

Drought Streamflow Probabilities in Northeast Region

Maximum likelihood logistic regression (MLLR) is used to estimate drought probabilities for selected Northeast rivers and streams. Winter streamflows are used to estimate the chance of hydrologic drought during summer months. This application allows the display and query of these drought streamflow probabilities for Northeastern streams.

Date published: March 4, 2019

USGS contributes to the Fourth National Climate Assessment

USGS Research Hydrologist Glenn Hodgkins co-authored the Fourth National Climate Assessment’s Northeast chapter. USGS Research Geologist Erika Lentz was also a co-author. The recently published chapter discusses historical and potential future impacts of climatic changes on New England’s people and natural resources, including it’s inland and coastal waters.

Publications

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Year Published: 2019

Preliminary stage and streamflow data at selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in New England for the floods of April 2019

The combination of rainfall and snowmelt in northern New England and rainfall in southern New England resulted in minor to major flooding from April 15 to 24, 2019, according to stage and streamflow data collected at 63 selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages. A typical USGS streamgage measures and records stream stage and estimates...

Kiah, Richard G.; Smith, Brianna A.; Stasulis, Nicholas W.
Kiah, R.G, Smith, B.A. and Stasulis, N.W., 2019, Preliminary stage and streamflow data at selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in New England for the floods of April 2019: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019–1051, 8 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191052.

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Year Published: 2019

Use of a Numerical Model to Simulate the Hydrologic System and Transport of Contaminants Near Joint Base Cape Cod, Western Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Historical training and operational activities at Joint Base Cape Cod (JBCC) on western Cape Cod, Massachusetts, have resulted in the release of contaminants into an underlying glacial aquifer that is the sole source of water to the surrounding communities. Remedial systems have been installed to contain and remove contamination from the aquifer....

Walter, Donald A.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Fienen, Michael N.
Walter, D.A., McCobb, T.D., and Fienen, M.N., 2019, Use of a numerical model to simulate the hydrologic system and transport of contaminants near Joint Base Cape Cod, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2018–5139, 98 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20185139.

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Year Published: 2019

Drought forecasting for streams and groundwaters in northeastern United States

BackgroundWhen rainfall is lower than normal over an extended period, streamflows decline, groundwater levels fall, and hydrological drought can occur. Droughts can reduce the water available for societal needs, such as public and private drinking-water supplies, farming, and industry, and for ecological health, such as maintenance of water...

Austin, Samuel H.; Dudley, Robert W.
Austin, S.H., and Dudley, R.W., 2019, Drought forecasting for streams and groundwaters in northeastern United States: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2019–3015, 4 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20193015.