New England Water Science Center

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Welcome to the USGS New England Water Science Center. We provide timely and reliable information to Federal, State, Tribal, and local stakeholders on the water resources of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Our data help safeguard human and wildlife health, public safety, and environmental sustainability. 

For assistance, please contact us through our Connect page.

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Selected Projects

Selected Projects

Explore New England WSC science projects.

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Scituate Reservoir

Scituate Reservoir

The Scituate Reservoir system is the largest inland body of water in Rhode Island and the principal drinking-water supply for more than 60 percent of the State’s population. 

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News

Date published: July 27, 2021

Connecticut Networks Section Summer Update

The Hydrologic Monitoring Program’s Connecticut Networks Section responded to recent high flow events to verify stage-discharge relationships and has been hard at work this summer installing new gages and performing maintenance on the Connecticut gage network. 

July 1, 2021

WaterMarks Newsletter - Summer 2021

In this issue we put one of our outstanding staff, Alex Bissell, on Center Stage, and spotlight our Applied Hydrology Program, research on the effects of climate change on water resources, and our streamflow and water-quality data-collection networks. Explore this quarter’s publications and learn more about the fantastic science our folks produce in partnership with our stakeholders. Happy 4th

Date published: June 29, 2021

Streamflow Conditions in New England, Spring 2021

Streamflow conditions in New England were highly variable this spring.

Publications

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Year Published: 2021

Model estimated baseflow for streams with endangered Atlantic Salmon in Maine, USA

We present a regression model for estimating mean August baseflow per square kilometer of drainage area to help resource managers assess relative amounts of baseflow in Maine streams with Atlantic Salmon habitat. The model was derived from mean August baseflows computed at 31 USGS streamflow gages in Maine. We use an ordinary least squares...

Lombard, Pamela J.; Dudley, Robert; Collins, Matthias J.; Saunders, Rory; Atkinson, Ernie

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Year Published: 2021

Hydraulic modeling at selected dam-removal and culvert-retrofit sites in the northeastern United States

Aquatic connectivity projects, such as removing dams and modifying culverts, have substantial benefits. The restoration of natural flow conditions improves water quality, sediment transport, aquatic and riparian habitat, and fish passage. These projects can also decrease hazards faced by communities by lowering water-surface elevations of flood...

Olson, Scott A.; Simeone, Caelan E.
Olson, S.A., and Simeone, C.E., 2021, Hydraulic modeling at selected dam-removal and culvert-retrofit sites in the northeastern United States: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5056, 37 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215056.

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Year Published: 2021

Approaches for assessing long-term annual yields of highway and urban runoff in selected areas of California with the Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM)

The California Department of Transportation, commonly known as CalTrans, and other municipal separate storm sewer system permittees in California as well as other State departments of transportation nationwide need information about potential loads and yields (loads per unit area) of constituents of concern in stormwater runoff and discharges from...

Granato, Gregory E.; Friesz, Paul J.
Granato, G.E., and Friesz, P.J., 2021, Approaches for assessing long-term annual yields of highway and urban runoff in selected areas of California with the Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM): U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2021–5043, 37 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20215043.