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Threatened and Endangered Listed Insects

Filter Total Items: 4

Determining the dietary preferences and population genetics of an endangered bumble bee, Bombus affinis, by maximizing the use of museum specimens

Bombus affinis, the rusty patched bumble bee, was federally listed as an endangered species in 2017 and has been identified as one of the top priority species for recovery nationally. Shortly after listing the species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services and other partners prioritized the research needed to prevent the extinction of B. affinis. Some of the top research needs that were identified...
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Determining the dietary preferences and population genetics of an endangered bumble bee, Bombus affinis, by maximizing the use of museum specimens

Bombus affinis, the rusty patched bumble bee, was federally listed as an endangered species in 2017 and has been identified as one of the top priority species for recovery nationally. Shortly after listing the species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services and other partners prioritized the research needed to prevent the extinction of B. affinis. Some of the top research needs that were identified...
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Developing a sampling and modeling framework to support Dakota skipper management decisions

The presence or absence of an endangered species on the landscape can have significant policy implications for public land managers and private landowners. The Dakota Skipper, a grassland dependent butterfly, was recently listed as a threatened species under The Endangered Species Act in 2014. This listing has created controversy in the states of North and South Dakota because of the potential...
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Developing a sampling and modeling framework to support Dakota skipper management decisions

The presence or absence of an endangered species on the landscape can have significant policy implications for public land managers and private landowners. The Dakota Skipper, a grassland dependent butterfly, was recently listed as a threatened species under The Endangered Species Act in 2014. This listing has created controversy in the states of North and South Dakota because of the potential...
Learn More

Improving monitoring techniques for nests of interior least terns and piping plovers

Least terns and piping plovers are the subject of numerous population monitoring efforts. Population monitoring requires periodic visits to nesting areas to count and assess breeding status of the birds. At higher visit frequencies, detection of nests and chicks improves as does ability to determine outcomes of nesting attempts, resulting in more complete and accurate productivity information. But...
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Improving monitoring techniques for nests of interior least terns and piping plovers

Least terns and piping plovers are the subject of numerous population monitoring efforts. Population monitoring requires periodic visits to nesting areas to count and assess breeding status of the birds. At higher visit frequencies, detection of nests and chicks improves as does ability to determine outcomes of nesting attempts, resulting in more complete and accurate productivity information. But...
Learn More

Demographic response of least terns and piping plovers to the 2011 Missouri River Flood

The largest recorded flood event on the Missouri River occurred during 2011. Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center recently concluded a study that evaluated effects of that flood on least tern and piping plover breeding populations. These federally-listed species nest on riverine sandbars and reservoir shorelines. Since construction of the dams on the Missouri River there have been few floods...
link

Demographic response of least terns and piping plovers to the 2011 Missouri River Flood

The largest recorded flood event on the Missouri River occurred during 2011. Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center recently concluded a study that evaluated effects of that flood on least tern and piping plover breeding populations. These federally-listed species nest on riverine sandbars and reservoir shorelines. Since construction of the dams on the Missouri River there have been few floods...
Learn More