Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Invasive Species

An invasive species is an introduced species that has established itself and threatens the diversity and/or stability of a native species or environment. WARC researches the basic biology and environmental tolerances of these plant and animal species to provide resource managers with the ecological facts they need to help mitigate and control these problematic species.
Filter Total Items: 27
Date published: April 4, 2019
Status: Active

Survey and Assessment of Live Food Markets as an Invasion Pathway

Live food markets may be a source of the increasing number of non-native wild invertebrate and fish species, like Asian swamp eels and snakeheads. USGS is surveying such markets around the United States to identify and document species that might be of concern if released live into the wild to assess if the live food market is a possible invasion pathway. 

Contacts: Leo Nico, Ph.D.
Date published: March 26, 2019
Status: Active

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Alert Risk Mapper (ARM)

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) program has developed a new tool, the NAS Alert Risk Mapper (ARM), to characterize waterbodies in the conterminous U.S. and Hawaii at potential risk of invasion from a new nonindigenous species sighting.

Date published: March 5, 2019
Status: Active

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Flood and Storm Tracker (FaST)

Storm-related flooding can lead to the potential spread of nonindigenous (or non-native) aquatic species into waterways they have not been seen in before. The USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program has developed an innovative mapping tool to help natural resource managers with post-storm nonindigenous aquatic species detection and assessment efforts. 

Date published: March 1, 2019
Status: Active

A Structured Decision-Making Framework for Controlling, Monitoring, and Containment of Invasive Species through Trapping: An Application to the Argentine Black and White Tegu

USGS is applying decision analysis to identify cost-effective methods for controlling invasive species like the Argentine black and white tegu.

Date published: February 28, 2019
Status: Active

Decision Analysis to Help Improve the Effectiveness of Invasive Plants Management

Melaleuca is an invasive tree that is highly problematic in the Everglades, threatening native wildlife and habitat. USGS is helping to improve management strategies for the invasive plant. 

Date published: February 28, 2019
Status: Completed

Fish Slam November 2018

In November 2018, USGS researchers joined partners in South Florida where they sampled freshwater bodies for non-native fishes. The bi-annual Fish Slam event helps monitor new introductions and document range expansion of known non-native fishes. 

Date published: February 27, 2019
Status: Active

Development of a Quantitative Risk Assessment Tool to Predict Invasiveness of Non-native Freshwater Fishes in Everglades National Park

The introduction of non-native fishes is a problem across the United States, particularly in Florida. USGS scientists are developing a decision support tool to help natural resourece managers prioritize which species to focus prevention, detection, rapid response, and control efforts. 

Contacts: Pamela J Schofield, Ph.D., Daniel Slone, Ph.D., William F. Loftus, Jeff Kline
Date published: June 18, 2018
Status: Active

Using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Capabilities to Help Identify Hummock-Hollow Formation and Fragmentation in Critical Marsh Habitat for Mottled Ducks

For many years, coastal marshes in Texas and Louisiana have served as critical habitat for the mottled duck (Anas fulvigula), which is considered a priority species in the Texas/Louisiana Gulf Coast area.

Date published: August 30, 2016
Status: Active

Developing Techniques for Estimating Nutria (Myocastor coypus) Abundance

Nutrias (Myocastor coypus) are an aquatic rodent imported from South America to the United States in the 1920-40’s for the fur farms. Since their original importation they have become established in the wild in many regions of the United States.

Date published: May 6, 2016

Optimal Control Strategies for Invasive Exotics in South Florida

The establishment and proliferation of exotic plants and animals can interfere with native ecological processes and can cause severe stress to sensitive ecosystems.

Date published: May 2, 2016
Status: Active

Detection, tracking, and removal of non-native marine fishes in Florida

Thirty-four species of non-native marine fishes have been documented in Florida, and their distributions are currently being tracked via the US Geological Survey’s Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (USGS-NAS) database.

Date published: May 2, 2016

Lionfish Distribution, Geographic Spread, Biology, and Ecology

Many aspects of lionfish biology are studied at the USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.  As part of the U.S. Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species database, the distribution of lionfish is tracked over time.