Washington Water Science Center

Data and Tools

The USGS Washington Water Science Center currently operates over 380 data-collection sites in Washington.  The sites collect surface water, groundwater, water quality and meteorological data that are available in real time.  Current and historic data can be retrieved from the National Database called the National Water Information System (NWIS). Many of the links below access this database.

Surface Water

Surface Water

Streamflow measurements are vital to understanding stream conditions. We monitor rivers & streams throughout Washington.

Streamflow Data

Water Quality

Water Quality

Monitoring water quality is important for protecting human and ecosystem health. We monitor rivers, streams, and lakes around the state.

Water-Quality Data

Groundwater

Groundwater

The USGS monitors groundwater levels throughout Washington. The data are used to determine sustainable pumping rates for irrigation and domestic supplies.

Groundwater Data
Filter Total Items: 92
Date published: January 1, 2018

Probability of Streamflow Permanence (PROSPER) Model Output Layers

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed the PRObability of Streamflow PERmanence (PROSPER) model, a GIS raster-based empirical model that provides streamflow permanence probabilities (probabilistic predictions) of a stream channel having year-round flow for any unregulated and minimally-impaired stream channel in the Pacific Northwest region, U.S. The model provides annual predictions...

Date published: January 1, 2018

Measures of the vulnerability of runoff to drought during 2015 in the western United States

Measures used to assess the vulnerability of streamflow in 326 river basins to the 2015 drought in the western United States.

Date published: January 1, 2018

Probability of Streamflow Permanence (PROSPER) Continuous Parameter Grids (CPGs)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed the PRObability of Streamflow PERmanence (PROSPER) model, a GIS raster-based empirical model that provides streamflow permanence probabilities (probabilistic predictions) of a stream channel having year-round flow for any unregulated and minimally-impaired stream channel in the Pacific Northwest region, U.S. The model provides annual

Date published: January 1, 2018

Climatic CPGs -- Probability of Streamflow Permanence (PROSPER) Continuous Parameter Grids (CPGs)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed the PRObability of Streamflow PERmanence (PROSPER) model, a GIS raster-based empirical model that provides streamflow permanence probabilities (probabilistic predictions) of a stream channel having year-round flow for any unregulated and minimally-impaired stream channel in the Pacific Northwest region, U.S. The model provides annual

Date published: January 1, 2018

Biological metrics used in a USGS National Water Quality Project assessing nutrients in agricultural streams

This dataset includes algal and invertebrate metrics used to assess water quality conditions in agricultural streams of the Midwest. Data was collected in wadable streams from 2003 to 2008. Data includes two benthic algal metrics (percent eutrophic taxa and observed taxa/expected taxa) and two benthic invertebrate metrics (EPT taxa and observed taxa/expected taxa).

Date published: January 1, 2018

Physical CPGs -- Probability of Streamflow Permanence (PROSPER) Continuous Parameter Grids (CPGs)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed the PRObability of Streamflow PERmanence (PROSPER) model, a GIS raster-based empirical model that provides streamflow permanence probabilities (probabilistic predictions) of a stream channel having year-round flow for any unregulated and minimally-impaired stream channel in the Pacific Northwest region, U.S. The model provides annual

Date published: January 1, 2018

Dissolved oxygen data used in a USGS National Water Quality Project assessing nutrients in agricultural streams

This dataset includes dissolved oxygen data collected at 5-min intervals over a 24-hour period at three agricultural streams: Maple Creek in NE (2004), Morgan Creek in Delaware (2004) and Stalker Creek in Idaho (2007).

Date published: January 1, 2018

Soil Water Balance Model of Upper Chehalis River Basin, Southwestern Washington

This archive documents a Soil Water Balance (SWB) model of the 895-square mile upper Chehalis River Basin upstream of Grand Mound, Washington. The SWB model used to estimate a water budget (including precipitation, interception, groundwater recharge, surface runoff, and groundwater pumping) for the upper Chehalis River Basin during October 2001–September 2015.

Date published: January 1, 2018

Water temperature and dissolved oxygen data from Stalker Creek, Idaho, used in a USGS National Water Quality Project assessing nutrients in agricultural streams

This dataset includes water temperature and dissolved oxygen collected during July 2007 from Stalker Creek in Idaho. Data was collected at 3 minute intervals over several days.

Date published: November 17, 2017

Groundwater data for Washington

Data from wells, springs, test holes, tunnels, drains, and excavations in Washington; well location data includes information such as latitude and longitude, well depth, and aquifer. Groundwater level data are collected and stored as either discrete field-water-level measurements or as continuous time-series data from automated recorders.

Date published: November 17, 2017

Water-quality data for Washington

Chemical, physical, and biological properties of water, sediment, and tissue samples from Washington. Water-quality data are collected as either discrete field measurements or as continuous time-series data from automated recorders that continuously record physical and chemical characteristics including pH, specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen.

Date published: October 1, 2017

Water-use data for Washington

Water-use data is collected by area type (state, county, watershed, or aquifer) and source (such as rivers or groundwater), and category (such as public supply or irrigation). Water-use data has been reported every five years since 1985. The USGS works in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies as well as academic and private organizations to collect and report withdrawals.